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on 1 August 2013
I thoroughly enjoyed this!!!
It's not the greatest film ever, but it is funny, heart warming and that little bit "different".
There are scenes that will remain with me and still make me smile when I think of them.
Would definitely recommend it!
... perhaps not to my older friends :-)
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If you're going to make a zom-rom-com (are those in the right order?) then Edgar Wright's superb Sean of the Dead is always going to be the high water mark you have to shoot for. With such little margin for error, it's perhaps lucky, then, that Warm Bodies has Isaac Marion's hugely popular 2010 YA novel as its starting point.

The film begins with Nicholas Hoult's R (he can't remember the other letters in his name) shuffling around a post-apocalyptic airport with his undead familiars. Through use of a handy voiceover, R reveals that he is frustrated with being unable to connect with anyone living or otherwise, and, as well as human flesh, craves some kind of meaning to his life.

This all changes, however, when R and a small band of undead comrades stumble upon a group of survivors, including K-stew lookalike, Julie (Teresa Palmer). First things first, though, and, whilst Julie and her band of scavengers pump some serious led into the groaning hoard, R happily chows down on Julie's boyfriend's brains.

This is where zombie purists may start to have a problem with Warm Bodies. In this Z-world, zombies get to experience the human memories of their victims whilst they consume their brains. On top of that, zombies can run and, after a while, they apparently give up on existence and turn into a boney; a skeletal and super-aggressive zombie 2.0. But, traditional or not, these tweaks actually underpin the best aspects of the film.

So, purely because he has eaten Julie's boyfriend and experienced love towards her, R decides to save her from the other zoms. He even begins to develop his own feelings for his new, non-rotten companion to boot. Obviously, this is an unconventional and forbidden love and the story is a real spin on Romeo and Juliet. Strangely, R's darkly comic thoughts quickly endear you to the blossoming romance, and many of the film's intimate moments, particularly a sequence that sees R and Julie communicate through use of vinyl records, are surprisingly touching.

Warm Bodies can be read a variety of ways; is it a metaphorical commentary on men's inability to express themselves? An exploration of love as salvation? Or, is it perhaps just a hilarious and action-packed zombie romp. The truth is Warm Bodies can be appreciated on numerous levels, and this is what makes it a dead-cert to entertain any open-minded audience.
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on 11 November 2013
What a great idea! A zombie movie told from the perspective of the zombies - Nicholas Hoult is great as `R', an unfortunate victim of an unspecified plague that has left the majority of the population as the shuffling undead, and the remainder (led by an austere John Malkovich) hiding behind a huge wall, occasionally venturing out in order to reduce the surplus (zombie) population. R is different from other zombies - he thinks, listens to (admittedly bad) music on a turntable, and `lives' in an abandoned aeroplane, contemplating his meaningless existence and occasionally imbibing the memories of the non-zombie few by eating their brains. When he meets Julie (Malkovich's spirited daughter), R finds a new purpose, and to the amazement of all, the unthinkable begins to become reality.
A fine, original and engaging movie - if a little slight. Warm and appealing performances (although JM is as ever an acquired taste), I would certainly recommend it as an antidote to those Twilight yawn-fests and the like.
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on 25 October 2013
Zombie folklore is everywhere at the moment..it seems to be the latest craze and here we have a refreshing, morbid and slightly melancholic take on a romantic comedy..the lead being a zombie who falls for a female human survivor.
Though the plot sounds pretty cheesy, Warm Bodies has a little more life to it than that. A little. pun intended. It manages to maintain a creditable amount of humor throughout, although the writing is far from original, the acting however is enchanting especially from Hoult as a man who is trying his hardest to fight the affliction he has been dealt. Twilight will be compared but this has more charm than those movies and i suppose skirts the sentimental line a bit, probably this is why i liked it though.
Its like Bub from Day of the Dead(the 1985 original) had been given his own movie and we get a first hand account of what it might be like to regain emotions we all take for granted sometimes. Not as frighteningly bad as you might pre conceive!
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TOP 50 REVIEWERon 21 April 2016
Tom Ford is credited as visual effects producer on this film, having directed Nicholas Hoult in A Single Man. For viewers not usually into the zombie film, who may likewise be thinking of going from that film to this, it is probably a step worth taking! Hoult plays the zombie "R" who falls in love with a mortal, Julie (Teresa Palmer), and gradually begins to become something else. I usually have an aversion to zombie films but this one is different, being very warmhearted, not too grisly - although there are some unpleasant bits to deal with, and gruesome plot details. It also has quite a lot of comic moments, which work well. The chemistry between the leads is palpable; another zombie who follows R into human warmth is a welcome back-up, while the scale of the film opens up to a War of the Worlds kind of grandeur, or Invasion of the Body Snatchers. The grey, post-apocalyptic world is suitably evoked in metal tones, with the boy in his burgundy hoodie running around looking less pale and lost by the scene. It has something of Donnie Darko in feel, a moment of glowing hearts like E.T., and obvious similarities to Romeo and Juliet. No doubt it would be particularly appealing to viewers in their late teens/early 20s, but anyone can be moved, unexpectedly, by this slightly gauche passion in a city under siege. Boosted by excellent performances by Rob Corddry and John Malkovich, it has a good soundtrack, too, some of it played on vinyl by the characters ...
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on 16 April 2015
This is perhaps the oddest adaptation of Romeo and Juliet to date. The names "R" (Nicholas Hoult) and Julie (Teresa Palmer) should clue you in. The film starts out with first person narration from "R", a zombie. He let's us know he can not connect with people, the theme of the film that zombies are simply people who have lost their connection to other people. If they can regain that connection, they can be cured or at any rate, not smell as bad.

In this tale "R" consumes the brains of Julie's boyfriend and gains his memory. This starts a platonic relationship where they protect each other from each other's world. "R" is a horder who lives in a plane. Julie's dad (John Malkovich) is the leader of zombie killers. The introduction of young kids with pseudo patriotic themes is a satire of the "Red Dawn" movies.

There are some questions that arise.
1) How do the skeletons, i.e. "bonies" stay together without falling apart?
2) How does a record player operate after 8 years into a zombie apocalypse with no electricity?
3) How does a person see their own face in their own memory?

This is a fun film, that drags at times. Will be a welcomed addition to my zombie film collection when it comes out. Almost a prequel to "Fido."

PARENTAL GUIDE: No sex or nudity. Zombie Rob Corddry whispers the F-bomb near the end of the film.
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on 4 May 2013
This is perhaps the oddest adaptation of Romeo and Juliet to date. The names "R" (Nicholas Hoult) and Julie (Teresa Palmer) should clue you in. The film starts out with first person narration from "R", a zombie. He let's us know he can not connect with people, the theme of the film that zombies are simply people who have lost their connection to other people. If they can regain that connection, they can be cured or at any rate, not smell as bad.

In this tale "R" consumes the brains of Julie's boyfriend and gains his memory. This starts a platonic relationship where they protect each other from each other's world. "R" is a horder who lives in a plane. Julie's dad (John Malkovich) is the leader of zombie killers. The introduction of young kids with pseudo patriotic themes is a satire of the "Red Dawn" movies.

There are some questions that arise.
1) How do the skeletons, i.e. "bonies" stay together without falling apart?
2) How does a record player operate after 8 years into a zombie apocalypse with no electricity?
3) How does a person see their own face in their own memory?

This is a fun film, that drags at times. Will be a welcomed addition to my zombie film collection when it comes out. Almost a prequel to "Fido."

PARENTAL GUIDE: No sex or nudity. Zombie Rob Corddry whispers the F-bomb near the end of the film.
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on 8 February 2013
Nicholas Hoult stars as R, the zombie with a voice. I am a massive fan of Hoult, ever since his days in Skins and I have watched him in everything he has been in since. While I was a little unsure about him being cast as R to begin with, I ended up being really happy with the choice. Hoult narrates for the most part of the film, talking over what is actually happening. This, obviously, is because he is a zombie. Although he can talk, to begin with R can only grunt a few words and it isn't until later in the film that he gets a wider vocabulary. I liked the narrative style though, as it gave R a very distinct voice, even if he could not use it himself. It must be hard to interact with other actors without actually talking for the most part. I think Hoult did a fantastic job as R, especially as he spends a lot of the time walking leaning to one side, looking extremely gross and grunting at everyone around him.

Teresa Palmer plays love interest Julie. The only thing I had seen her in previous to this was I am Number Four but she did impress me in that. I also think that when regarding the character from the book, she was a great choice for the role. Julie is a likeable character and in a world where everyone is out to just kill both the corpse zombies as well as the scary bones zombies, she is a bit different. Julie seems to understand that everything is not black and white and she is optimistic that things can change. This kind of attitude is also strengthened when Julie meets R. Although she is scared of him to begin with, it doesn't take her long to see that he is unlike any of the other zombies.

Something that might not be apparent unless you know, is that Warm Bodies is a sort of retelling of Romeo and Juliet. Not only does R represent Romeo and Julie as Juliet but other characters have their parts as well. Julie's best friend Nora represents the Nurse, zombie M represents Mercutio and Perry, Julie's boyfriend represents Paris. I thought that this way of retelling such a classic and famous love story was incredibly clever. As I said, you might not pick up on these things unless you already know. The themes of forbidden love are extremely strong in Warm Bodies, with R, a zombie, falling in love with a human girl who is very much alive. However, the retelling is not overdone and this doesn't take on every aspect of Romeo and Juliet, which was nice.

As well as having great characters, Warm Bodies is also really well paced. The plot is extremely interesting, with us getting to know R and his way of life to begin with. It doesn't take much time for him to run into Julie though and from there, the film only gets better. As the two characters get to know each other, their characters really come to life... literally in R's case. It was lovely to see the character development here through two people getting to know each other and what they enjoy. However, among R and the normal zombies are the scary bones zombies. These are very skeletal are no longer resemble humans. Due to R taking Julie back to the airport, the bones get a whiff of her and want to eat her. The bones provide the excitement in Warm Bodies, with them chasing R and Julie in order to get what they want.

Overall, Warm Bodies is a fantastic movie adaptation of one of my favourite young adult books.
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on 24 November 2013
"R" is a zombie played by Nicholas Hoult, who has thoughts that zombies just shouldn't have. "What am I doing here?". "My life is boring".
He and his fellow dead launch an attack on some twenty something americans scavenging for supplies to take back to their fortress city. The outcome?
R takes Julie (Played by the pretty actress Teresa Palmer) back to his abode.....a disused airliner at the zombie infested airport.
What develops is a return to humanity for not just R but all the other zombies.... with the exception of the bonies. They are too far gone and spend their time skulking around looking for easy meat.
Comparisons with Romeo and Juliette are readily made.
It is very touching in places, funny, and has a good finale.
Some great extras on the DVD make this well worth the price.
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I've read the book so I was prepared for the storyline but fans of the usual sort of zombie movies will be disappointed by this. It is definitely aimed at the younger generation, even the trailers give that impression, Twilight, Hunger Games and The Perks of being a Wallflower. What all these films have in common; like them or not, is production quality and this film is no exception.
By now you will probably know that it is about a zombie who recovers his humanity after saving a human girl (who just happens to be gorgeous) because he has eaten the brains of her boyfriend and acquired his memories. R the zombie must be a recent revenant as he still looks pretty fresh and appears to retain a lot of human traits. He takes her back to the airport where he lives with all his zombie friends and so their relationship takes place.
Now of course if the zombies are going to become rehabilitated then what are we going to do for baddies. Enter the 'bonies' who are zombies in their final stage of metamorphosis, nasty animated skeletons with a hunger to match their attitude problem who get more than a little peeved when the lesser zombies begin to change.
And that is the theme of this story really, through love you can regain your humanity and maybe your life. Its a nice idea and its very well done, in fact I thought the ending of the film flowed better than the ending of the book.
Overall the film is quite true to the book so if you're a fan of the latter you won't be disappointed. If you watch the deleted scenes in the extras you'll see that the director considered following the book even more closely than he did.
This is a good quality blu ray with an excellent full screen presentation and a 7.1 soundtrack.
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