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The Warlord of Mars MP3 CD – Audiobook, 11 Mar 2014


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MP3 CD, Audiobook, 11 Mar 2014
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Product details

  • MP3 CD
  • Publisher: Speculative!; MP3 Una edition (11 Mar. 2014)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 148057659X
  • ISBN-13: 978-1480576599
  • Product Dimensions: 13.7 x 1.3 x 19 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (16 customer reviews)

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Product Description

About the Author

Edgar Rice Burroughs (September 1, 1875 – March 19, 1950) was an American author, best known for his creation of the jungle hero Tarzan and the heroic Mars adventurer John Carter, although he produced works in many genres. --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 18 Nov. 1998
Format: Mass Market Paperback
If I had to be stuck on a desert island with only ten books, the Barsoomian trilogy (Princess of Mars, Gods of Mars, and Warlord of Mars) would be three of them. Warlord wraps up the tale as Carter takes up the trail of the incomparable Dejah Thoris, following her captors to the hidden cities of the polar regions, culminating in a battle that settles the future of Barsoom. All the breathless adventure, daring swordplay, hairsbreadth escapes, and dry humor you could ask for. Even more in control of his material than in the other two excellent volumes, Burroughs challenges himself both to keep in the established material about Barsoom and still invent new elements. If you have not read the Barsoomian trilogy, and you love SF adventure, buy it NOW! You will re-read it with delight the rest of your life.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Lawrance Bernabo HALL OF FAMEVINE VOICE on 26 Aug. 2003
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Edgar Rice Burroughs did not intended to write a trilogy, but his 1914 pulp novel “The Warlord of Mars” completes the story begun in “A Princess of Mars” and continued in “The Gods of Mars” and finally brings John Carter and his beloved Dejah Thoris, Princess of Helium (i.e., no cliffhanger this time around, boys and girls). The story picks up six months after the conclusion of “The Gods of Mars,” with our hero not knowing whether she is dead or alive in the Temple of the Sun of the Holy Therns where he last saw here with the blade of Phaidor was descending towards her heart as the evil Issus, queen of the First Born, had locked his mate in a cell that would not open for another year. However, it turns out that the exiled leader of the Therns has reached the trapped women to rescue his daughter and to seek revenge on Carter for exposing his evil cult.
The focus of “The Warlord of Mars” is on Carter’s relentless pursuit of the villainous Thurid who have taken his beloved princess from the south pole of Barsoom across rivers, desert, jungles, and ice to the forbidden lands of the north in the city of Kadabra where the combined armies of the green, red and black races attack the yellow tribes of the north, thereby justifying the book’s title. It is interesting to note that Carter’s heroics in this novel have the same sort of over the top implausibility we find in contemporary Hollywood blockbusters as ERB pours on the action sequences one on top of another. Whether he is scaling towers in the dark of night or surviving in a pit for over a week without food and water, John Carter is a manly hero in the great pulp fiction tradition of which ERB was an admitted master.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 20 April 2000
Format: Mass Market Paperback
When I was 22 I was working for a spell in Rhodesia and came across one of the John Carson on Mars series, well I enjoyed it so much I went out of my way to collect the whole series and I enjoyed every one of them, but when I was moving house I must have either chucked them out by mistake or missplaced them but now I am looking forward to collecting them again and will start with the Mars Triology
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Format: Mass Market Paperback
"The Warlord of Mars" by Edgar Rice Burroughs picks up where "The Gods of Mars" left off. This novel was published from December of 1913 to March of 1914 in "All-Story" as a serial, and then published as a novel in September of 1919. Unlike "A Princess of Mars", neither "The Gods of Mars" nor "The Warlord of Mars" can easily stand alone. The former volume ends in a cliff-hanger, and this novel relies on the reader knowing what is going on. Also, it is to the benefit of the reader to start with the first in the series to have a complete background for the entire story, though one could probably get by without it.

Unlike the first two books of the series, this one does not open with a forward in which the author presents the fantastic tale as true, but that undoubtedly is due to the fact that the story was left with a rather abrupt ending in the previous book. As with the previous installments of the series, there is plenty of action, and more than a few amazing coincidences, where John Carter just happens to be in the right spot at the right time to overhear a key piece of information, but in many ways that is what adds to the fun.

Burroughs continues to take the reader on a trek around the Red Planet. After covering the dead seas and meeting the Red and Green Martians in the first book, and then heading to the south pole in the second book to meet the White and Black Martians, it is not too big of surprise that in this book he heads to the polar north, and there we find yet another race, the Yellow Martians, and along with them a host of new enemies, and some new allies as well. There are also some new monsters to be faced in the north.

The story is basically one big chase seen, starting with John Carter following a Thurid, a black dator.
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By bernie TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 1 April 2010
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Sometimes the first three books are referred to as a trilogy as the first two books have cliff hangers. Of course we know this is not the end due to the number of book written.

In this part of the story we left John waiting at the Temple of the Sun. Everyone knows that he as not long to wait until his old nemeses' devise a plot of revenge. Soon John, while in the process of chasing the capturers of Dejah Thoris, will come up against untold and unfathomed barriers to the end of the world. Luckily he has old Woola at his side.

Reading this make you want to get out you sward and join in.

Still as with all places ruled by law, John will have to meet with the Judges of the Temple of Reward ad face the consequences of returning from the Valley of Dor and the Lost Sea of Korus. As no one can escape judgment.
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