Wanda Jackson

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RT @MexicanCheyenne: my iPod must be in some kinda mood... Amy Winehouse, Paloma Faith, Adele, Gin Wigmore and Wanda Jackson songs played 9 songs in a row LoL ��


At a Glance

Birthname: Wanda Lavonne Jackson
Nationality: American
Born: Oct 20 1937


Biography

Unfinished Business, the new album from legendary singer and “Rock and Roll Hall of Fame” inductee Wanda Jackson, will be released October 9 on Sugar Hill Records. This is Jackson’s 31st studio album and marks the producing debut of fellow renowned musician and songwriter Justin Townes Earle. Of working with Earle, Jackson comments, “From day one I really liked Justin’s idea to take me back to my roots and make a record of country, blues, and rockabilly songs. The band was extra tight and great to work with during the whole process. The record just sounds terrific and I’m hoping that my fans ... Read more

Unfinished Business, the new album from legendary singer and “Rock and Roll Hall of Fame” inductee Wanda Jackson, will be released October 9 on Sugar Hill Records. This is Jackson’s 31st studio album and marks the producing debut of fellow renowned musician and songwriter Justin Townes Earle. Of working with Earle, Jackson comments, “From day one I really liked Justin’s idea to take me back to my roots and make a record of country, blues, and rockabilly songs. The band was extra tight and great to work with during the whole process. The record just sounds terrific and I’m hoping that my fans enjoy listening to it as much as I enjoyed making it.”

Unfinished Business continues Jackson’s unparalleled five-and-a-half decades of influential and groundbreaking music making. Recorded in Nashville at House of David Studios in early 2012, the 10-song album features renditions of “California Stars” (Woody Guthrie, Jay Bennett, Jeff Tweedy), “Pushover” (Billy Davis and Tony Clarke), “It’s All Over Now” (Bobby Womack and Shirley Jean Womack) as well as a duet with Earle on “Am I Even A Memory” (Greg Garing). See reverse for complete track-listing.

The new album follows Jackson’s 2011 Jack White-produced The Party Ain’t Over, which received both widespread critical and commercial acclaim. Of the record, NPR Music raved “At 73, she still exudes a youthful sound and spirit, and decorates her unique voice with an effortlessly deep and gravelly swoop at the most unexpected times,” while The New York Times noted Jackson “still sounds fantastic, and her gnarled, feisty vocals are a good fit with Mr. White’s scrappy production.” Moreover, the album found Jackson enjoying her first ever charting on the Billboard 200 chart, peaking at #58. Jack White declared “[Jackson is] influential to every modern female singer, whether they know about her or not. She broke down those walls in the beginning, when it was the hardest to do.”

After performing to sold-out audiences across the country last year, including a 10-city tour supporting Adele, Jackson embarks on a series of performances this fall, including a special show at New York’s Highline Ballroom on October 12 (additional dates will be announced shortly). Critically praised for her recent live shows, The Los Angeles Times claims “…she’s still fired up with power and sass,” while the Minneapolis Star Tribune adds “Holy moly, what a powerhouse. This tiny woman in red fringe and jet black hair can still sing with the same power and pizazz of the girl a quarter her age. Her voice still shifts effortlessly from warbly to scratchy to clear as a bell, and still has that girly then sultry then girly then again sultry quality about it.”

WANDA JACKSON: UNFINISHED BUSINESS
by Stephen King

There were a lot of great female singers when I was growing up (you can’t call them all women, because Brenda Lee was just 15 when she had a rockabilly hit with “Sweet Nothin’s”), and I fell in love with most of them, from Connie Francis, who always had a sob in her voice, to Patsy Cline, who sang songs like “Crazy” with such sweet regret that you wanted to put your arms around her and tell her, “Shh, now, shh, baby, it’ll all be okay.” But there was never a singer quite like Wanda Jackson, one who could hold her own with rockabilly rebels like Gene Vincent and Jerry Lee Lewis any day of the week. She often wore a big white cowboy hat that made her look country, but when she opened her mouth and started to wail, you understood that chick had funk.

Now in her mid-70s, you’d think the one-time First Lady of Rockabilly would be either retired, or running on fumes. You’d be wrong on both counts. The lady is still performing, and…did I say something about running on fumes? Make that running on hi-test, as this album proves. A full tank. Wanda Jackson still has plenty of unfinished business, and big props go to Justin Townes Earle, who has given the set a stripped-down honky-tonk feel that’s by turns cheerfully explosive and melancholy.

What most delighted me about Unfinished Business is how it ignores genre boundaries, hitting all the Wanda Jackson sweet spots: rockabilly, country, pop, even gospel (“Two Hands,” a heart-lifting beauty written by the late Townes Van Zandt). Her rendition of “California Stars,” a Woody Guthrie-Jeff Tweedy collaboration I first heard on the album Mermaid Avenue, is sweet and unaffected, and her take on “Am I Even a Memory” (with a guest vocal from producer Earle) is an album standout, a classic country tune that ranks with the best of Tammy Wynette and Loretta Lynn: it makes you ache, brothers and sisters, and that’s just what it’s supposed to do. Why do you think the pedal steel always sounds like tears?

Then there are the classic chin-out tunes like “Push Over” and “Tore Down,” that recall Jackson classics like “Let’s Have a Party” and “Hot Dog! That Made Him Mad.” Jackson’s R&B side is on display in “It’s All Over Now”—maybe not quite the equal of the Bobby Womack version back in the day (I’m prejudiced, I admit it), but it shuts down the better-known Rolling Stones version. And I mean cold.

In the end, there’s not a thing a guy like me can say about music that’s as good as listening to the music. When it’s right, when it’s really in the groove, it’s like a bar of bright sunlight shafting into a previously dark room. Here is a one-of-a-kind voice as fresh now as it was in 1958. This album made me smile, chased out a tear or two, and occasionally brought on the goosebumps. A voice this big will never be living in the past. Wanda Jackson really does have a lot of unfinished business.

© 2012 Stephen King. All rights reserved.

This biography was provided by the artist or their representative.

Unfinished Business, the new album from legendary singer and “Rock and Roll Hall of Fame” inductee Wanda Jackson, will be released October 9 on Sugar Hill Records. This is Jackson’s 31st studio album and marks the producing debut of fellow renowned musician and songwriter Justin Townes Earle. Of working with Earle, Jackson comments, “From day one I really liked Justin’s idea to take me back to my roots and make a record of country, blues, and rockabilly songs. The band was extra tight and great to work with during the whole process. The record just sounds terrific and I’m hoping that my fans enjoy listening to it as much as I enjoyed making it.”

Unfinished Business continues Jackson’s unparalleled five-and-a-half decades of influential and groundbreaking music making. Recorded in Nashville at House of David Studios in early 2012, the 10-song album features renditions of “California Stars” (Woody Guthrie, Jay Bennett, Jeff Tweedy), “Pushover” (Billy Davis and Tony Clarke), “It’s All Over Now” (Bobby Womack and Shirley Jean Womack) as well as a duet with Earle on “Am I Even A Memory” (Greg Garing). See reverse for complete track-listing.

The new album follows Jackson’s 2011 Jack White-produced The Party Ain’t Over, which received both widespread critical and commercial acclaim. Of the record, NPR Music raved “At 73, she still exudes a youthful sound and spirit, and decorates her unique voice with an effortlessly deep and gravelly swoop at the most unexpected times,” while The New York Times noted Jackson “still sounds fantastic, and her gnarled, feisty vocals are a good fit with Mr. White’s scrappy production.” Moreover, the album found Jackson enjoying her first ever charting on the Billboard 200 chart, peaking at #58. Jack White declared “[Jackson is] influential to every modern female singer, whether they know about her or not. She broke down those walls in the beginning, when it was the hardest to do.”

After performing to sold-out audiences across the country last year, including a 10-city tour supporting Adele, Jackson embarks on a series of performances this fall, including a special show at New York’s Highline Ballroom on October 12 (additional dates will be announced shortly). Critically praised for her recent live shows, The Los Angeles Times claims “…she’s still fired up with power and sass,” while the Minneapolis Star Tribune adds “Holy moly, what a powerhouse. This tiny woman in red fringe and jet black hair can still sing with the same power and pizazz of the girl a quarter her age. Her voice still shifts effortlessly from warbly to scratchy to clear as a bell, and still has that girly then sultry then girly then again sultry quality about it.”

WANDA JACKSON: UNFINISHED BUSINESS
by Stephen King

There were a lot of great female singers when I was growing up (you can’t call them all women, because Brenda Lee was just 15 when she had a rockabilly hit with “Sweet Nothin’s”), and I fell in love with most of them, from Connie Francis, who always had a sob in her voice, to Patsy Cline, who sang songs like “Crazy” with such sweet regret that you wanted to put your arms around her and tell her, “Shh, now, shh, baby, it’ll all be okay.” But there was never a singer quite like Wanda Jackson, one who could hold her own with rockabilly rebels like Gene Vincent and Jerry Lee Lewis any day of the week. She often wore a big white cowboy hat that made her look country, but when she opened her mouth and started to wail, you understood that chick had funk.

Now in her mid-70s, you’d think the one-time First Lady of Rockabilly would be either retired, or running on fumes. You’d be wrong on both counts. The lady is still performing, and…did I say something about running on fumes? Make that running on hi-test, as this album proves. A full tank. Wanda Jackson still has plenty of unfinished business, and big props go to Justin Townes Earle, who has given the set a stripped-down honky-tonk feel that’s by turns cheerfully explosive and melancholy.

What most delighted me about Unfinished Business is how it ignores genre boundaries, hitting all the Wanda Jackson sweet spots: rockabilly, country, pop, even gospel (“Two Hands,” a heart-lifting beauty written by the late Townes Van Zandt). Her rendition of “California Stars,” a Woody Guthrie-Jeff Tweedy collaboration I first heard on the album Mermaid Avenue, is sweet and unaffected, and her take on “Am I Even a Memory” (with a guest vocal from producer Earle) is an album standout, a classic country tune that ranks with the best of Tammy Wynette and Loretta Lynn: it makes you ache, brothers and sisters, and that’s just what it’s supposed to do. Why do you think the pedal steel always sounds like tears?

Then there are the classic chin-out tunes like “Push Over” and “Tore Down,” that recall Jackson classics like “Let’s Have a Party” and “Hot Dog! That Made Him Mad.” Jackson’s R&B side is on display in “It’s All Over Now”—maybe not quite the equal of the Bobby Womack version back in the day (I’m prejudiced, I admit it), but it shuts down the better-known Rolling Stones version. And I mean cold.

In the end, there’s not a thing a guy like me can say about music that’s as good as listening to the music. When it’s right, when it’s really in the groove, it’s like a bar of bright sunlight shafting into a previously dark room. Here is a one-of-a-kind voice as fresh now as it was in 1958. This album made me smile, chased out a tear or two, and occasionally brought on the goosebumps. A voice this big will never be living in the past. Wanda Jackson really does have a lot of unfinished business.

© 2012 Stephen King. All rights reserved.

This biography was provided by the artist or their representative.

Unfinished Business, the new album from legendary singer and “Rock and Roll Hall of Fame” inductee Wanda Jackson, will be released October 9 on Sugar Hill Records. This is Jackson’s 31st studio album and marks the producing debut of fellow renowned musician and songwriter Justin Townes Earle. Of working with Earle, Jackson comments, “From day one I really liked Justin’s idea to take me back to my roots and make a record of country, blues, and rockabilly songs. The band was extra tight and great to work with during the whole process. The record just sounds terrific and I’m hoping that my fans enjoy listening to it as much as I enjoyed making it.”

Unfinished Business continues Jackson’s unparalleled five-and-a-half decades of influential and groundbreaking music making. Recorded in Nashville at House of David Studios in early 2012, the 10-song album features renditions of “California Stars” (Woody Guthrie, Jay Bennett, Jeff Tweedy), “Pushover” (Billy Davis and Tony Clarke), “It’s All Over Now” (Bobby Womack and Shirley Jean Womack) as well as a duet with Earle on “Am I Even A Memory” (Greg Garing). See reverse for complete track-listing.

The new album follows Jackson’s 2011 Jack White-produced The Party Ain’t Over, which received both widespread critical and commercial acclaim. Of the record, NPR Music raved “At 73, she still exudes a youthful sound and spirit, and decorates her unique voice with an effortlessly deep and gravelly swoop at the most unexpected times,” while The New York Times noted Jackson “still sounds fantastic, and her gnarled, feisty vocals are a good fit with Mr. White’s scrappy production.” Moreover, the album found Jackson enjoying her first ever charting on the Billboard 200 chart, peaking at #58. Jack White declared “[Jackson is] influential to every modern female singer, whether they know about her or not. She broke down those walls in the beginning, when it was the hardest to do.”

After performing to sold-out audiences across the country last year, including a 10-city tour supporting Adele, Jackson embarks on a series of performances this fall, including a special show at New York’s Highline Ballroom on October 12 (additional dates will be announced shortly). Critically praised for her recent live shows, The Los Angeles Times claims “…she’s still fired up with power and sass,” while the Minneapolis Star Tribune adds “Holy moly, what a powerhouse. This tiny woman in red fringe and jet black hair can still sing with the same power and pizazz of the girl a quarter her age. Her voice still shifts effortlessly from warbly to scratchy to clear as a bell, and still has that girly then sultry then girly then again sultry quality about it.”

WANDA JACKSON: UNFINISHED BUSINESS
by Stephen King

There were a lot of great female singers when I was growing up (you can’t call them all women, because Brenda Lee was just 15 when she had a rockabilly hit with “Sweet Nothin’s”), and I fell in love with most of them, from Connie Francis, who always had a sob in her voice, to Patsy Cline, who sang songs like “Crazy” with such sweet regret that you wanted to put your arms around her and tell her, “Shh, now, shh, baby, it’ll all be okay.” But there was never a singer quite like Wanda Jackson, one who could hold her own with rockabilly rebels like Gene Vincent and Jerry Lee Lewis any day of the week. She often wore a big white cowboy hat that made her look country, but when she opened her mouth and started to wail, you understood that chick had funk.

Now in her mid-70s, you’d think the one-time First Lady of Rockabilly would be either retired, or running on fumes. You’d be wrong on both counts. The lady is still performing, and…did I say something about running on fumes? Make that running on hi-test, as this album proves. A full tank. Wanda Jackson still has plenty of unfinished business, and big props go to Justin Townes Earle, who has given the set a stripped-down honky-tonk feel that’s by turns cheerfully explosive and melancholy.

What most delighted me about Unfinished Business is how it ignores genre boundaries, hitting all the Wanda Jackson sweet spots: rockabilly, country, pop, even gospel (“Two Hands,” a heart-lifting beauty written by the late Townes Van Zandt). Her rendition of “California Stars,” a Woody Guthrie-Jeff Tweedy collaboration I first heard on the album Mermaid Avenue, is sweet and unaffected, and her take on “Am I Even a Memory” (with a guest vocal from producer Earle) is an album standout, a classic country tune that ranks with the best of Tammy Wynette and Loretta Lynn: it makes you ache, brothers and sisters, and that’s just what it’s supposed to do. Why do you think the pedal steel always sounds like tears?

Then there are the classic chin-out tunes like “Push Over” and “Tore Down,” that recall Jackson classics like “Let’s Have a Party” and “Hot Dog! That Made Him Mad.” Jackson’s R&B side is on display in “It’s All Over Now”—maybe not quite the equal of the Bobby Womack version back in the day (I’m prejudiced, I admit it), but it shuts down the better-known Rolling Stones version. And I mean cold.

In the end, there’s not a thing a guy like me can say about music that’s as good as listening to the music. When it’s right, when it’s really in the groove, it’s like a bar of bright sunlight shafting into a previously dark room. Here is a one-of-a-kind voice as fresh now as it was in 1958. This album made me smile, chased out a tear or two, and occasionally brought on the goosebumps. A voice this big will never be living in the past. Wanda Jackson really does have a lot of unfinished business.

© 2012 Stephen King. All rights reserved.

This biography was provided by the artist or their representative.

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