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Wake (WWW Trilogy) Audio CD – Audiobook, 30 Mar 2010

3.4 out of 5 stars 14 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Audio CD
  • Publisher: Brilliance Audio; Unabridged edition (30 Mar. 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1441843507
  • ISBN-13: 978-1441843500
  • Product Dimensions: 12.7 x 3.5 x 17.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (14 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 5,708,990 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Robert J. Sawyer has been described as Canada's answer to Michael Crichton. Critically acclaimed in the US he is regarded as one of SF's most significant writers and his novels are regularly voted as fan's favourites. He lives in Canada.

Product Description

Book Description

What happens when the internet comes alive? An SF thriller of terrifying possibilities. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

About the Author

Robert Sawyer is one of only seven SF writers ever to have won the three major awards for best novel - the Hugo, the Nebula and the John W. Campbell. He has also won the top SF awards in Canada, China, France, Japan and Spain. The author of 17 novels he was born in Canada in 1960 and lives in Ontario. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.


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Customer Reviews

3.4 out of 5 stars
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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
In typical Sawyer fashion, a scientific development is examined by putting a handful of sympathetic characters through a life-changing experience--in this case we follow the fortunes of Caitlin in the present time. A brilliant young mathematician who has managed to find her way around the web using a series of unique strategies, she is believable and well-drawn, as are her family and the Japanese doctor treating her. Sawyer's scene setting is pitch perfect and I enjoyed the touches of humour regarding the relationship between America and Canada. The sub-plot depicting the plight of Hobo, a bonobo/chimpanzee cross is equally engrossing and addresses the subject of growing self-awareness from an intriguing angle - which is one of Sawyer's strengths.

However, if you're sensing a `but', you'd be right. The book opens in the viewpoint of the worldwide web and for me, this particular `character' failed to convince me until right at the very end when the writing and delivery was finally plausible. I have no problem with the idea of the Net becoming self-aware, indeed, I think that Sawyer does a masterful job in stacking up a tenable set of circumstances that jolt it into consciousness. What bothers me is the depiction of the Net `character'. In my opinion, the writing, with the choice of vocabulary, phrasing and thought process just did not sufficiently reflect the reality of what `It' is. I'm aware that it was a fiendishly difficult task to pull off and, ironically, if Sawyer had been less able at setting up such a realistic scenario, then this weakness would not be so glaringly obvious. Apart from this one reservation, the book is an intriguing exploration into what causes self-awareness--and I'm quite sure that during the other two books in the trilogy, 'Watch' and 'Wonder', Sawyer will continue to offer thought provoking insights into the consequences of a sentient being running the world wide web.
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By Gareth Wilson - Falcata Times Blog TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 16 Jan. 2010
Format: Paperback
Wake is another future classic from Robert and the start of a news series for him, in which the principle protagonist learns to see the web and learns of the consiousness stirring within.

As with Flash Forward its beautifully sculpted. The characters a triumph especially with the care and consideration of the protagonista which I really love with an overall story arc that just flows from the page into the readers imagination. Add to this an attention to detail and research that really will make you grasp without the utilisation of an info dump and I think that Robert will be a name to flag as perhaps one of the future names to judge the genre by.

Imaginative, Creative and hopefully one that will inspire readers to reach for thier dreams in much the same way Clarke or Asimov have for previous generations.
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Format: Paperback
Unfortunately, this is Robert Sawyer's book that I like least. The reason why I like his other books is that he takes an idea or event, and then describes its consequences for society and individuals. The idea or event is generally reasonably plausible, and the consequences are quite logical. This makes his books not some wild fantasy, but quite believable. "Wake" has a much narrower scope. It is mainly about one teenage girl, who discovers a new intelligence via the internet. The consequences of this for society don't play a role in the book, and there is very little of what it means for others than Caitlin Decter. I find that a pity. I also find the character of Caitlin Decter not very interesting. Compared to the main characters in his other books, she is much less interesting. Maybe this is because she is a teenager and has much less personal history, but that is neither here nor there.
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By SonicQuack VINE VOICE on 6 Sept. 2010
Format: Paperback
Wake contains two stories which dance alongside each other until their collision in the latter part of the novel. The first plot follows a web savvy blind girl who becomes the recipient of an experimental implant. The second strand follows the emergence of something within the web-space itself. Whereas Caitlin's story is full of emotion, interesting characters and creative near-future ideas, the other story is cold and calculated, rooted in maths and science and feels sterile alongside a tale rooted in humanity. This creates an imbalance, although deliberate, which is distracting. Caitlin's tale could have been a standalone tale and although it may not have contained as much science fiction, it would have engaged the reader with a more captivating story.
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Format: Paperback
Once I read 'Wake', the first book in the trilogy, I 'had' to read the other two because the implications of the story are so intriguing that I wanted to know what was next. Intriguing pretty much like a blockbuster can be with lots of action and shallow characters though.

If you're a geek and don't care too much about poetry, you'll like it.
There are some very good points about the internet, and its evolution toward a sentient being is something anyone interested in sci-fi, h+, tech trends etc, is inevitably attracted to.

If you love good literature and in books you look for poetry, then it'll disappoint you.
The characters are shallow, and few details are given about them. Even when they're given, they tend to stick to eye colours and superficial stuff like that. The book is a never-ending sequence of actions, as you would see in an action movie. In fact, it feels more like a script than a book. It's very visual, and leaves nothing to the other senses. No character ever seems to have time for pondering and introspection, since everyone is trapped in this lunatic cage of constant action. There is no poetic image in over 1,000 pages. It feels like it's being written by a scientist with no artistic gift.

This is a successful book, and its author is a successful author. Why?
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