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Wait till Next Year Paperback – 22 Jun 1998

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Product details

  • Paperback: 272 pages
  • Publisher: Pocket Books (22 Jun. 1998)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0684847957
  • ISBN-13: 978-0684847955
  • Product Dimensions: 14 x 1.8 x 21.4 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (60 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 546,824 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Doris Kearns Goodwin is the doyenne of US presidential historians, and one of the most acclaimed non-fiction authors in the world. She won the Pulitzer Prize for History in 1995.

Product Description

Review

"As the tenured radicals attempt to rewrite our nation's history, the warm, witty, eloquent personal testimony of someone of Doris Kearns Goodwin's stature is well worth reading." --Maggie Gallagher," The Baltimore Sun"

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WHEN I WAS SIX, my father gave me a bright-red scorebook that opened my heart to the game of baseball. Read the first page
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Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Mary Whipple HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWER on 28 Dec. 2005
Format: Paperback
In 1949, when Doris Kearns was six and living in Rockville Center, NY, her father taught her how to chart and score a baseball game, the primary (radio) entertainment of her community. In these years, it was baseball that unified the local community, though whether one was loyal to the Brooklyn Dodgers, as Kearns was, the NY Yankees, or the NY Giants was a different matter. For Kearns Goodwin, the youngest in the family, it was baseball which served as her ritual connection to her father, since she sat with him after dinner each night and related the scoring of that day's game.
It is to these baseball narratives that she attributes her early interest in data collection and in story-telling (since she discovered her father stayed interested when she could keep him in suspense), traits which she believes helped make her the world-renowned historian she has become. As she describes her life during 1949 - 1956, when either the Dodgers or the Giants played in the World Series, usually against the NY Yankees, she connects her life at home and in the community with her fierce love of the Dodgers, and especially her hero, Jackie Robinson.
Showing how team loyalties were related to the social structure of her town, Kearns Goodwin characterizes the friendly rivalries within the community. Becoming the official "window" scorekeeper one summer for the local butcher shop, in which the two butchers, Giants fans, kept the neighbors up to date re the Giants record, Kearns Goodwin ("Ragmop"), then eight, was the "official" scorekeeper for the Dodgers. The high point of her baseball "fan-dom" was the Dodgers win over the Yankees in 1955 for the World Series championship, when she was twelve.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 24 Aug. 1999
Format: Paperback
Having grown up in Brooklyn, but being 15 years younger than Mrs. Goodwin, I did not have the pleasure of experiencing the 3-way NY baseball rivalry of the '50s. I only had stories to live on. Mrs. Goodwin's books allowed me to vicariously live through her experiences as an avid baseball fan. The closeness of her family, and of her friends, neighbors, local merchants, seems to epitomize the stereotypical suburban life of the decade. Certainly her mother's ill health was an ever-present cloud shading all circumstances of her life, but I had the feeling, all through the book, that I certainly hoped Mrs. Goodwin has a clear realization of how good her life was, how fortunate and how privileged. Those of us who did not escape Brooklyn, in fact were stuck in public housing (more along the lines of what was depicted in the film "Radiant City") would have given anything for her modest home in Rockville Centre and all its trappings. She has wonderful memories, and I'm glad she elected to share them with the rest of us.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 2 Jan. 1998
Format: Hardcover
Doris Kearns Goodwin has written an endearing book on her growing up in the fifties. My 10 plus rating certainly has been effected by the fact that I too grew up in the fifties, was a Brooklyn Dodger fan, and was raised Catholic. Her relationship with her father and mother stand out to me. Prospective parents would benefit from reading about how she received love from both her mother and her father despite past and present family difficulties. During the early fifties it seemed like the Dodgers were never going to win a World Series. But in 1955 it finally happened. Ms. Goodwin writes so vividly about the day of the Brooklyn victory in October of that year. The agony of the Bobby Thompson homer, the scare of polio, her innocent and diverse neighborhood, the fear of nuclear attack, the beauty of non-free-agent, non-exhorbitant salary baseball are all deftly written about. Her first confession and first communion stories will be enjoyed whether or not you know much about the pre-Vatican II Catholic church. I found myself laughing and crying a lot as walked through Doris' childhood. I really regretted reaching the last page knowing the journey and the joy had come to an end.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 21 April 1999
Format: Paperback
I loved this book from cover to cover. It reminded me of my youthful days in good old Brooklyn. She is forgiven for not mentioning Dan Bankhead as the second negro player on the Dodgers, first Black pitcher (not Don Newcombe) in the Majors and the the first Black ball player to hit a home run at his first time at bat, I know, I was at the game at Ebbets field in 1947 as a 15 year old kid.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 27 Aug. 1999
Format: Hardcover
If you want a book all about the Brooklyn Dodgers, read Peter Golenbock's "Bums" or Roger Kahn's "The Boys of Summer" or "The Era". Doris Goodwin has woven the Dodgers into her memoir in just the right amount. Well-written and evocative of a much different time than the '90s, it's well worth reading.
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By A Customer on 13 Jan. 1998
Format: Hardcover
Doris Kearns Goodwin is famous for her biographies, especially the Pulitzer Prize winning, NO ORDINARY TIME. Her new book, though, is not about someone else's life, it's about her own. "When I was six, my father gave me a bright-red score book that opened my heart to the game of baseball." Goodwin begins to recall the game that was her childhood into this "score book". Although the cover of her memoir, WAIT TILL NEXT YEAR, is not bright-red, it serves it's purpose well. Goodwin writes a "play by play" account of her life from the time she first recieved that score book till the end of her childhood at age fifteen. Underlying it all is her passion for baseball and the New York Dodgers and her hope that they will win the World Series. The author attributes her love of narration to baseball. Every day, Goodwin would recount to her father, using the system he taught her, that day's game as he got her ready for bed. As well as a sign of her father's love, this ritual introduced her to the art of storytelling. "It would instill me in an early awareness of the power of the narrative, which would introduce me to a lifetime of storytelling..." This book is filled with poignant stories about the relationships between the author and her family and friends. It also draws on the many experiences of Goodwin's from her first trip to Ebbet's Field, to her hero, Jackie Robinson. There are stories about her religious experiences as a Catholic, her obsession with James Dean and how, at first, television brought her neighborhood together. The significance of the era is portrayed well. For me, this book was particularly interesting because of my own love of baseball. Just reading it made me long for those hot summer days when major league baseball is played.Read more ›
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