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Wagner: Das Rheingold (Mariinsky Orchestra/Gergiev) [Double CD, Hybrid SACD, SACD]

Nikolai Putilin Audio CD
4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
Price: £21.00 & FREE Delivery in the UK. Details
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Product details

  • Conductor: Valery Gergiev
  • Composer: Wagner
  • Audio CD (2 Sep 2013)
  • Please Note: Requires SACD-compatible hardware
  • Number of Discs: 2
  • Format: Double CD, Hybrid SACD, SACD
  • Label: Mariinsky
  • ASIN: B00D93NFMU
  • Other Editions: MP3 Download
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 104,521 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

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Songs from this album are available to purchase as MP3s. Click on "Buy MP3" or view the MP3 Album.
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                         


Disc 1:

Samples
Song TitleArtist Time Price
Listen  1. Das Rheingold, Scene I: VorspielRené Pape, Nikolai Putilin, Stephan Rügamer 3:54£0.99  Buy MP3 
Listen  2. Das Rheingold, Scene I: "Weia! Waga! Woge, du welle!"Nikolai Putilin 2:31£0.99  Buy MP3 
Listen  3. Das Rheingold, Scene I: "Garstig glatter glitschriger Glimmer"Nikolai Putilin 5:25£0.99  Buy MP3 
Listen  4. Das Rheingold, Scene I: "Wallala! Lalaleia!"Nikolai Putilin 2:36£0.99  Buy MP3 
Listen  5. Das Rheingold, Scene I: "Lugt, Schwestern!"Nikolai Putilin 6:25£0.99  Buy MP3 
Listen  6. Das Rheingold, Scene I: "Der Welt Erbe gewann' ich zu eigen durch dich?"Nikolai Putilin 5:38£0.99  Buy MP3 
Listen  7. Das Rheingold, Scene II: "Wotan, Gemahl! Erwache!"Ekaterina Gubanova, René Pape 9:28£0.99  Buy MP3 
Listen  8. Das Rheingold, Scene II: "Sanft schloss Schlaf dein Aug'"René Pape 7:57£0.99  Buy MP3 
Listen  9. Das Rheingold, Scene II: "Zu mir, Freia! Meide sie, Frecher!"Ekaterina Gubanova, René Pape, Stephan Rügamer 5:58£0.99  Buy MP3 
Listen10. Das Rheingold, Scene II: "Umsonst, sucht' ich und sehe"Ekaterina Gubanova, René Pape, Stephan Rügamer 6:50£0.99  Buy MP3 
Listen11. Das Rheingold, Scene II: "Ein Runenzauber zwingt das Gold zum Reif"Ekaterina Gubanova, René Pape, Stephan Rügamer 3:19£0.99  Buy MP3 
Listen12. Das Rheingold, Scene II: "Hor, Wotan, der Harrenden Wort!"René Pape, Stephan Rügamer 2:34£0.99  Buy MP3 
Listen13. Das Rheingold, Scene II: "Was sinnt nun Wotan so wild?"Ekaterina Gubanova, Stephan Rügamer 4:50£0.99  Buy MP3 
Listen14. Das Rheingold, Scene II: "Auf, Loge! Hinab mit mir!"Ekaterina Gubanova, Nikolai Putilin, René Pape, Stephan Rügamer 4:48£0.99  Buy MP3 


Disc 2:

Samples
Song TitleArtist Time Price
Listen  1. Das Rheingold, Scene III: "Schau, du Schelm!"Nikolai Putilin 2:44£0.99  Buy MP3 
Listen  2. Das Rheingold, Scene III: "Nibelheim hier. Durch bleiche Nebel"René Pape, Stephan Rügamer 4:29£0.99  Buy MP3 
Listen  3. Das Rheingold, Scene III: "Nehmt euch in acht! Alberich naht"Nikolai Putilin, René Pape, Stephan Rügamer 7:41£0.99  Buy MP3 
Listen  4. Das Rheingold, Scene III: "Vergeh, frevelnder Gauch! Was sagt der?"Nikolai Putilin, René Pape, Stephan Rügamer 4:47£0.99  Buy MP3 
Listen  5. Das Rheingold, Scene III: "Ohe! Hahaha! Schreckliche Schlange"Nikolai Putilin, René Pape, Stephan Rügamer 5:59£0.99  Buy MP3 
Listen  6. Das Rheingold, Scene IV: "Da Vetter, sitze du fest!"Nikolai Putilin, René Pape, Stephan Rügamer 4:44£0.99  Buy MP3 
Listen  7. Das Rheingold, Scene IV: "Gezahlt hab' ich; nun last mich zieh'n!"Nikolai Putilin, René Pape, Stephan Rügamer 5:53£0.99  Buy MP3 
Listen  8. Das Rheingold, Scene IV: "Bin ich nun frei? Wirklich frei?"Nikolai Putilin, René Pape, Stephan Rügamer 3:44£0.99  Buy MP3 
Listen  9. Das Rheingold, Scene IV: "Fasolt und Fafner nahen von fern"Ekaterina Gubanova, René Pape, Stephan Rügamer 5:05£0.99  Buy MP3 
Listen10. Das Rheingold, Scene IV: "Gepflanzt sind die Pfahle Mass"Ekaterina Gubanova, René Pape, Stephan Rügamer 6:10£0.99  Buy MP3 
Listen11. Das Rheingold, Scene IV: "Weiche, Wotan! Weiche!"Ekaterina Gubanova, René Pape 5:39£0.99  Buy MP3 
Listen12. Das Rheingold, Scene IV: "Hort ihr Riesen! Zuruck, und harret!"Ekaterina Gubanova, René Pape, Stephan Rügamer 6:49£0.99  Buy MP3 
Listen13. Das Rheingold, Scene IV: "Schwules Gedunst schwebt in der Luft"Ekaterina Gubanova, René Pape, Stephan Rügamer 4:13£0.99  Buy MP3 
Listen14. Das Rheingold, Scene IV: "Abendlich strahlt der Sonne Auge"Ekaterina Gubanova, René Pape, Stephan Rügamer 4:05£0.99  Buy MP3 
Listen15. Das Rheingold, Scene IV: "Rheingold! Rheingold! Reines Gold!"René Pape, Stephan Rügamer 3:11£0.99  Buy MP3 


Product Description

Review

Impassioned conducting… This is a performance that one would be quite happy to encounter in the opera house…one would welcome this release. --Paul Corfield Godfrey, MusicWeb International- November 2013

Product Description

MAR 0526; MARIINSKY - RUSSIA; Classica Lirica

Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars
4.2 out of 5 stars
Most Helpful Customer Reviews
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
By D. S. CROWE TOP 500 REVIEWER
Format:Audio CD|Verified Purchase
Having rushed to judgement with the first instalment of this cycle, I have taken a long, hard listen to this set to ensure that I was not carried away by my enthusiasm of hearing the work so beautifully sung as I was with Gergiev's Walkure. Longer acquaintance with that set has brought home to me that despite the undoubted beauty -by modern standards-of the singing and playing, and the excellent recording-those who found it lacking in drama have a good case. It is a bit staid in its overall characterisation, and perhaps 4 stars would have been a more realistic appraisal.

I am delighted to advise that there are no such reservations with Das Rheingold, which is again beautifully sung and even better played and recorded. Certainly, Gergiev takes a measured and darker approach to this work than many, but I feel that he captures the essence of it wonderfully.

Many observers bemoan the homogenisation of orchestral sound that has developed over the last 40 years-where are those horns that sounded like saxophones in French orchestras and the braying, tinny brass of Slavic orchestras?-but it is fair to observe that the former Kirov orchestra does maintain some of the characteristics of Russian orchestras that use to endear and exasperate in equal measure. There is still the slight sharp edge to the trumpets (though the horns are wonderful) and a metallic glint to the strings that let us know we're not in Germany! This is an observation not a criticism as the playing on this set is one of its finest features, and the recording is spacious with a wide dynamic range.
The cast is all Russian bar Wotan and Loge, sung here by René Pape and Stephan Rugamer respectively.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Very beautiful 'Rheingold' 28 Sep 2013
Format:Audio CD|Verified Purchase
I very much enjoyed this first installment of Valery Gergiev's Ring Cycle. Usually I am guilty of concentrating on the vocals in an opera recording but this time, it was the orchestral playing that blew me away. I have listened to a few 'Rheingolds' (although by no means all of them) and I think this may be one of the most beautiful I've heard. The recording is clear and the orchestra transparent - I heard things in the score I've never heard before - it was lovely! On the vocal side, the women are all very good, especially Ekaterina Gubanova as a young and alluring Fricka. It took me a little longer to warm to the men. As Alberich, Nikolai Putilin does not have a beautiful voice BUT he does make good use of the words. The same can be said for Stephan Rugamer as an unusually light and mellifluous Loge - indeed some of the most dramatic scenes in the recording are when these two characters come together in scenes three and four. Even Rene Pape's Wotan comes to dramatic life in these scenes - otherwise he sings beautifully but with little attempt at acting. Actually, as in Gergiev's 'Walkure', I found myself a bit disappointed with Pape. For me, he is a little too light of voice for the role and yet the high notes still do not seem to come easily to him. Of the minor male roles; Alexei Markov does well in his 'big moment' with the hammer, both the giants are a bit on the lightweight side, Mime overacts a bit and Froh is easily the weakest link in the ensemble.

I also own the Solti Ring and I doubt if anything can compare for sheer theatrical entertainment - as well as a terrific veteran cast. This recording has none of the special effects - no screaming Nibelungs or howling Rhinemaidens, Alberich does not burst into maniacal laughter as he absconds with the gold and Donner's hammer strike is pretty dull BUT I think its a pretty good counterpart to the Solti just for sheer beauty of sound...and the rest of the Cycle has Nina Stemme as Brunnhilde!!
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Erm, a bit ho-hum! 9 Sep 2013
Format:Audio CD|Verified Purchase
If you find Janowski a bit too exciting, then this Gergiev Mariinsky Rheingold is for you. There is nothing actually wrong with it, save some diction issues with Freia, some rather odd sudden volume changes, especially at the entrance of Fafner and Fasolt (which is taken at a wonderfully slow huge tread), and some rather clumsy playing from the principal trumpet. The pluses are the imperious Wotan of Rene Pape, sounding a lot like the young Tomlinson but without the bark, a very fine Fricka, and a sensuous Erda, good Rhinemaidens and overall reasonably fine orchestral playing (but see above). The rest is, well, average. I personally found Loge's voice irritating and Mime sounded very, well, abused! It is possible that the final verdict on Gergiev's Wagner conducting should wait until this Ring Cycle is complete but so far, I do not find his reading of the Ring to date as compulsive as his Parsifal, nor as well rounded nor, dare I say, as beautiful sonically. There are many finer versions of Rheingold around, including Simone Young's Hamburg recording, Thielemann's Bayreuth recording, plus of course the superlative Solti/Vienna set which remains, amazingly, a benchmark. Karajan too is good; Keilberth's Bayreuth recording is slightly marred by odd stage sounds; Barenboim's Bayreuth reading is also excellent; other great readings are invariably now available just as parts of the complete Cycle. Meanwhile the Gergiev set is a bit in the middle of the pack right now, but maybe his Siegfried and Gotterdammerung will be rather more epic: let's hope so. However, having just sat through the excruciatingly awful Castorf/Bayreuth Ring, it is fair to say that I found the clarity and sobriety of Gergiev to be not totally unwelcome!
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 4.6 out of 5 stars  7 reviews
7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Perhaps the best modern Rheingold, largely because of the consistent, wonderful singing 12 Sep 2013
By Santa Fe Listener - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD
Skeptics will be reluctant to believe that this performance is as good as it is. To be most sympathetic to Gergiev's Wagner, you have to consider the almost total ban on Wagner's operas in the Soviet era, part of a well-earned antipathy to Germany after two annihilating wars. Using his power as czar of music in St. Petersburg, Gergiev has been rehabilitating many dropped strands of the standard repertoire, but it can't be said that his Ring cycle shows a lived-in quality so far as reaching into a deep tradition. Of course, I may just be rationalizing a favorite conductor - Gergiev's lumpish, slack Walkure, which opened this ongoing cycle based on live concert performances with the superb Mariinsky orchestra, seriously let down a world-class singing cast.

Here we move on to a much easier opera, Das Rheingold, which can be successfully mounted by any established opera house (no worries about underpowered Brunnhildes and Siegfrieds struggling to be heard). My complaints are few but not minor: I get the old fish-out-of-water feeling from Gergiev as the performance begins, where the Rhinemaidens sound jaunty rather than seductive, the rhythms skip along, and Alberich seems miffed rather than tantalized, outraged, and finally despairing. Gergiev skates over the wrenching moment when Alberich steals the gold by renouncing love forever - why isn't this a deeply moving moment? Certainly the stable of Mariinsky singers, who must have sung in several staged Ring cycles, are very fine; the Alberich of Nikolai Putilin is vocally very satisfying, but he hasn't been spurred to create a compelling character.

In the second scene a very mild-mannered Fricka (Ekaterina Gubanova) awakens her husband almost timidly. There's no denying the beauty and authority of Rene Pape's Wotan, but backed by Gergiev's uninvolved conducting, he comes off at first as a great voice searching for a dramatic reason to sing. Once the alarmed family of the gods enter, however, threatened by Fafner and Fasolt, Gergiev perks up, and I must say that all the singing is impressive, with an especially engaging portrayal of Loge from the sweet-voiced Stephan Rügamer. As for the giants, who could better the two superlative Mariinsky basses, Evgeny Nikitin and Mikhail Petrenko? You can forgive the cast for not being great vocal actors; in our era of diminished Wagner singing, this cast is like a return to paradise.

The best news is that the performance continues to warm up, and the singers are consistently superior to the cast on the most recent rival, Marek Janowski's Berlin recording, also done in concert, which I liked for its dramatic momentum. When a bitter, defiant Alberich is released from his bonds, Putilin's singing is thrilling and dramatically riveting. There are many moments like this, and they serve to cover Gergiev's tracks. He still fails to deliver the great orchestral passages at the heights of Furtwangler, Karajan, and Klemperer (and Donner's hammer is unforgivably silent). In the end, however, this is the best modern Rheingold for its glorious singing, beautiful playing, and ear-ravishing recorded sound. On balance, I might even rank it above one of the recognized classics, Solti's 1959 Vienna recording on Decca.

René Pape (Wotan), Nikolai Putilin (Alberich), Stephan Rügamer (Loge), Ekaterina Gubanova (Fricka), Viktoria Yastrebova (Freia), Zlata Bulycheva (Erda), Andrei Popov (Mime), Evgeny Nikitin (Fafner), Mikhail Petrenko (Fafner), Sergei Semishkur (Froh), Alexei Markov (Donner), Zhanna Dombrovskaya (Woglinde), Irina Vasilieva (Wellgunde), Ekaterina Sergeeva (Flosshilde)

Mariinsky Orchestra, Valéry Gergiev
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Gergiev constructs a Rheingold of inexorable power and grandeur, exquisitely sung and played, and rivalling the very best! 16 Oct 2013
By D. S. CROWE - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD
Having rushed to judgement with the first instalment of this cycle, I have taken a long, hard listen to this set to ensure that I was not carried away by my enthusiasm of hearing the work so beautifully sung as I was with Gergiev's Walkure. Longer acquaintance with that set has brought home to me that despite the undoubted beauty -by modern standards-of the singing and playing, and the excellent recording-those who found it lacking in drama have a good case. It is a bit staid in its overall characterisation, and perhaps 4 stars would have been a more realistic appraisal.

I am delighted to advise that there are no such reservations with Das Rheingold, which is again beautifully sung and even better played and recorded. Certainly, Gergiev takes a measured and darker approach to this work than many, but I feel that he captures the essence of it wonderfully.

Many observers bemoan the homogenisation of orchestral sound that has developed over the last 40 years-where are those horns that sounded like saxophones in French orchestras and the braying, tinny brass of Slavic orchestras?-but it is fair to observe that the former Kirov orchestra does maintain some of the characteristics of Russian orchestras that use to endear and exasperate in equal measure. There is still the slight sharp edge to the trumpets (though the horns are wonderful) and a metallic glint to the strings that let us know we're not in Germany! This is an observation not a criticism as the playing on this set is one of its finest features, and the recording is spacious with a wide dynamic range.
The cast is all Russian bar Wotan and Loge, sung here by René Pape and Stephan Rugamer respectively. Pape captures well the nobility and lofty insouciance of the young Wotan, for which character his voice is ideal, better suited than in Walkure and Rugamer provides a well sung, intelligent Loge, full of character and lyrical beauty offset by a real sense of lurking danger.
His "who knows what I'll do?" carriers real menace.
Nikolai Putilin was the most terrifying of Klingsors on Gergiev's Parsifal, and here he gives us a fiery, bad tempered Alberich which is well sung and well acted, especially in the curse scene.
There is a trend nowadays to make Alberich totally unsympathetic as he is here, but my own view is that was not what Wagner intended. He was fond of this character -the first scene in Act 2 of Siegfried is totally unnecessary in terms of the drama, but Wagner wanted to bring back a character for whom he had affection-the little man from the dark depths who craved acceptance in the upper echelons of the light but was rejected, duped and humiliated for all his ambition!
Neidlinger captures this to perfection, as do Pernerstofer, Nimsgern, and Wlaschica but only Wolfgang Koch seems currently to following this style of injecting some sardonic humour into Alberich.
Nevertheless, it's a great performance and unlike Schmuckenbecher for Janowski, he sings the role with assured steadiness.
The giants are mightily impressive as one would expect from Evegeny Nikitin and Mikhael Petrenko, and Gergiev ushers them in with a lumbering massively slow tread that outdoes even Furtwangler for sheer imposing weight, but he picks up the tempo for Fasolt's narration. Donner and Froh are good, though Sergei Semishkur has a classic pinched and nasal Russian tenor voice which takes one aback-but he sings well and ushers the Gods over the Rainbow Bridge beautifully.
The women are ALL excellent-in tune, mellifluous-and very Russian sounding in a good way!
Gubanova's Fricka is a very intelligent, powerful Goddess who is bitingly scornful and Bulycheva's Erda is one the finest I've heard-full of foreboding and power, while wonderfully alluring.
The Rhinemaidens are a very feisty bunch of sirens, very much "in your face" in the concert recording, but they sing with beauty and allure. The Mime and Freia make much of their smaller parts.
From the inexorable dark flowing waters of Gergiev's Rhine in the prelude through to the hair raising climax, the conductor adopts a style that reminds one time and time again of Rudolf Kempe.
Measured, controlled -and breathtakingly beautiful. Grand moments are just that-the descent to Nibelhiem (great anvils!), Donner's summoning of the winds, the Rainbow Bridge with all 6 harps clearly audible and the introduction of the sword motif as Wotan greets the castle-ALL are spectacular.
Other reviewers have commentated on a lack of excitement, and certainly if compared to Solti's "a climax every 2 minutes" approach (which I love!) that is an accurate observation. What it does have is an overwhelming sense of the architecture of the work, an inexorable slow descent into the tragic events which will ultimately lead to the destruction of the Gods, a hollow grandeur permeated with bitter irony and in that sense it evokes memories of not just Kempe but of Knappertsbusch.
Audience presence is all but undetectable, and some of the dramatic effects are either a bit tame (Donner's hammer blow) or absent (the screams of terror of the scattering Nibelungs)-but they are not in the score and are no more than common stage and recording practice so perhaps we should not complain.
This is in a different league from the recent mediocre Janowski recording, and is a different take on the work from the likes of Solti, Bohm, Karajan and Simone Young, all of which are superb.
The new Thielemann Vienna recording tops this one for me, but is not available as a "stand alone" option, but this Gergiev Rheingold joins the ranks of the very best and I have enjoyed and will to continue to enjoy returning to it. Highly recommended with 5 Stars. Stewart Crowe.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars One of the Great Rheingold's on Record! 8 Nov 2013
By gellio - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD
Wow! I was completely blown away by the singing, conducting and orchestral playing on this set. It is simply magnificent. This has to be the best sung Rheingold since Solti's. Everyone is in great form here. There is nothing to complain about. I am particularly in love with Pape's Wotan and Bulycheva's Edra - she is only on stage for a few minutes, but she is really something - my favorite Erda on record (I have 10 1/2 Ring Cycles - this and Gergiev's Walkure making up the 1/2) an this will become one of my favorites if Siegfried and Gotterdammerung are as good as Rheingold and Walkure. The only slight complaint I have is the lack of special affects (no Nibelung screams), but that is a small price to pay for these amazing performances captured in amazing sound quality. Bravo!
4.0 out of 5 stars Better than Gergiev's Walkure 18 April 2014
By William Kasimer - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD
I actively disliked most aspects of the Walkure that was issued a year or so ago. This Rheingold is certainly an improvement in most respects - the sound is better (although the orchestral sound still lacks immediacy), and Gergiev managed to stay alert for most of the opera.

The cast is good, but hardly superlative. Pape and Rügamer are the best of the singers, in part because they're the only ones whose German sounds wholly idiomatic (for the rest, their diction is fine, but their German accents are decidedly Slavic). Although Pape sounds a little tired at times, he is probably the best young Wotan on records, at least in the stereo era; Rügamer is characterful without resorting to caricature. The rest of the cast is adequate to good, without being particularly outstanding, Putilin is a rough-voiced Alberich, but very effective. I found the both giants disappointingly small-voiced and baritonal.

Is this the best Rheingold in modern sound? It may be - unlike most other recordings of the opera, there's no singer or feature that is truly objectionable. I really can't say that about the other modern recordings; I actively dislike most aspects of the Solti recording (except for the sonics, which remain unsurpassed). I still favor the Karajan recording, despite the presence of Fischer-Dieskau and Stolze - I love Karajan's approach to the opera, and the rest of the cast is close to perfection (especially those Rhinemaidens and giants!).

Here's hoping that Gergiev finds someone who can manage to sing the role of Siegfried.
5.0 out of 5 stars GREAT, the best Wagner recording I've recently heard 24 Mar 2014
By Leo Marillier - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD|Verified Purchase
Basically what I just said. The sound quality has a lot of proximity with the listener, it's very immersive - not a speck of noise besides the music. The pacing Gergiev has is even better than his already genius Parsifal. But the singers add a whole dimension to Das Rheingold, it's as expressive as story-telling. Many vocal effects, and the orchestral playing is beyond gorgeous - comparable in terms of delicacy to Solti's mighty recording with the Wiener. I actually find Gergiev better, because of the audio quality, but also because the intonation is PERFECT - the horn-chorale in the prelude is flawless. Get this recording now. I cannot rate this recording high enough
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