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Wagner: Die Meistersinger Von Nürnberg
 
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Wagner: Die Meistersinger Von Nürnberg

11 Oct. 2010 | Format: MP3

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Song Title
Time
Popularity  
30
1
9:26
30
2
3:24
30
3
4:38
30
4
4:06
30
5
2:09
30
6
2:53
30
7
5:57
30
8
1:39
30
9
3:19
30
10
4:04
30
11
3:04
30
12
6:40
30
13
5:20
30
14
2:34
30
15
5:06
30
16
5:54
Disc 2
30
1
3:26
30
2
2:25
30
3
7:41
30
4
4:00
30
5
5:27
30
6
0:49
30
7
5:27
30
8
8:34
30
9
1:44
30
10
4:07
30
11
1:43
30
12
1:37
30
13
0:57
30
14
5:19
30
15
7:45
30
16
5:21
30
17
5:44
Disc 3
30
1
6:35
30
2
4:10
30
3
3:23
30
4
6:29
30
5
4:49
30
6
4:52
30
7
10:48
30
8
7:20
30
9
7:39
30
10
5:57
30
11
5:55
30
12
2:41
Disc 4
30
1
7:56
30
2
4:17
30
3
5:46
30
4
3:22
30
5
5:13
30
6
6:30
30
7
4:41
30
8
8:03
30
9
6:29
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Product details

  • Original Release Date: 11 Oct. 2010
  • Release Date: 11 Oct. 2010
  • Number of Discs: 4
  • Label: Warner Classics
  • Copyright: (C) 2010 EMI Records Ltd.
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 4:25:14
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B0044KK3S6
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (6 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 17,803 in Albums (See Top 100 in Albums)

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

22 of 22 people found the following review helpful By D. S. CROWE TOP 500 REVIEWER on 1 Nov. 2011
Format: Audio CD
The genesis of this recording is quite interesting. Karajan had ended his association with EMI by the early 1960s, recording in Berlin with DGG and Vienna with Decca (and Decca for RCA)/ Part of the reason was that he calculated that he could "rule the roost" at DGG, and could record basically what and when he wanted to. This did not go quite according to plan, and lack of support for his Ring project and the recording of another Ring (Bohm-it was recorded by DGG) and a proposed Beethoven cycle by Bohm were not to his liking. He saw an opportunity to expand his own options, and EMI's attempts to lure him back to the fold in the late 60s were successful. It is ironic then that what is one of the most-arguably THE most- rewarding result of this resumed collaboration was this Meistersinger never intended for him in the first place.
Following Barbirolli's enormously successful return to Opera with his justly acclaimed Butterfly, and slightly less successful Otello, this project was due to be the crowning glory of Glorious John's autumnal opera revival.
Regrettably, Barbirolli died tagically before this could be realised, but VEB Schallplatten, EMI's East German partners were keen to proceed anyway.
Only then did Karajan "come into the frame", as it were, and he vacillated about the project virtually up to the last moment, politics both musical and national being major issues-in the end EMI were prepared to proceed with Jochum, but Karajan decided positively-with glorious results.
This issue is the same remastering as for the Great Classics series, and only the packaging is different.
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By J. Waite on 13 Oct. 2012
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
Not having listened to Meistersinger for some years I had forgotten what a great work it is. The last act in particular, making the final cd in this set over an hour of concentrated musical excellence, unfolding apparently endless dramatic and lyric mastery and compositional imagination. What extraordinary cultural achievements this, Tristan and the Ring are.

And this is a wonderful recording, too. Climaxes controlled with impeccable timing and really fine chorus work complement the sort of performances you would expect from this cast of major 20th century artists. I liked Geraint Evans very much too, despite criticism of his performance in this I've read elsewhere.

No doubt there are other recordings equally fine, but I could hope for none better. Beyond criticism, in my opinion. Highly recommended and currently at a very attractive price.
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By Ralph Moore TOP 50 REVIEWER on 11 Jun. 2015
Format: Audio CD
I do not mean to sound blasé or spoiled when I say that, as a very experienced listener to opera recordings, I was fairly sure that I knew what this recording would sound like before, at the urging of a fellow reviewer-friend, I finally got around to purchasing and listening to this celebrated recording, now 43 years old but still sounding remarkably good. Virtually nothing has confounded my expectations, as I knew what to expect from having read the opinions of a good few, trusted, fellow reviewers.

First of all, the sound holds up remarkably well: spacious, well balanced, rich, clear and full, without distortion - a model of analogue recording at its best, as are the playing of the Staatskapelle and the conducting of Karajan, who brings his customary ear for detail, sonority and sense of sweep to the proceedings; this is peerless, instrumentally.

The singing offers some of the best casting available in 1970, given that it was an inviolable rule that any recording made in East Germany Dresden in that era had to feature favourite son, bass-baritone Theo Adam, bothersome wobble and all. He cannot hope to emulate the authority and beauty of tone of such as Thomas Stewart for Kubelik but does not let the side down, being an otherwise sensitive and intelligent singer who can bring some of the gravitas of an experienced Wotan to his Sachs plus something of a twinkle. His tonal emission is not always, by any means, unsteady and the basic sound is attractive. Any Sachs who can carry the listener with him during the great peroration of the opera to German Art has conquered the part; Adam rises to the shameless nationalistic exaltation and exultation the sentiments demand and he is ably supported by a lusty Staatsoper Chorus, underpinned by terrific timpani.
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