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Wagner: Die Meistersinger Von Nürnberg
 
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Wagner: Die Meistersinger Von Nürnberg

11 Oct 2010 | Format: MP3

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Song Title
Time
Popularity  
1
9:26
2
3:24
3
4:38
4
4:06
5
2:09
6
2:53
7
5:57
8
1:39
9
3:19
10
4:04
11
3:04
12
6:40
13
5:20
14
2:34
15
5:06
16
5:54
Disc 2
1
3:26
2
2:25
3
7:41
4
4:00
5
5:27
6
0:49
7
5:27
8
8:34
9
1:44
10
4:07
11
1:43
12
1:37
13
0:57
14
5:19
15
7:45
16
5:21
17
5:44
Disc 3
1
6:35
2
4:10
3
3:23
4
6:29
5
4:49
6
4:52
7
10:48
8
7:20
9
7:39
10
5:57
11
5:55
12
2:41
Disc 4
1
7:56
2
4:17
3
5:46
4
3:22
5
5:13
6
6:30
7
4:41
8
8:03
9
6:29


Product details

  • Original Release Date: 11 Oct 2010
  • Release Date: 11 Oct 2010
  • Number of Discs: 4
  • Label: Warner Classics
  • Copyright: (C) 2010 EMI Records Ltd.
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 4:25:14
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B0044KK3S6
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 52,553 in MP3 Albums (See Top 100 in MP3 Albums)

Customer Reviews

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19 of 19 people found the following review helpful By D. S. CROWE TOP 500 REVIEWER on 1 Nov 2011
Format: Audio CD
The genesis of this recording is quite interesting. Karajan had ended his association with EMI by the early 1960s, recording in Berlin with DGG and Vienna with Decca (and Decca for RCA)/ Part of the reason was that he calculated that he could "rule the roost" at DGG, and could record basically what and when he wanted to. This did not go quite according to plan, and lack of support for his Ring project and the recording of another Ring (Bohm-it was recorded by DGG) and a proposed Beethoven cycle by Bohm were not to his liking. He saw an opportunity to expand his own options, and EMI's attempts to lure him back to the fold in the late 60s were successful. It is ironic then that what is one of the most-arguably THE most- rewarding result of this resumed collaboration was this Meistersinger never intended for him in the first place.
Following Barbirolli's enormously successful return to Opera with his justly acclaimed Butterfly, and slightly less successful Otello, this project was due to be the crowning glory of Glorious John's autumnal opera revival.
Regrettably, Barbirolli died tagically before this could be realised, but VEB Schallplatten, EMI's East German partners were keen to proceed anyway.
Only then did Karajan "come into the frame", as it were, and he vacillated about the project virtually up to the last moment, politics both musical and national being major issues-in the end EMI were prepared to proceed with Jochum, but Karajan decided positively-with glorious results.
This issue is the same remastering as for the Great Classics series, and only the packaging is different.
Read more ›
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By J. Waite on 13 Oct 2012
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
Not having listened to Meistersinger for some years I had forgotten what a great work it is. The last act in particular, making the final cd in this set over an hour of concentrated musical excellence, unfolding apparently endless dramatic and lyric mastery and compositional imagination. What extraordinary cultural achievements this, Tristan and the Ring are.

And this is a wonderful recording, too. Climaxes controlled with impeccable timing and really fine chorus work complement the sort of performances you would expect from this cast of major 20th century artists. I liked Geraint Evans very much too, despite criticism of his performance in this I've read elsewhere.

No doubt there are other recordings equally fine, but I could hope for none better. Beyond criticism, in my opinion. Highly recommended and currently at a very attractive price.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Mr Swallow on 29 April 2013
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
Whether or not you can take to some of Wagner's xenophobic rhetoric in this opera there is no doubt of its beauty. This beauty is wonderfully brought out by Karajan and the Dresden forces with their famed burnished gold tone. The recording was apparently a very happy occasion for both conductor and orchestra and it shows in the results on these discs. There is a spontaneity about this performance which wasn't always evident in Karajan's later work. The cast is really good with the young lovers sounding young, which is important. Ridderbusch is a superb Pogner, Evans a whiny Beckmesser and Screier's David is really good. As Hans Sachs Adam is fine although one could ideally do with a little more weight of tone. But this is a quibble. One of the best of all Wagner sets.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Bernard Michael O'Hanlon on 3 Jan 2014
Format: Audio CD
Like 95% of us, I'm a pretender in Wagner and abjectly so. With no melody in sight, I asphyxiate in that first hour of Siegfried: surely we have a right to be bored by such a dynamic? I'm more likely to cross the Simpson Desert in February on foot than traverse Rienzi. I've yet to make it through the Flying Dutchman. Lohengrin, its Prelude aside, bores me to this day.

Hitherto, I have resisted Meistersinger for the better part of three decades, declaring that it was a bridge too far and citing the brevity of life. How asinine I was! This Karajan recording from late 1970 has led to a `novus ordo saeclorum'.

I have contacts in the 5%. Some of them adore this recording; others do so with reservations, highlighting Theo Adam (Sith-Lord of Wobble), Evans' caricature of Beckmesser and the timbre of Kollo; whilst acknowledging its obvious strengths, a few dismiss it per se. I daresay it will arouse controversy until kingdom come.

On my part - amateur though I be - its joie de vivre is sovereign. The triumph is underwritten by the sumptuousness of the Dresden Staatskapelle and Karajan's mastery. It's Wagner at his most loveable. No wonder his buddy Nietzsche was so envious of the "Magician" - there is no greater affirmation of life (and refutation of `Afterworldsmen') than the Quintet from Act 3: Wagner says in a few bars what it takes Fred a few thousand words to grind out. Here is humanity with all its foibles and aspirations. It says: the world is enough; there is a time for everything under the sun. Catharsis ensues long before the final chorus.

I love this. As one of the five percenters (Ralph Moore) said recently, it's more than the sum of its parts. Long may it continue to divide and proselytise!
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