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Wagner: Lohengrin (3 CDs)
 
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Wagner: Lohengrin (3 CDs)

10 Jun. 1996 | Format: MP3

£15.99 (VAT included if applicable)
Buy the CD album for £12.94 and get the MP3 version for FREE. Does not apply to gift orders.
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Song Title Artist
Time
Popularity  
30
1
8:18
30
2
4:42
30
3
7:12
30
4
4:00
30
5
4:51
30
6
5:20
30
7
5:22
30
8
3:49
30
9
5:40
30
10
3:34
30
11
1:52
30
12
5:39
30
13
4:21
30
14
4:23
30
15
8:19
Disc 2
30
1
8:06
30
2
3:51
30
3
4:36
30
4
4:16
30
5
8:32
30
6
3:25
30
7
1:27
30
8
8:27
30
9
5:33
30
10
5:34
30
11
3:22
30
12
5:57
30
13
5:28
30
14
6:51
Disc 3
30
1
3:36
30
2
4:58
30
3
7:34
30
4
5:02
30
5
8:10
30
6
5:20
30
7
3:27
30
8
3:42
30
9
6:28
30
10
6:20
30
11
6:12
30
12
8:27
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Product details

  • Original Release Date: 13 May 1996
  • Release Date: 10 Jun. 1996
  • Number of Discs: 3
  • Label: Decca (UMO)
  • Copyright: (C) 1987 Deutsche Grammophon GmbH, Hamburg
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 3:42:03
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B001NB4ALK
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 212,001 in Albums (See Top 100 in Albums)

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

26 of 29 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 31 Jan. 2001
Format: Audio CD
This is a work that requires sensitive handling both to the singers and as a drama and under Kubelik it is superbly performed. As ever, a musician's conductor - he loves the score and secures matchless playing from the Bavarian orchestra. The cast for the most part is almost beyond reproach too, and indicative of the age in which it was made: the Elsa of Janowitz is angelic, and long held to be the greatest interpretation of the part on record. Karl Ridderbusch is an arrestng and authoritative King of noble tone, Thomas Stewart makes much of Telramund. This leaves perhaps the two most controvercial performers and their roles. Firstly, Gwyneth Jones' Ortrud: true, the voice was prone to some harshness, but also, at it's peak of great interpretive commitment and insight. Always the intelligent artist, Jones uses the vast resources at her disposal to great effect in conveying one of the most atmospheric Ortrud's on record. Listen to the start of Act II and the nuances in her exchanges with Elsa and Telramund - how different they are! This is not a one sided Ortrud, there are many subtle touches revealing the depth of the performance - and it is unfair to dismiss the role for a few wild vocal emissions. Secondly: James King's Lohengrin. Unfortunately in the 70s when the set was made, King was probably the only Heldentenor of any world standing that a major recording company cosider making a set with. He sings the role with full ardour, no denying that, and it does benefit from stage experience as Lohengrin too. However, he is the one performer who most disregards the copius dymanic markings of the vocal line (unlike all other Wagner tenor roles, this one is marked for the most part 'mp' or below.Read more ›
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11 of 12 people found the following review helpful By dreamchildren on 8 Dec. 2008
Format: Audio CD
This is undoubtedly one of the most sublime and eloquent performances of Lohengrin I've ever come across. Kubelik is a superb Wagner conductor who knows how to achieve maximum dramatic effect without vulgar exaggeration. The orchestra parts are beautifully crafted. Janowitz's angelic singing brings the other-worldly beauty to the whole opera.
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14 of 16 people found the following review helpful By Ralph Moore TOP 50 REVIEWER on 13 Jan. 2008
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
Having been slightly disappointed by the live 1954 Jochum and 1953 Keilberth recordings - mainly because of deficiencies in Windassen's assumption of the eponymous hero and even in some of the deeper voices - turning to this recording was balm to my ears. In the reviews I have read, no-one has much remarked on the beauty of sound; a slight reverberance, real depth, crisp detail and a proper sense of theatre without the Bayreuth hackers who blight the quieter moments in the live recordings, especially the Jochum. The next thing to emphasise is the beauty of the voices. Several performances here are definitive; Kubelik was always so sympathetic to his artists and he gives them space to make their points without dragging. One first hears Nienstedt, Ridderbusch and Stewart as the Herald, the King and Telramund respectively - and what a joy it is to hear such firm, characterful, resonant, virile voices. Stewart in particular surprised me - though I was already familiar with his lovely Sachs in Kubelik's equally recommendable "Meistersinger"; he is every bit as expressive and grateful on the ear as the great Uhde and more so than Fischer-Dieskau in his nonetheless estimable performance for Kempe. The chorus is terrific; the orchestra precise and energised, and Kubelik confirms his status as perhaps my favourite of all conductors. As for Janowitz, she is a dream. That silvery, plangent tone is ideally suited to the ethereal (slightly loopy!) Elsa. Just listen to her exchange with Ortrud in Band 5 of the second disc if you need convincing -which brings me to the most controversial piece of casting in this recording: Gwyneth Jones' Ortrud. Jones had a huge voice and the vibrato became obtrusive too early in her career, but here I think her malignancy and subtlety of characterisation carry the day.Read more ›
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By Philip Noble on 23 Feb. 2014
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
This is a very good version and benefits from the advantage of studio recordings as opposed to live stage performances - no sudden coughing. All the cast are strong and King and Janowitz do well in their leading roles.
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15 of 22 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 13 April 2000
Format: Audio CD
there are many things in this recording that come close to perfection and a few that unfortunately marr the overall impression. LOHENGRIN is one of wagner's most staged and most recorded works and deservedly so - it has so many lyrical and serene passages that make it the most accessible work in wagner's oeuvre. there are many good recordings around and this one is one of the most satisfying. rafael kubelik is a strong yet subtle conductor, who shapes the swelling rhythms very well (listen to the introduction of elsa's first appearance or the prelude to the first act, which seems to come right from heaven), without ever induldging in mannered tempo changes, which marr karajan's recording for emi severely. furthermore kubelik is a "singer's conductor", hence he and his orchestra (the fantastic bavarian radio symphony orchestra who respond with utmost accuracy without ever losing spontaneity) support the singers rather than drowning them with their sound. overall - one rather severe exception apart - the singers are a distinguished lot. gundula janowitz as elsa sings like an angel, in the beginning suitably withdrawn from reality. only later (especially in the last act) one could wish for more commitment, for more ardour and wordpointing (as for instance anja silja in bayreuth under sawallisch or elisabeth gruemmer in the studio under kempe do), but the voice itself has such a silvery sheen and never produces an ugly tone that this small criticism is far outweighed by the pleasure her voice gives.Read more ›
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