What You Don't Know About Religion (but Should) and over 2 million other books are available for Amazon Kindle . Learn more
£15.84
  • RRP: £15.94
  • You Save: £0.10 (1%)
FREE Delivery in the UK.
Usually dispatched within 1 to 3 weeks.
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon.
Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

WHAT YOU DON'T KNOW ABOUT RELI Hardcover – 1 Jun 2013


See all 3 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
£15.84
£9.18 £12.31


Product details

  • Hardcover: 1 pages
  • Publisher: INDEPENDENT PUBLISHERS GROUP (1 Jun 2013)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0985281537
  • ISBN-13: 978-0985281533
  • Product Dimensions: 15.2 x 2.5 x 22.9 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 360,357 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Authors

Discover books, learn about writers, and more.

Inside This Book (Learn More)
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt
Search inside this book:

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5 stars
5 star
2
4 star
1
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 3 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
A fascinating exploration of a range of topics, all complete with a range of citations that you can look up should you so wish... what more could the avid Skeptic want?
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
An excellent review of sociological research on the characteristics of groups ranging from extremist religion to non-religious. Should be read by anyone interested in the subject, or who ought to be. I'd like to have every politician read it. The evidence shows conclusively that moderate or no religion is superior to more extreme views.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
By I. Darren TOP 1000 REVIEWER on 25 July 2013
Format: Kindle Edition
If you want to polarise a group of people and put the metaphorical cat amongst the pigeons, you need a book like this, which concerns itself with religion!

The core, seemingly basic questions, such as what is religion, are religious people more moral, more humble or happier or even is religion good for your health, are posed by the author. The latter question, or more specifically the lack of religion, can be very injurious to one's health in some countries. The questions can be very contentious wherever you ask them!

This reviewer is not religious and is probably an atheist, yet the subject of religion is interesting and he enjoys talking to various religious groups. One can respect something that one doesn't (yet?) believe in. So reading this book and the author's viewpoints was a treat. Even the chapter headings manage to draw you in and make you want to read on if nothing else to discover what it is all about. Where else might you read titles such as "All Babies Are Atheists: Why Belief in a Specific God Is Not Innate", "The Religious Clone Wars: How Most People Become Religious", "There Are No Atheists in... Prison Cells?" and "Who's Better at Dying?: Religion and Coping".

Make no mistake, despite this being written by a professor, this is neither a dry or overtly-academic work. Opinion, humour and the odd bit of provocation is present and quite rightly so. The author looks at religion from a slightly sceptical, one time "indoctrinated" perspective with a sociological slant. Expecting criticism the author notes that many religious people might object to this book and its approach, suggesting that to learn about a (specific) religion one should ask an adherent. Yet in the author's experience adherents often don't fully know about their (chosen) religion.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 16 reviews
18 of 18 people found the following review helpful
Enlightening, Entertaining - Well Done. 17 Jun 2013
By Grant - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I really enjoyed this book. I'm not a sociologist - far from it, but learned a lot from the book. The book compares a lot of data of how religious fundamentalists, religious moderates, religious liberals, and the nonreligious view the world, particularly on progressive issues - gender equality, racial equality, marriage equality, and so forth. Dr. Cragun goes into detail and shares humorous anecdotes to identify many of the fallacies that are common within religious fundamentalism. Having been raised as a fundamentalist mormon, but now a "liberal / nonliteral mormon" on my journey (if that can exist) I identify with the author's point of view in terms of how harmful (or at least unhelpful) a fundamentalist view of the world can be. I agree with the author's conclusions that as the world moves towards being more liberal in a religious sense, or moves to being nonreligious, that barriers will come down and we will embrace our common humanity and current challenges, rather than focus on our differences.
12 of 12 people found the following review helpful
The world is no longer black and white 18 Jun 2013
By systemm17 - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I really enjoyed What You Don't Know About Religion (but should) by Cragun. Having recently left my religious upbringing, I found the data and science in this book extremely interesting. I originally thought I left my religion for doctrinal issues (I did by the way), but realized I may have also left simply because science suggests some people leave religion (typically the more educated, more financially stable, logical thinking, more accepting of others, more likely to view the world as gray rather than black and white, willing to question ideas and concepts, etc). I don't necessarily believe that I am more of those things than someone else, but my arrogance while in religion led me to believe I was better than someone who was not in my religion (see chapter 15). Cragun certainly admits his bias in writing this book (trying to rid the world of religious fundamentalists), but leaves the door open for the idea that not all religion is bad (liberal religious typically score equal or sometimes higher than non-religious). A lot of Cragun's examples have to do with his Mormon upbringing, but this is not an attack on Mormonism. Rather this is an attack on all fundamental religions, it just so happens that Cragun was born Mormon (see chapter 4). It's a great book for all religious and non-religious to read. For the religious, try to be more liberal and to the non-religious, it's a fascinating study on the benefits of your decision.
10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
A Challenging, Insightful, Funny Book! 19 Jun 2013
By Michael Eaton - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
First of all: Read this book!

Basically, "What You Don't Know About Religion (but should)" is about the affects of various groups of Christian religion and the non-religious on society. It does not address such topics as the nature or existence of God, the Trinity, or the proper form of baptism. It is strictly a book about one topic in sociology written by a professor of sociology.

However, that prior description is very superficial and misleading. Do not expect a colorless tome which presents dry facts and figures and draws unemotional conclusions from them. Instead, expect a very wild and personal ride through religion and non-religion by a young man with a very definite point of view. This book is bound to cause debate and argument among many of its readers.

Professor Ryan Cragun is a professor of sociology at the University of Florida whose research focuses on Mormonism and the nonreligious. His wife, Debi, has been a visiting professor of genetics at the same institution and is currently in the PhD program for public health at the University of South Florida. Ryan Cragun was born and raised in Morgan, Utah and served a Mormon (LDS) mission for two years in Costa Rica. He and Debi were married in a Mormon temple wedding in 1999. In 2002, both left the Mormon faith and are now atheists.

I should note here that I share some similarities of history with Dr. Cragun . I, too, served a two year mission for "the Church" and many years later left it to become a human secularist/agnostic/atheist. I also agree with all the opinions and conclusions which he expresses about religion and non-religion in the book.

Dr. Cragun tells several personal stories about his life in the Mormon Church and his experiences in Costa Rica. He talks frankly about the emotional costs that he and his wife had to pay for leaving the Church. He also tells stories of others who have been negatively affected by their various experiences in their fundamentalist denominations. Some of these stories are so horrible that you have trouble believing that they could happen in this enlightened age.

Due in part to the limitations of the various sources of his data, he has chosen to divide the many Christian denominations into three basic types: Fundamentalists, Moderates, and Liberal. These are followed by the Nonreligious. He presents facts and conclusions which will undoubtedly anger or (hopefully) intrigue or enlighten many readers. Liberal Christians followed by the Nonreligious come out best in his analyses. At the very bottom are the Fundamentalists, who come off as the Luddites of this age. Dr. Cragun (and I) have very little use for them, seeing that belief system as a strong negative influence in the world.

Despite being an atheist himself, some of Cragun's conclusions and opinions about certain groups in atheism are bound to anger (piss off) those groups. He believes that these groups (the New Atheists) come across as just as fundamentalist and absolutest as Christian Fundamentalists. That they unjustly and unrealistically paint all the various Christian groups with the same monochromatic brush and thus drive away some believers who could easily be allies.

In conclusion, this is a funny, insightful, hard-headed look at religion and non-religion. No matter your beliefs or non-beliefs, you will learn something -- several things -- that will challenge you with new and clearer perspectives. Unless you are a Fundamentalist...
8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
Has you thinking... 25 July 2013
By I. Darren - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
If you want to polarise a group of people and put the metaphorical cat amongst the pigeons, you need a book like this, which concerns itself with religion!

The core, seemingly basic questions, such as what is religion, are religious people more moral, more humble or happier or even is religion good for your health, are posed by the author. The latter question, or more specifically the lack of religion, can be very injurious to one's health in some countries. The questions can be very contentious wherever you ask them!

This reviewer is not religious and is probably an atheist, yet the subject of religion is interesting and he enjoys talking to various religious groups. One can respect something that one doesn't (yet?) believe in. So reading this book and the author's viewpoints was a treat. Even the chapter headings manage to draw you in and make you want to read on if nothing else to discover what it is all about. Where else might you read titles such as "All Babies Are Atheists: Why Belief in a Specific God Is Not Innate", "The Religious Clone Wars: How Most People Become Religious", "There Are No Atheists in... Prison Cells?" and "Who's Better at Dying?: Religion and Coping".

Make no mistake, despite this being written by a professor, this is neither a dry or overtly-academic work. Opinion, humour and the odd bit of provocation is present and quite rightly so. The author looks at religion from a slightly sceptical, one time "indoctrinated" perspective with a sociological slant. Expecting criticism the author notes that many religious people might object to this book and its approach, suggesting that to learn about a (specific) religion one should ask an adherent. Yet in the author's experience adherents often don't fully know about their (chosen) religion. Sure, they might understand the teachings and principles that they are taught, but apparently this could be a false flag as scientific research notes that atheists may know more about religion in the United States than do religious people.

Strap yourself in as you may be in for a lively, bumpy read, irrespective of your religious thoughts and beliefs. There is something for everyone and it might either reinforce your views OR change them... Yet this is not one of those "does God exist?" books, or something that seeks to promote one religion over another. It is more a look at the social science of religion (the actual version of religion is less important in this context).

This review will not seek to justify, validate or dismiss the claims within this book. That is for the reader's own mind to process, perhaps building on existing views and preconceptions, influenced by any openness of thought and thinking. If you hold religious convictions and have a mind closed to any other opinion or consideration then it is unfortunate that this book is not for you. That is a shame, as one could imagine how in certain circumstances this book could reinforce or refine your religious convictions. And on the other hand it could blow it out of the water. It is not a book to encourage a non-religious lifestyle but it does encourage thought. Thought shouldn't be dangerous. If there is a God, many religious texts say that God will guide the adherent through life and show the way forward. So why should you have something to fear from this book and its message...?

As this is a book that will have you thinking, the chapters are thankfully quite short (but plentiful). Ideal "bite-size" portions that allow you to digest your meal of thoughts and reflect. So all in all, a very good read that can be different things to different readers.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
The Statistical Facts...are IMPORTANT! 13 Jan 2014
By J. Maurice - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
We, at the Orlando Humanists Association had the pleasure of hearing Professor Cragun speak at our monthly meeting yesterday. Here are some of the topical questions he answered in his discussion and what is also included in his book.

* What is a religion?

* Why are people religious?

* Are religious people more educated than nonreligious people?

* Are religious people more moral, more humble, or happier?

* Are religious people more or less prejudiced than nonreligious people?

* Is religion good for your health? Are people becoming more or less religious?

In conclusion, if you want to know the statistical facts concerning the above questions etc. buy this book. ENJOY!
Were these reviews helpful? Let us know


Feedback