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Voyage To The End Of The Room Paperback – 5 Aug 2004


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Product details

  • Paperback: 256 pages
  • Publisher: Vintage; New Ed edition (5 Aug 2004)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0099437732
  • ISBN-13: 978-0099437734
  • Product Dimensions: 12.9 x 1.6 x 19.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (17 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 784,523 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Review

'Barking mad, but brilliant' -- FHM

'Dazzlingly articulate-funny, insightful, thought-provoking-wickedly entertaining' -- Sunday Times

Book Description

'Dazzlingly articulate... Funny, insightful, thought-provoking...wickedly entertaining' Sunday Times

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Customer Reviews

3.1 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By L. Black on 12 Jun 2006
Format: Paperback
First things first: not much actually happens in Voyage to the End of the Room. In fact the title suggests just that. It is, succinctly, a great novel for writers who aren't afraid to read something a little different. Once again this novel showcases Fischer's deft hand at writing witty, catching prose which is so ultimately his domain. No one else could possibly have been successful in a novel like this, and none could possibly have made it work either.

However Fischer does seem to get rather bogged down in the flashback to Oceane's experiences working in a sex-club in Barcelona for whatever reasons. I was rather more eager to get onto her tracking Dudley's globtrotting search to uncover whether her ex is actually alive, and if not, why she's receiving letters, the original reason I bought the novel. But then, this is a Tibor Fischer novel, and the whole novel works, but only because of Fischer's ability with his use of language.

Voyage to the End of the Room, like it's protagonist, is odd, but entirely charming. If you hadn't fallen in love with Fischer before, this might just ease you into his style. It's light entertainment which proves to be a little thought-provoking, if only he had stayed a little bit more interested on finding Ocean's ex, rather than her past.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By h.j. on 11 Jun 2006
Format: Paperback
I thought this was the type of book you pick up only because you needed another one to complete a "3 for 2" deal. It looked innocent enough, and I expected that it would require minimal effort, but forty pages in I began struggling to keep believing it was a mindless read. Fischer's style forces you to either think about what he's saying or make an attempt to ignore it. I found that it's best to stop and think for a bit. The numerous page breaks offer chances for injections of thought into the work, both by the main character Oceane and by the reader. Although I enjoyed most of these moments of reflection, I also found that they could interrupt the story too much. The slowness can become a little dull when Oceane thinks about nothing for three-pages, the plot already lost in the hundred-page tangent in Barcelona. At that point all I wanted to do was get back into the story. Unfortunately much of the novel has nothing to do with the plot.

The humour created by the combination of non sequiturs and red herrings keeps the prose lively.

There basically is no plot, but as I read further into the book I found that just about everything is like the front cover: a cow about to land in a swimming pool while someone is peacefully lying in the sun. While the author shows a great deal of wit in his focus on the unpleasantness of life and other people, he also takes a more serious approach in making the reader stop to think about the ideas involved in the work. Parts of the novel show an undeniably more hopeful side, turning the main points away from a simple bashing of modern life.

I think the main thing lacking in this novel is the plot, but with his amusing style Fischer kept me interesting to the end.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By bert nairobi on 19 Dec 2003
Format: Paperback
Voyage To The End Of The Room succeeds as a result of Tibor Fischer's incredibly creative use of language. On most pages there will be a phrase or sentence which has enough originality to suggest it couldn't have been written by anyone else. The use of language suggests a real playfulness and wit, an approach to words from some of their less frequented etymologies and shades of meaning. And this is done without the inventiveness being irritating. It suits the narrator and offered a griphandle on her identity and character.
The lack of much by way of a plot is completely unimportant. Rather than the novel being as incoherent or unstructured as that suggests, "Voyage" does have a story to tell and its told through a mosaic of individual histories set in a few particular places. Those are London, the Spanish sex club (which could have been anywhere), Yugoslavia and Chuuk. For a novel whose central character is an agoraphobic ex-dancer the novel's broad footprint is impressive and is another of the book's many jokes.
There is a conservative, misanthropic undercurrent to this novel but somehow despite this it does have a human message (if you like this kind of thing).
Finally, yes, congratulations to the art director for a very eye-hooking front cover. Too often this kind of pretty photography is cheesy bait on a mousetrap novel. In this instance the choice of photo was a good lure into a cleverly written take on the straggling mess of a certain approach to living.
This book probably won't change your life but it is miles better than four evenings watching television.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 14 Dec 2003
Format: Paperback
"Voyage to the end of the Room" was, as others have noted below, largely a collection of invented anecdotes that have no cohesion or unifying theme. More importantly, they are not amusing, interesting or plausible anecdotes. It takes more than this to make a novel.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 2 Dec 2003
Format: Paperback
Occasionally entertaining, but really too aimless and frivolous to amount to much more than a series of disconnected - and generally too ridiculous - anecdotes. As you read, you wonder where it is all going; and the answer is ultimately nowhere. This book has an air of having been tossed off (that term used advisedly) to meet a contractual commitment. Fischer should really grasp the concept that to be genuinely funny, humour must be close to the truth. Creating ridiculous stories is easy; making them believable and unifying them into a coherent story is hard, and that is why great writers get paid the big (okay, the small) bucks.
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