Voices from the Workhouse and over 2 million other books are available for Amazon Kindle . Learn more
FREE Delivery in the UK.
In stock.
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon.
Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
Voices from the Workhouse has been added to your Basket
+ £2.80 UK delivery
Used: Good | Details
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Ships from the UK. Former Library book. Shows some signs of wear, and may have some markings on the inside. 100% Money Back Guarantee. Your purchase also supports literacy charities.
Trade in your item
Get a £0.34
Gift Card.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Voices from the Workhouse Paperback – 1 Oct 2012


See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
£12.99
£11.42 £9.98
£12.99 FREE Delivery in the UK. In stock. Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.

Special Offers and Product Promotions

  • When you trade in £15 or more you’ll receive an additional £5 Amazon.co.uk Gift Card for the next time you spend £10 or more.

Frequently Bought Together

Voices from the Workhouse + A Grim Almanac of the Workhouse (Grim Almanacs) + Life in a Victorian Workhouse
Price For All Three: £31.98

Buy the selected items together


Trade In this Item for up to £0.34
Trade in Voices from the Workhouse for an Amazon Gift Card of up to £0.34, which you can then spend on millions of items across the site. Trade-in values may vary (terms apply). Learn more

Product details

  • Paperback: 224 pages
  • Publisher: The History Press (1 Oct. 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0752467492
  • ISBN-13: 978-0752467498
  • Product Dimensions: 23.1 x 15.5 x 1.3 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (18 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 254,963 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Peter Higginbotham became fascinated by the workhouse when, while tracing his family history, he discovered that one of his forebears had died in such an institution. His extensive researches resulted in an acclaimed web site (workhouses.org.uk) and many books including the much-praised 'Workhouse Encyclopedia', 'Voices from the Workhouse', and 'A Grim Almanac of the Workhouse'.

His favourite volume, 'The Workhouse Cookbook', is actually more of a history of the workhouse rather a recipe book but it clearly confused bookshops who mostly filed under "cookery" rather than "history"! It was followed by his entertaining history of the English prison system, 'The Prison Cookbook'.

Peter, who lives in West Yorkshire, regularly contributes to magazines, radio and TV programmes such as "Who Do You Think You Are?" He also frequently presents talks on the workhouse and related topics to groups around the region.

His latest project is a history of children's homes - www.childrenshomes.org.uk

Product Description

About the Author

Peter Higginbotham is a freelance writer and historian. His fascination with the subject of workhouses began after discovering an ancestor had died in the Birmingham workhouse. His interests encompass other historical institutions such as prisons, asylums, hospitals, children's homes and housing for the poor. He is the author of several books and also regularly contributes to magazines and TV and radio programmes, including Radio 4's Making History and BBC1's Heir Hunters.

Inside This Book (Learn More)
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index | Back Cover
Search inside this book:

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5 stars
5 star
13
4 star
5
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 18 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By susan wallace on 8 Mar. 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
If we had to live as these people did in this day and age then I do not think that many of use would survive, we learn how hard people lives where and how much of a disgrace some people found going into the workhouse was , eventhough they had no choice if they wanted to survive. The treatment of children and young babies give you food for thought as well as the rule that had tobe abided by I think that every young person should read this to see how much life has chnge for the better.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Fil77 on 4 Jan. 2014
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I bought this as I have a particular interest in this area of history and first person accounts of workhouses are naturally not all that common, especially not all in one place. It is basically a collection of short, first hand accounts arranged into logical chapters by one of the most popular workhouse historians at the moment. The book covers inmates, staff, and social enquirers among others and features the likes of Charlie Chaplain and Henry Morton Stanley. A lot of the accounts are obviously sad and tragic but a lot are surprisingly positive, the short stories make the book suitable for 'dipping in and out of' or for reading in a couple of sittings. I would recommend this for people who have a general interest, have workhouse ancestry or for poor law students - bearing in mind that a lot of the sources and accounts are biased.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Manxtoby on 10 Feb. 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Interesting collection of memories of both inmates and staff of workhouses, a real insight into the culture of the times
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Mr.Greenbean on 16 Jan. 2014
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
A very good read. Lot's of information on life in the workhouse ,told by evidence given by inmates ,Governors and under cover reporters of the time . I was drawn to this book and found it hard to put down . Recommend this to any one who has any interest in the Workhouse , the food and accommodation and the characters that visited these institutions .
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Quiltslm on 30 July 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
A valuable and interesting book. Very useful for research as well as of historical value.
Well researched and written book
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By cas on 4 Sept. 2014
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This is a fascinating read. Contrary to popular belief not all workhouses or industrial schools were dreadful. Strict most of them were but then that was the way then and circumstances dictated methods quite often. Not to say there weren't some bad workhouses there definitely were but human as we are, these ill treatments still go on! - One is almost tempted to say we could do with some of them coming back. Its interesting too that not everyone in a workhouse was poor, though most were. Some houses were very well kept. The inmates kept them that way. Everyone had a job to do to maintain the place which also meant they were occupied. Some people on going back out into the world actually chose to return as you didnt have to work so hard in a workhouse and had your food cooked for you and served up. Yes, some found life easier in a workhouse than outside! This book is quite a revelation!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By fulabull on 13 Jan. 2014
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Worthwhile book to have when researching family members who might have been unfortunate enough to require "parish support"! An historical account of past life.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Crazybint on 25 May 2014
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
A much broader approach to the history of the work house than I have come across before, many original sources from users, managers and those presenting themselves as users. It is a book that also brings to mind many of the issues we are now hearing from politicians about the deserving and undeserving poor. Fabulous read.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again


Feedback