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The Voice of the Violin (Inspector Montalbano Mysteries) Paperback – 6 Jan 2006


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Product details

  • Paperback: 272 pages
  • Publisher: Picador; New Ed edition (6 Jan 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0330492993
  • ISBN-13: 978-0330492997
  • Product Dimensions: 13 x 1.7 x 19.7 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (74 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 17,296 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Andrea Camilleri is one of Italy's most famous contemporary writers. His Montalbano series has been adapted for Italian television and translated into nine languages. He lives in Rome. Stephen Sartarelli is an award-winning translator. He is also the author of three books of poetry, most recently The Open Vault. He lives in France.

Product Description

Review

Wit and laugh-aloud humour, the delicious atmosphere of Sicily, the occasional recipes..and the character of Montalbano himself...a joy to read -- Marcel Berlins, The Times --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

About the Author

Andrea Camilleri is one of Italy's most famous contemporary writers. The Montalbano series has been translated into nine languages and the novels have been bestsellers both in Italy and Germany. The author lives in Rome.

Stephen Sartarelli is a poet and translator. He lives in France.


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Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

11 of 11 people found the following review helpful By superscribe on 4 Jan 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I have now read the first four books in the Inspector Montalbano series and, like the first three, 'The Voice of the Violin' was music to my ears. The hero is a very likeable character although he does have a mean streak when he's in a grumpy mood or someone upsets him, which happens regularly. His appetite for food is remarkable (coral sauce made of langoustine roe and sea-urchin pulp! Baby Squid!)and he seems to spend most of the book eating, preparing to eat, or recovering after eating. The other characters are well presented and the plot flows along pretty well. I have been a bit critical giving four stars but the minor sub plot regarding Montalbano, his absentee girlfriend, and the young boy they planned to adopt, is a bit confusing if you haven't read 'The Snack Thief'. And the Inspector's flash of inspiration towards the end of the book (the voice of the violin) seemed a bit thin. Perhaps it's just me. I like the way the traslator, Stephen Sartarelli, includes some explanatory notes at the end of the book. I often wish the authors of Hollywood detective stories would do the same. If you aren't a vegetarian, and don't mind the occasional rude word, you will enjoy this novel.
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28 of 29 people found the following review helpful By Linda Oskam on 13 Sep 2006
Format: Paperback
When the police car of Inspector Montalbano hits a small car parked at an apparently deserted country home, the inspector has a gut feeling that something is wrong. He finds the body of a beautiful woman, strangled in her bedroom. After a short while it turns out that the woman has numerous acquaintances in the area and that there are a fair number of suspects. The investigation is not made any easier by the fact that Montalbano's superiors are not exactly supporting him, even though his own team is squarely behind him. A combination of good policework and flashes of brilliance in the end solves the crime. In the meantime Montalbano also has to sort out the mess that he is making of his private life. And that is the nice thing about this series: it is the combination of police work and private hassles, that make Montalbano into more than your average, typical policeman-from-a-novel, but rather a real character with his good and his bad sides.
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44 of 46 people found the following review helpful By "coaching-creativity" on 8 Sep 2005
Format: Hardcover
For me this is a great new find.
Translated from italian, it looses nothing of the humour and richness of Montalbano and his life in Sicily. I have laughed out loud and been captivated by the setting.
A wonderful read.
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22 of 23 people found the following review helpful By J. Stack on 28 Oct 2004
Format: Hardcover
This is the 4th. installment in the Montalbano series.
Definitely start with, the Shape of Water, then the Teracotta Dog, followed by The Snack Thief..
The protagonist is a food buff, and the meals will make your mouth water...!
An excellent series, well plotted crimes with wit and pace...
Excellent translation as well...
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11 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Donald Mitchell HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 20 Jun 2004
Format: Hardcover
If you decide that you want to read this book, be sure to read The Snack Thief first. Many of the references in the book don't make a lot of sense without that background. Otherwise, you will think this is a two or a three star book. Please don't read further until you have read The Snack Thief.
The Voice of the Violin is deftly written. It captures all of the confusing elements of a disjointed case in which the clues are deeply hidden. I didn't tumble to the full scale of the mystery until quite near the end, when Mr. Camilleri chose to make it transparent. Here's a sample of the writing from the opening paragraph: "Inspector Salvo Montalbano could immediately tell that it was not going to be his day." " . . . [T]he darkness was already lifting . . . to reveal . . . a sea that looked like a Pekingese dog." "Ever since a tiny dog of that breed . . . had bitten painfully into his calf . . . Montalbano saw the sea this way whenever it was whipped up." "His mood darkened . . . . He had to attend a funeral."
The story opens with Montalbano's futile efforts to attend that funeral in Floridia, after receiving a mangled telephone message from the ever annoying Catarella. In a day that resembles a frustration dream, Montalbano misses the funeral. The only effect of his journey is to have Gallo's efforts to evade a chicken cause the police car to clip a passenger car. Leaving a note on the car's windshield, Montalbano becomes curious when no one calls the station about making repairs. He visits the house where the car is parked and finds no one at home. As this recurs, he decides to let himself in at night with his picklocks. He finds a sight that sickens him; a beautiful nude woman has been murdered in her bed.
From there, the story takes on a Keystone Kops-like character.
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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful By hillbank68 TOP 500 REVIEWER on 20 April 2007
Format: Paperback
This is my favourite of the Inspector Montalbano books (all of which I like) so far - as much as anything because I can actually follow the plot without too much head-scratching. For a series of detective stories to succeed, there must be various ingredients - an interesting and quirky detective who meets, perhaps, misunderstanding and opposition from lesser lights in his profession (in this case an obnoxious new Commissioner) a plot with some freshness, originality and surprises in it (why is this called 'The Voice of the Violin'? We find out 5/6 of the way through, and it's fully appropriate) a vivid, characterful setting, perhaps some humour, and a fluid pace to the narrative. Camilleri achieves all of these things in his books, and this one is no exception, and to it all he adds Italian food - Montalbano is quite capable of halting his investigation for a couple of hours if he nears a restaurant whose chef knows what he's doing. I don't think this is quite five-star stuff, but no-one could regret reading it ; it gives a lot of pleasure.
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