Quantity:1
Vivaldi : Le quattro stag... has been added to your Basket
+ £1.26 UK delivery
Used: Like New | Details
Sold by prjhk
Condition: Used: Like New
Comment: BUY WITH CONFIDENCE FULL QUALITY CONTROL - Posted next day
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon

Image Unavailable

Image not available for
Colour:
  • Vivaldi : Le quattro stagioni [The Four Seasons] & Concertos
  • Sorry, this item is not available in
  • Image not available
      

Vivaldi : Le quattro stagioni [The Four Seasons] & Concertos


Price: £6.30 & FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £20. Details
Only 1 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
30 new from £3.78 3 used from £5.00
£6.30 & FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £20. Details Only 1 left in stock (more on the way). Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.

Special Offers and Product Promotions

  • Buy a CD from our World, Folk, Classical or Jazz stores to purchase Songlines Music Awards 2015 CD for £3.99. Here's how (terms and conditions apply)

Product details

  • Audio CD (15 April 2013)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Label: CLASSICAL
  • ASIN: B00BNWX04M
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 188,443 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

1. Le quattro stagioni (The Four Seasons), Violin Concerto in E Major, Op. 8, No. 1, RV. 269, 'Spring': I. Allegro
2. Le quattro stagioni [The Four Seasons], Violin Concerto in E major Op.8 No.1 RV269, 'Spring' : II Largo
3. Le quattro stagioni [The Four Seasons], Violin Concerto in E major Op.8 No.1 RV269, 'Spring' : III Allegro
4. Le quattro stagioni [The Four Seasons], Violin Concerto in G minor Op.8 No.2 RV315, 'Summer' : I Allegro non molto
5. Le quattro stagioni [The Four Seasons], Violin Concerto in G minor Op.8 No.2 RV315, 'Summer' : II Adagio - Presto
6. Le quattro stagioni [The Four Seasons] Violin Concerto in G minor Op.8 No.2 RV315, 'Summer' : III Presto, tempo impetuoso d'estate
7. Le quattro stagioni [The Four Seasons], Violin Concerto in F major Op.8 No.3 RV293, 'Autumn' : I Allegro
8. Le quattro stagioni [The Four Seasons], Violin Concerto in F major Op.8 No.3 RV293, 'Autumn' : II Adagio
9. Le quattro stagioni [The Four Seasons], Violin Concerto in F major Op.8 No.3 RV293, 'Autumn' : III Allegro
10. Le quattro stagioni [The Four Seasons], Violin Concerto in F minor Op.8 No.4 RV297, 'Winter' : I Allegro non molto
11. Le quattro stagioni [The Four Seasons], Violin Concerto in F minor Op.8 No.4 RV297, 'Winter' : II Largo
12. Le quattro stagioni [The Four Seasons], Violin Concerto in F minor Op.8 No.4 RV297, 'Winter' : III Allegro
13. Oboe Concerto in D minor Op.8 No.9 RV454 : I Allegro
14. Oboe Concerto in D minor Op.8 No.9 RV454 : II Largo
15. Oboe Concerto in D minor Op.8 No.9 RV454 : III Allegro
16. Violin Concerto in G minor Op.8 No.8 RV332 : I Allegro
17. Violin Concerto in G minor Op.8 No.8 RV332 : II Largo
18. Violin Concerto in G minor Op.8 No.8 RV332 : III Allegro

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5 stars
5 star
1
4 star
0
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See the customer review
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Keen Reader TOP 50 REVIEWER on 3 Mar. 2015
Verified Purchase
There are countless cds offering Vivaldi’s The Four Seasons (RV 269, RV 313, RV 293, RV 297) available. Some try to offer ‘authentic’ listening, others place their own twist on the very familiar music. I have several cds of The Four Seasons in my collection already. So why would I buy another one? This one offers what I felt was a fresh viewpoint on extremely familiar music. Hearing it on the radio recently, I decided I must have it. And I’m not sorry that I purchased it, as Il Giardino Armonico (with Enrico Onofri on solo violin) are masters of Vivaldi indeed. Although recorded originally in 1994, this recording sounds as fresh and as innovative as you could wish some twenty years later. The ensemble’s interpretations and reasonings are clearly laid out in the accompanying booklet. Il Giardino Armonico’s recording of The Four Seasons is light, lyrical, totally musical and I would imagine a recording that Vivaldi himself would approve of. There is a real quality of tone and balance of strings and continuo that is highly admirable. A highly recommended recording.

The cd is rounded off with recordings of Vivaldi’s Concerto No. 9 in D minor (RV 454) and Oboe Concerto No. 8 in G minor (RV 332) with Paolo Grazzi on oboe. These are great accompaniments to The Four Seasons on this cd, and there is not a wasted moment nor an unwanted note on the whole cd. At just over an hour in total, this is a great cd, and a great testament to Il Giardino Armonico’s sympathetic interpretations of this great music. Definitely recommended.
7 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 1 review
2 of 4 people found the following review helpful
Creative, if slightly different, renderings of overly familiar material 30 July 2013
By John J. Puccio - Published on Amazon.com
You can find recordings of Vivaldi's Le Quattro stagioni (The Four Seasons) performed on period and modern instruments in arrangements for chamber orchestras, full orchestras, guitar ensembles, wooden blocks, tin drums, and glockenspiels. My own preference is for period instruments and a number of players that approximates what Vivaldi had in mind when he wrote it, so this release from Warner Classics of a 1993 recording by Giovanni Antonini and Il Giardino Armonico nicely fills the bill. The fact that they do it up quite inventively helps, too.

That said, let me continue by saying that while Il Giardino Armonico play the Seasons splendidly and while I like period instruments, I'm not entirely sure any orchestra in Vivaldi's day would have performed the concertos this way. Armonico's way with them is, to say the least, unusual by today's standards. Of course, they represent probably what any modern listener would want in a recording, considering that there are already hundreds of other, more conventional versions available. However, in the long run I'd consider the rendition of things by Il Giardino Armonico ("The Harmonious Garden") primarily an addition to one's other recordings of The Four Seasons rather than being one's only recording.

Even though Italian violinist and composer Antonio Vivaldi (1678-1741) wrote hundreds of pieces of music, most folks probably only recognize him for his Four Seasons violin concertos, those little tone poems with their chirping birds, galumphing horses, barking dogs, dripping icicles, and howling winds. Meant to accompany four descriptive sonnets, they make up the first four sections of a longer work the composer wrote in 1723 titled Il cimento dell'armonia e dell'inventione (The Contest between Harmony and Invention). People hardly remember the other concertos in the set.

I recall reading years ago that in Baroque times orchestras usually played fast movements slower than they do in subsequent eras and slow movements faster. Later, I read just the opposite. In any case, Baroque orchestras would probably have emphasized tempo contrasts among movements more vividly than we do today. If that's the case (and it's a case still debated), then Il Giardino Armonico must stand firmly behind contrast because they definitely fill their Seasons with differences and deviations from the norm. What's more, they tend to overplay Vivaldi's descriptive elements, making this an entertaining but decidedly unusual Four Seasons, one that will delight some listeners and infuriate others.

We hear from Spring onward that the Il Giardino Armonico players not only emphasize tempo changes from movement to movement but practice a volatile rubato within movements with their extreme ritardandos and accelerandos, often along with magnified dynamics. The effect is dramatic, to be sure, and fun, but Antonini and his team never convinced me that this is the way Vivaldi or his contemporaries might have performed things.

Anyway, Armonico's two most persuasive movements are in the Summer and Fall concertos, the former because the playing is the most creative, the latter because the slight hyperbole seems best to fit the occasion of drunken peasants, baying hounds, fleeing animals, dancing, and singing. Armonico's most traditional reading is of the first, Spring Concerto, wherein the players take things easy. Compared to the other concertos, it actually sounds a little mundane.

Where Armonico's style works least best is in Winter. Here, ensembles over the years have interpreted the opening moments of the first movement either by following the accompanying sonnet to the letter, that is, first slowly shivering in the cold and then quickly running and stamping to keep warm, with abrupt tempo changes between the two; or maintaining a more consistent tempo throughout. Obviously, the Armonico group elect the first option, making the shivering very slow and deliberate and the running fast and exuberant. But it's the slow, second movement that may seriously annoy some listeners. It's one of Vivaldi's most amiable, most comforting tunes, a warm, cozy number suggesting folks sitting inside a cottage by the fire, free from the wind and snow. Vivaldi intended it as a Largo and marked it "peaceful and content." With Il Giardino Armonico the music sounds like another Allegro, racing along pell-mell and losing most of its charm in the process.

We get some fine playing from the members of Il Giardino Armonico but especially from first violinist Enrico Onofri. Moreover, the disc's two other pieces, Concerto No. 8 in G minor and Concerto No. 9 in D minor, also from Il Cimento dell-Armonia e dell'Inventione, make excellent couplings because we don't hear them often enough, and their creativity is boundless. Then, too, without having to compare them to a ton of other recorded interpretations, they seem just right. These certainly come off as spirited realizations.

John J. Puccio
Classical Candor
Was this review helpful? Let us know

Customer Discussions

This product's forum
Discussion Replies Latest Post
No discussions yet

Ask questions, Share opinions, Gain insight
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in
 

Search Customer Discussions
Search all Amazon discussions
   


Look for similar items by category


Feedback