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Virgil: v.2: Aeneid bks. 7-12; Appendix Vergiliana (Loeb Classical Library): WITH Appendix Vergiliana Bks. 7-12 Hardcover – 1 Nov 2000

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Virgil: v.2: Aeneid bks. 7-12; Appendix Vergiliana (Loeb Classical Library): WITH Appendix Vergiliana Bks. 7-12 + Virgil: v.1: Eclogues; Georgics; Aeneid bks. 1-6 (Loeb Classical Library) + Catullus. Tibullus. Pervigilium Veneris (Loeb Classical Library 6): WITH Works AND Pervigilium Veneris
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Product details

  • Hardcover: 584 pages
  • Publisher: Loeb; Revised edition (1 Nov. 2000)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0674995864
  • ISBN-13: 978-0674995864
  • Product Dimensions: 3.2 x 11.4 x 16.5 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 198,968 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Virgil, born in 70 B.C., is best remembered for his masterpiece, The Aeneid. He earned great favor by portraying Augustus as a descendant of the half-god, half-man Aeneas. Although Virgil swore on his deathbed that The Aeneid was incomplete and unworthy, it has been considered one of the greatest works of Western literature for more than two thousand years.


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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Roman Clodia TOP 100 REVIEWER on 5 Aug. 2009
Format: Hardcover
Which translation of Vergil to recommend is always a problem: for the non-Latinist my choices have always been the Mandelbaum version in verse (The Aeneid (Classics)) or the West version in prose (The Aeneid (Penguin Classics), but Loeb probably comes as close to the original as you're going to get - without reading it in the original.

Goold has updated and revised the translation in 2000 and it is supple and nuanced, foregrounding the sense of elegiac loss, mourning and regret that underpins what purports to be a martial epic in celebration of Augustus and 'empire without end'.

The drawback is that split into two volumes the Loeb Aeneid costs £30 - so not cheap but essential for any student of Latin literature and, ultimately, worth every penny.
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9 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Kurt Messick HALL OF FAME on 1 Aug. 2005
Format: Hardcover
Roman society was enamoured of Greek culture -- many of the best 'Roman' things were Greek; the major gods were derivative of the Greek pantheon; philosophy, literature, science, political ideals, architecture -- all this was adopted from the Greeks. It makes sense that, at the point of their ascendancy in the world, they would long for an epic history similar to the Homeric legends; the Iliad and the Odyssey, written some 500 years after the actual events they depict, tell of the heroism of the Greeks in their battle against Troy (Ilium). The Aeneid, written by Vergil 700 years after Homer, at the commission of Augustus (himself in the process of consolidating his authority over Rome), turns the heroic victory of the much-admired Greeks on its head by postulating a survivor from Troy, Aeneas, who undergoes as journey akin to the Odyssey, even further afield.
Vergil constructs Aeneas, a very minor character in the Iliad, as the princely survivor and pilgrim from Troy, on a journey through the Mediterranean in search of a new home. According to Fitzgerald, who wrote a brief postscript to the poem, Vergil created a Homeric hero set in a Homeric age, purposefully following the Iliad and Odyssey as if they were formula, in the way that many a Hollywood director follows the formulaic pattern of past successful films. Vergil did not create the Trojan legend of Roman origins, but his poem solidified the notion in popular and scholarly sentiment.
Vergil sets the seeds for future animosity between Carthage and Rome in the Aeneid, too -- the curse of queen Dido on the descendants of Aeneas of never-ending strife played into then-recent recollections of war in the Roman mind. Books I through VI are much more studied than VII through XII, but the whole of the Aeneid is a spectacular tale.
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10 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on 15 Aug. 2003
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
The Fairclough translation offers a suitable alternative to West's prose version, and it keeps far more to the Latin than its Penguin counterpart. As ever, the Loeb (as it has a facing text and translation) will prove more useful to the Latinist than the curious litterati, and of course invaluable to schoolboys everywhere.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 4 reviews
16 of 18 people found the following review helpful
Loeb to the rescue 29 July 2005
By FrKurt Messick - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
Roman society was enamoured of Greek culture -- many of the best 'Roman' things were Greek; the major gods were derivative of the Greek pantheon; philosophy, literature, science, political ideals, architecture -- all this was adopted from the Greeks. It makes sense that, at the point of their ascendancy in the world, they would long for an epic history similar to the Homeric legends; the Iliad and the Odyssey, written some 500 years after the actual events they depict, tell of the heroism of the Greeks in their battle against Troy (Ilium). The Aeneid, written by Vergil 700 years after Homer, at the commission of Augustus (himself in the process of consolidating his authority over Rome), turns the heroic victory of the much-admired Greeks on its head by postulating a survivor from Troy, Aeneas, who undergoes as journey akin to the Odyssey, even further afield.

Vergil constructs Aeneas, a very minor character in the Iliad, as the princely survivor and pilgrim from Troy, on a journey through the Mediterranean in search of a new home. According to Fitzgerald, who wrote a brief postscript to the poem, Vergil created a Homeric hero set in a Homeric age, purposefully following the Iliad and Odyssey as if they were formula, in the way that many a Hollywood director follows the formulaic pattern of past successful films. Vergil did not create the Trojan legend of Roman origins, but his poem solidified the notion in popular and scholarly sentiment.

Vergil sets the seeds for future animosity between Carthage and Rome in the Aeneid, too -- the curse of queen Dido on the descendants of Aeneas of never-ending strife played into then-recent recollections of war in the Roman mind. Books I through VI are much more studied than VII through XII, but the whole of the Aeneid is a spectacular tale.

True to the Loeb translations generally, this offers the Latin text on one page and an English translation on the facing page; this translation is done by G.P. Goold, working from H.R. Fairclough's standard edition (which is also used for the first half of the Aeneid, in the first volume of the Loeb printing). The translations are careful and work more at being faithful to the text in literal without being choppy manner; poetic license (which can often wreak havoc on a comparison of original language to translation analyses) is kept to a minimum, but not entirely absent here.

Vergil died before he could complete the story. He wished it to be burned; fortunately, Augustus had other ideas. Still, there are incomplete lines and thoughts, and occasional conflicts in the storyline that one assumes might have been worked out in the end, had more editing time been available. Despite these, the Aeneid remains a masterpiece, and the Loeb editions will remain standards for academic scholarship for some time to come.

This volume includes several hundred pages of additional material beyond the second half of the Aeneid, the so-called minor poems of Vergil. These are similarly translated, and quite interesting, even if often overlooked in favour of the Aeneid in most classes.

Indeed, even the second half of the Aeneid is often overlooked, making this a very rare volume - it is hard to find a complete copy of the Aeneid in Latin, even in a two-volume edition. Loeb to the rescue!
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
Epic poetry at its best 12 July 2008
By Christopher H. - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
The sadly ignored second half of the Aeneid does not deserve its consignment to the dust-bin. I have always enjoyed the Loeb format (Latin on the left, English on the right) which allows one to read the Latin with or without the crutch, as one chooses. The Harvard University Press has done a lovely job as usual with Aeneas's Italian adventures. Textual notes are helpful, alternate readings and manuscript discrepancies being listed at the bottom of the page; the index of proper names is useful and exhaustive; and the Appendix Vergiliana is a delightful glimpse into the little-known world of mediocre Latin poetry. Everyone should have the pleasure -- nay, the privilege -- of reading the Aeneid in Latin once in his or her life, and the Loeb edition is an excellent text by which to do it.
Five Stars 8 Jun. 2015
By agcemom - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
My daughter loves this compact style of this book.
1 of 3 people found the following review helpful
A good Loeb 15 Oct. 2014
By Samuel Brown - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
A good Loeb. That is to say, a relatively recent addition. Nothing's worse than trying to make your way through a translation more convoluted than the original.
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