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Violin Concertos (Mullova/Mullova Ensemble)

Johann Sebastian Bach Audio CD
5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
Price: £32.86 & FREE Delivery in the UK. Details
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Product details

  • Audio CD (5 Oct 2000)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Label: Philips
  • ASIN: B0000041DG
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 194,979 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

1. Con in a for vn, strs and bc, BWV 1041: I.
2. Con in a for vn, strs and bc, BWV 1041: II. Andante
3. Con in a for vn, strs and bc, BWV 1041: III. Allegro assai
4. Con in E for vn, strs and bc, BWV 1042: I. Allegro
5. Con in E for vn, strs and bc, BWV 1042: II. Adagio
6. Con in E for vn, strs and bc, BWV 1042: III. Allegro assai
7. Con in g for vn, strs and bc, BWV 1056: I. -
8. Con in g for vn, strs and bc, BWV 1056: II. Largo
9. Con in g for vn, strs and bc, BWV 1056: III. Presto
10. Con in c for ob, vn, strs and bc, BWV 1060: I. Allegro
11. Con in c for ob, vn, strs and bc, BWV 1060: II. Adagio
12. Con in c for ob, vn, strs and bc, BWV 1060: III. Allegro

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews
0 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A discovery 18 Mar 2012
These interpretations, by the wonderful Mullova, that I wanted to know after falling in her Vivaldi, are once more a delight of a virtuose interpreter who has creativity, invention and will, I think, become a reference in the violin of the 21 th century. fantastic.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 5.0 out of 5 stars  5 reviews
19 of 21 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Rare Treat 20 July 2002
By "tlyyra" - Published on Amazon.com
What is it with the American audiences and Viktoria Mullova? This superb artist has never enjoyed more than a token recognition on this continent, and along the way her recordings have quietly disappeared from the catalog and from the store shelves. There is no greater shame than deleting (or no longer importing) her Bach Partitas for solo violin (also on Philips), one of the true desert island discs of our era. In Mullova we have one of those extemely rare artists who (like Richter or Pollini on the piano) wholly transform the way you hear not only the instrument being played but also the composition served by that instrument.
If you never saw the point of either the violin as such or for that matter Bach, listen to these stunning performances and be silenced forever. There are one or two other great violinists active today with comparable talent (mention only Gidon Kremer), but the rest are put into their place soon after these wonderfully lively, precise, astonishingly vivid, and brilliantly characterized performances carry you through the first bars. A high-power player where needed (hear her Brahms concerto), Mullova has learned much from the period instrument movement and here produces a seductively lean, sinewy sound that doesn't miss a nuance of expression, all in exquisite taste. Superbly accompanied by a relatively small orchestra handpicked for the purpose, she articulates every note, phrase and line of these lovely works with unheard-of subtlety and incomparable assurance, without as much as a passing moment of dullness or lifeless tone. This is Bach playing of the highest order, and the musical intelligence of the performers shines through in a natural sound of the excellent Philips recording. If there was such a thing as Fischer-Dieskau on strings, this would be it. As exemplary as they might be in other company, you'll never go back to Accardo, Grumiaux, or even Kremer in these works - to say nothing of the others (but keep your Oistrakh for the memories). This is on a level of its own and you will judge the rest with these performances as the standard.
In terms of sheer violin technique and control, Mullova has no match, whether in the past or the present, and for further evidence of her flawless musicianship look for her recordings, first and foremost, of the two Prokofiev sonatas, given idiomatic and simply mindblowing performances with the great Polish piano talent Piotr Anderszewski - likely to blow you off your feet, whatever the period you might be into. It is time to leave the historical performances where they belong (archival shelves) and let fresh air in through magnificent new recordings such as those few that are available by this remarkable musician. And with the superior recording technology you get to hear how the violin actually sounds in a physical space.
One hopeless request: You may still be able pick up Mullova's Stravinsky, Bartok, Debussy, Janacek, Shostakovich, and Prokofiev during your holiday trip to Europe or Japan, but will the commercial record company sales projections ever allow us the pleasure of hearing her in the other great works of modern violin literature she has tackled on the concert stage, most urgently the Berg concerto?
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Violin Concertos 1 Feb 2013
By Bjorn Viberg - Published on Amazon.com
Violin Concertos is a 1996 Philips Classics Productions starring violinist Viktoria Mullowa and the Mullowa Ensemble. Malcolm Boyd has written the music notes. Truly a magnificent recording. Highly recommended. 5/5.
9 of 14 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Rare Treat 20 July 2002
By "tlyyra" - Published on Amazon.com
What is it with the American audiences and Viktoria Mullova? This superb artist has never enjoyed more than a token recognition on this continent, and along the way her recordings have quietly disappeared from the catalog and from the store shelves. There is no greater shame than deleting (or no longer importing) her Bach Partitas for solo violin (also on Philips), one of the true desert island discs of our era. In Mullova we have one of those extemely rare artists who (like Richter or Pollini on the piano) wholly transform the way you hear not only the instrument being played but also the composition served by that instrument.
If you never saw the point of either the violin as such or for that matter Bach, listen to these stunning performances and be silenced forever. There are one or two other great violinists active today with comparable talent (mention only Gidon Kremer), but the rest are put into their place soon after these wonderfully lively, precise, astonishingly vivid, and brilliantly characterized performances carry you through the first bars. A high-power player where needed (hear her Brahms concerto), Mullova has learned much from the period instrument movement and here produces a seductively lean, sinewy sound that doesn't miss a nuance of expression, all in exquisite taste. Superbly accompanied by a relatively small orchestra handpicked for the purpose, she articulates every note, phrase and line of these lovely works with unheard-of subtlety and incomparable assurance, without as much as a passing moment of dullness or lifeless tone. This is Bach playing of the highest order, and the musical intelligence of the performers shines through in a natural sound of the excellent Philips recording. If there was such a thing as Fischer-Dieskau on strings, this would be it. As exemplary as they might be in other company, you'll never go back to Accardo, Grumiaux, or even Kremer in these works - to say nothing of the others (but keep your Oistrakh for the memories). This is on a level of its own and you will judge the rest with these performances as a standard.
In terms of sheer violin technique and control, Mullova has no match, whether in the past or the present, and for further evidence of her flawless musicianship look for her recordings, first and foremost, of the two Prokofiev sonatas, given idiomatic and simply mindblowing performances with the great Polish piano talent Piotr Anderszewski - likely to blow you off your feet, whatever the period you might be into. It is time to leave the historical performances where they belong (archival shelves) and let fresh air in through magnificent new recordings such as those few that are available by this remarkable musician. And with the superior recording technology you get to hear how the violin actually sounds in a physical space.
One hopeless request: You may still be able pick up Mullova's Stravinsky, Bartok, Debussy, Janacek, Shostakovich, and Prokofiev during your holiday trip to Europe or Japan, but will the commercial record company sales projections ever allow us the pleasure of hearing her in the other great works of modern violin literature she has tackled on the concert stage, most urgently the Berg concerto?
2 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars please read this plea! 18 July 2004
By C. Oran Ball - Published on Amazon.com
Verified Purchase
The duplicated review following this one is a MUST read
for any who love the violin. Two underwritings:
1. This woman's musicianship and skill are
without equal.
2. The difficulty in finding a copy of her
many wonderful recordings is in great need
of resolution...(is there any such thing as
a reprint!!?)
2 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Mendelssohn Cto E m by Viktoria Mullova (Philips) 26 Sep 2005
By C. Nakajima - Published on Amazon.com
Not much of a reviewer per se but have listened to CD recordings of Mendelssohn's piece by at least half dozen or so classical artists including venerable Menuhin. Xue-Wei takes honors for most delicately beautiful rendition, but Viktoria's is most bright-almost brilliant, vibrant, with the deft parambuco. Isaac Stern played it like a master on Sony Classical. Vikki's is the Gold-Standard--when one recalls the music, one cannot help but remember that her performance is THE way it should be.
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