On Violence (Harvest Book) and over 2 million other books are available for Amazon Kindle . Learn more
£5.24
  • RRP: £6.99
  • You Save: £1.75 (25%)
FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £10.
In stock.
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon.
Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
Add to Basket
Trade in your item
Get a £0.25
Gift Card.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

On Violence (Harvest Book) Paperback – 30 Mar 1970


See all 5 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
£5.81
Paperback
"Please retry"
£5.24
£2.41 £0.50

Frequently Bought Together

On Violence (Harvest Book) + The Human Condition
Price For Both: £17.62

Buy the selected items together
  • The Human Condition £12.38

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Product details

  • Paperback: 120 pages
  • Publisher: Harcourt Publishers,U.S. (30 Mar 1970)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0156695006
  • ISBN-13: 978-0156695008
  • Product Dimensions: 20.3 x 13.5 x 0.7 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 4,730 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, and more.

Inside This Book (Learn More)
First Sentence
THESE REFLECTIONS were provoked by the events and debates of the last few years as seen against the background of the twentieth century, which has become indeed, as Lenin predicted, a century of wars and revolutions, hence a century of that violence which is currently believed to be their common denominator. Read the first page
Explore More
Concordance
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Excerpt | Index | Back Cover
Search inside this book:

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By demola on 27 Oct 2010
Format: Paperback
Is violence inevitable? Is it rational or beastly? Does it justify its ends and is there an end to it? I thought this book a very informative and useful essay in tackling these questions and in examining violence as a tool in the domination of man by man. Arendt takes time to distinguish between "power" and "violence" and then to explain how the slippage of power by those "in power" prompts them to use violence as one means of hanging on to power. I'd never looked at it that way before and it then seemed self-evident when I considered say the politics of the 70s for example in Africa or Latin America or even in the West in the 21st century where violence against Iraqis was a means for a certain President and Prime Minister to keep and increase their power bases.

Arendt drives home her point with extensive references to 60s/70s America and the French student revolutions as well as the Marxian struggle between labour and capital. One of the earlier reviews cast Arendt as a New Left basher. I thought she bashed all apologists while also recognising that violence may be a last resort for getting one's voice heard when other avenues are shut or ineffective. No doubt there's a lot of other material out there on this and perhaps reading some might help provide perspective for newbies, like me, to the topic. Nevertheless I think Arendt's book is worth reading.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
39 of 49 people found the following review helpful By ldxar1 on 3 Sep 2007
Format: Paperback
This short pamphlet consists of a polemic against the New Left followed by a laying-out of Arendt's own views on the relationship between violence and power. The first part consists of an attack on student radicals with intermittent swipes at Fanon and Sartre. The latter draws distinctions between power, violence and authority, before presenting an argument that the state is based on power rather than violence and that it depends on consent. It also presents arguments for a civic "political" commitment against both bureaucracy and new social movements. The argument is dependent on Arendt's "The Human Condition" at several points, and reads as rather speculative and assertive rather than demonstrative.

There are several reasons I'm not particularly impressed with this pamphlet. The first is that the author basically makes a straw-man of her opponents. The views attributed to the amorphously defined "New Left" - such as that violence founds society, that it is a means to achieve immortality, that violence is natural, that a primordial will to dominate is fundamental - are not properly sourced and basically do not occur in the literature Arendt is implicitly referring to (Marcuse, Sartre, Fanon, Negri, Situationism, etc). She rarely references her opponents at all, ignoring their theories - the only exception being Fanon, who is quoted selectively and without any reference to his ontological and structural theories. She thus offers an argument for a view (that violence is instrumental, not constitutive) that her opponents would probably not dispute.

The impression left is that Arendt does not understand the kind of structural critique of liberalism/capitalism which New Left authors pursue.
Read more ›
2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
By Kathleen Conner on 29 Nov 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Very good book indeed. Very useful for my study course. Very insightful and illuminating. Would recommend it to read definitely.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Ms. Emma Mcclelland on 16 Mar 2010
Format: Paperback
This is a brilliant book for students or academics researching political violence. Arendt looks at violence as a phenomenon in its own right and differentiates it from terms like "power", "force" and "strength".
This is the best possible book to buy if you want to know how and why violence occurs in human affairs.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again


Feedback