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Da Vinci Code Decoded (Disinformation Movie & Book Guides) Paperback – 7 Feb 2004


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Product details

  • Paperback: 200 pages
  • Publisher: DISINFORMATION COMPANY LTD (7 Feb 2004)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0972952977
  • ISBN-13: 978-0972952972
  • Product Dimensions: 13.7 x 1.3 x 19 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 2.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (15 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,211,086 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Customer Reviews

2.6 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

35 of 37 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 7 Nov 2004
Format: Paperback
While the author clearly knows his stuff, this book is desperately disappointing. Dry, poorly structured and rambling, the "Da Vinci Code Decoded" simply regurgitates the information presented so skillfully in Dan Brown's book and adds to it a mass of only mildy relevant information. It would be great to find a book that does a good job of looking at the truth behind the "Da Vinci Code" - this one certainly doesn't.
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28 of 30 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 18 Oct 2004
Format: Paperback
I'd thoroughly enjoyed the Da Vinci Code, and I was interested to know how much of it WAS fact. I hoped this book would give me the answers.
Well... it does, sometimes. However, to get to the answers you have to read possibly the worst-edited book I have had the misfortune to trawl through. The typographical errors and the poor layout remind me of a first year undergraduate's essays - unforgiveable in a book written by such an eminent historian as this. It looks and feels like something thrown together in haste as the bandwagon gathered speed. I don't regret buying it (it's cheap but at least it wasn't too costly) but I'd have been embarrassed to, say, have given it as a gift.
It's also almost as full of questions as the Da Vinci Code itself, and the answers it gives are not vastly more authoritative - full footnotes and references would have inspired more confidence.
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60 of 65 people found the following review helpful By Ms. K. Tomlinson on 26 Feb 2005
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This is without doubt the worst "history" book I have ever had the misfortune to read. Whether Lunn actually researched his material or sat and googled it is debatable. An example is the chapter on the supposed marriage of Christ. Lunn contradicts himself in two paragraphs. One saying that Mary Magdalene is often mistake for Mary of Bethany incorrectly and another saying that they are the same person. (Incidentally it is not true that they are the same person.)
His argument for Jesus's marriage to Magdalene rests on the incident of Lazarus's death and Mary of Bethany's behaviour there (having already denied that they are the same person) and the wedding that is mentioned in John. This passage in John makes it very clear that Jesus is merely a guest there and the Mary in question there is his mother. However, since Lunn appears not to have bothered reading the gospel, it is no surprise that this didn't deter him.
In short, he presents a contradictory argument, full of holes and often merely his own opinion with no evidence to back it up. The rest of the book follows a similar pattern.
Do not waste your money on this book unless you are a history student seeking a good example of how not to write an essay.
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43 of 48 people found the following review helpful By Mrs. J. A. Collins on 4 Dec 2004
Format: Paperback
This is one of the worst-written books I've read for a very long time.
I've got a strong interest in the subject matter, but Mr Lunn's writing is almost unreadable. Clearly being a 'top historian' doesn't mean he has an actual skills with the English language.
Aside from the dreadful writing, I found it difficult to regard the research in this book as accurate, as there were several factual mistakes made when referring to Dan Brown's book. If one was writing a critique/examination of a novel, I'd think the least thing you could do would be to actually make correct references to that novel - otherwise I think your credibility suffers, as is the case with this book. An example was Mr Lunn making some snide comment about Brown wrongly writing that the Temple Chapel was undamaged during World War II, when a brief look back at the relevant part of The Da Vinci Code shows Brown says the Chapel was bombed by the Luftwaffe. I'm disclined to trust the research of a historian who fails to get simple facts right; after all, how do I know what else he's got wrong in his book?
In short: avoid this book. There are a lot of similar ones around, and I'm sure they'll be better than this effort.
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48 of 54 people found the following review helpful By The Caped Crusader on 30 Jan 2005
Format: Paperback
Having read Dan Brown's gifted piece of writing, and having read "Decoded's" review, I was looking forward to some challenging explanations. I was sadly mistaken. The Da Vinci Code Decoded is one of the worst books I have read for many years. The author has several axes to grind - one being anti Dan Brown. He may well have gained a masters in History but his other qualification (that of being a journalist) comes to the fore. The publication is badly planned and executed - it's a mess - a jumble of doubtful "facts". The only reason that it gains one star from me is because there is no category for no stars. Don't waste your hard earned cash.
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125 of 147 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 7 May 2004
Format: Paperback
After recently reading Dan Brown's Da Vinci Code I wanted to learn more about what Da Vinci wrote. I have always been intersested in the Holy Grail and the Divinity of Christ and wanted to learn more. After reading Martin Lunn's book I think I can safely say that he covers all areas with an authority no-one has tried before. He doesn't try to be objective in any way, he just states what he knows and leaves you to make up your own mind. If you enjoyed Dan Brown's novel then this is a must read follow up explaining everything Da Vinci wrote or painted or invented.
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105 of 128 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 16 May 2004
Format: Paperback
When I read Dan Brown's "The Da Vinci Code", I felt like my world was falling apart, intellectually. I sensed an overwhelming truth behind the ideas presented in that book - ideas that were so at odds, so contrary to what I had been raised and educated to believe all my life. After reading Lunn's book, I now understand why I felt that way, and specifically what those powerful truths are. Its a refreshing new way of interpreting both history and religion. I can never look at Christianity or the history of Europe the same way again. If you want to really know what Brown was talking about in his novel - who the Priory of Sion and the Merovingians really are, what their secrets really are, and how they have affected world history - read this book. The implications are earth-shattering.
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