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Victorian Narrative Painting Paperback – Illustrated, 1 Jan 2000


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Product details

  • Paperback: 111 pages
  • Publisher: Tate Publishing (1 Jan. 2000)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1854373188
  • ISBN-13: 978-1854373182
  • Product Dimensions: 22.2 x 1 x 27.9 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 958,465 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Dr R TOP 500 REVIEWER on 19 Dec. 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Narrative painting, which had its origins in earlier Dutch and Flemist art, was one of the most popular genres for Victorian artists although initially there was a strong belief that painting could not reflect a narrative story because its images were fixed in time and were unable to develop to tell a story. This led to artists using diptychs and triptychs to show different points in a time frame, to paint a series of paintings, as pioneered by Hogarth in the 18th century, or to producing very large works within which different groups of motifs could reflect an unfolding story which could then be "read" by an informed and receptive public.

Additional information could be gleaned from the title of the work and by additional information, such as verses from a poem or biblical texts, placed alongside the painting. Other paintings revealed their story by reference to a biblical parable, Shakespearean play or fable. A key part of such a painting was its moral, a central theme of Victorian times. For a person to understand and appreciate the moral they first had to relate to the characters displayed and this required that a Realistic style be adopted (it was hard to relate to a fairy or a mythological figure). However, as the author points out, excessive realism, such as that adopted by Luke Fildes in "Applicants for admission to a Casual Ward", 1874, failed because its realism was too heavy-handed.

In the introduction to this book, published in 2000, Julia Thomas considers the origins of narrative painting, its different types, how narrative works are read and how the narrative picture became to be equated with the English (or, more accurately, the English + Scottish) style.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By PEBL on 7 Mar. 2010
Format: Paperback
What this book lacks in size, it makes up for in content covering subjects such as childhood, love, sex, marriage and death within Victorian narrative art. The book covers work by such artists as Augustus Leopold Egg, Luke Fildes, William Powell Frith, William Holman Hunt and David Wilkie,
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