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Verdi: Un giorno di regno

Jessye Norman Audio CD
4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
Price: £43.33
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Jessye Norman is one of the most celebrated artists of our century. She is also among the most distinguished in a long line of American sopranos who refused to believe in limits, a shining member of an artistic pantheon that has included Rosa Ponselle, Maria Callas, Leontyne Price and now this daughter of Augusta, Georgia. "Pigeonholing," said Norman, "is only interesting to ... Read more in Amazon's Jessye Norman Store

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Product details

  • Orchestra: Royal Philharmonic
  • Conductor: Lamberto Gardelli
  • Composer: Giuseppe Verdi
  • Audio CD (12 Oct 1989)
  • SPARS Code: ADD
  • Number of Discs: 2
  • Label: Philips
  • ASIN: B00000410H
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 49,799 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Listen to Samples and Buy MP3s

Songs from this album are available to purchase as MP3s. Click on "Buy MP3" or view the MP3 Album.
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                         


Disc 1:

Samples
Song TitleArtist Time Price
Listen  1. Verdi: Un giorno di regno - OvertureRoyal Philharmonic Orchestra 5:29£0.79  Buy MP3 
Listen  2. Verdi: Un giorno di regno / Act 1 - "Mai non rise un più bel dì"Ambrosian Singers 2:01£0.79  Buy MP3 
Listen  3. Verdi: Un giorno di regno / Act 1 - "Tesoriere garbatissimo"Vincenzo Sardinero 3:14£0.79  Buy MP3 
Listen  4. Verdi: Un giorno di regno / Act 1 - "Sua Maestà, signori"Ingvar Wixell 1:29£0.79  Buy MP3 
Listen  5. Verdi: Un giorno di regno / Act 1 - "Compagnoni di Parigi" - "Verrà pur troppo il giorno"Ingvar Wixell 5:06£0.79  Buy MP3 
Listen  6. Verdi: Un giorno di regno / Act 1 - "Al doppio matrimonio" - "Sire tremante io vengo"José Carreras 1:49£0.79  Buy MP3 
Listen  7. Verdi: Un giorno di regno / Act 1 - "Proverò che degno io sono" - "Infiammato da spirto guerriero"José Carreras 7:14£0.79  Buy MP3 
Listen  8. Verdi: Un giorno di regno / Act 1 - "Ah, non m'hanno ingannata!" - "Grave a core innamorato"Fiorenza Cossotto 5:38£0.79  Buy MP3 
Listen  9. Verdi: Un giorno di regno / Act 1 - "Sì festevola mattina"Jessye Norman 2:39£0.79  Buy MP3 
Listen10. Verdi: Un giorno di regno / Act 1 - "Non san quant'io nel petto" - "Non vo' quel vecchio, non son sì sciocca"Jessye Norman 5:58£0.79  Buy MP3 
Listen11. Verdi: Un giorno di regno / Act 1 - "Ebben, Giulietta mia"Jessye Norman 1:47£0.79  Buy MP3 
Listen12. Verdi: Un giorno di regno / Act 1 - "Cara Giulia, alfin ti vedo" - "Madamine, il mio scudiere" - "In te, cugina, io spero"Fiorenza Cossotto 7:48£0.79  Buy MP3 
Listen13. Verdi: Un giorno di regno / Act 1 - "Bella speranza invero"Fiorenza Cossotto 4:49£0.79  Buy MP3 
Listen14. Verdi: Un giorno di regno / Act 1 - "Quanto diceste mostra un gran talento"Ingvar Wixell 1:10£0.79  Buy MP3 
Listen15. Verdi: Un giorno di regno / Act 1 - "Diletto genero, a voi ne vengo"Vincenzo Sardinero 4:06£0.79  Buy MP3 
Listen16. Verdi: Un giorno di regno / Act 1 - "Tesorier! io creder voglio" - "In qual punto il Re ci ha colto!" - "Affidate alla mente reale"Fiorenza Cossotto10:03Album Only


Disc 2:

Samples
Song TitleArtist Time Price
Listen  1. Verdi: Un giorno di regno / Act 2 - "Ma le nozze non si fanno?"José Carreras 3:08£0.79  Buy MP3 
Listen  2. Verdi: Un giorno di regno / Act 2 - "Pietoso al lungo pianto" - "Deh, lasciate a un'alma amante"José Carreras 6:45£0.79  Buy MP3 
Listen  3. Verdi: Un giorno di regno / Act 2 - "Bene, scudiero, vi retrovo in tempo" - "Un mio castello! cinque mila scudi!"Jessye Norman 1:21£0.79  Buy MP3 
Listen  4. Verdi: Un giorno di regno / Act 2 - "Tutte l'armi si può prendere"Vincenzo Sardinero 7:18£0.79  Buy MP3 
Listen  5. Verdi: Un giorno di regno / Act 2 - "Ch'io non posso il ver comprendere?"Fiorenza Cossotto 5:01£0.79  Buy MP3 
Listen  6. Verdi: Un giorno di regno / Act 2 - "Nipote, in quest'istante"Fiorenza Cossotto0:29£0.39  Buy MP3 
Listen  7. Verdi: Un giorno di regno / Act 2 - "Perché dunque non vien?" - "Sì, scordar saprò l'infido"Fiorenza Cossotto 6:48£0.79  Buy MP3 
Listen  8. Verdi: Un giorno di regno / Act 2 - "Oh me felice appieno!" - "Ah! non sia, mio ben, fallace"Jessye Norman 8:06£0.79  Buy MP3 
Listen  9. Verdi: Un giorno di regno / Act 2 - "Sì, caro conte!"Fiorenza Cossotto 1:11£0.79  Buy MP3 
Listen10. Verdi: Un giorno di regno / Act 2 - "A tal colpo preparata"Fiorenza Cossotto 3:13£0.79  Buy MP3 
Listen11. Verdi: Un giorno di regno / Act 2 - "Sire, venne in quest'istante" - "Eh! facciamo da buoni amici"Fiorenza Cossotto 4:01£0.79  Buy MP3 


Customer Reviews

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4.8 out of 5 stars
4.8 out of 5 stars
Most Helpful Customer Reviews
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
By Luca
Format:Audio CD
The bad flop of the 1840 La Scala premiere definitively signed the destine of Verdi's second opera. Neither its 1845, not so badly welcomed, reprise as "Il finto Stanislao", in Venice, changed very much the standing of this underrated work in the repertory, also because Verdi himself substantially repudiated it.

But, the general opinion is that the flop was not due to the intrinsic value of the opera.
The main problem was that, for the sophisticated audience of La Scala, the work sounded irremediably old-fashioned.
As a matter of fact, Romani and Verdi had a very short time to prepare it.
Felice Romani (1788-1865), for the novice Verdi, hurriedly recycled an old work dated 1818, based on the play "Le faux Stanislas" by Alexandre Vincent Pineux-Duval (1776-1842). The libretto had been already used by Adalbert Gyrowetz (or Vojtěch Jírovec, 1763-1850) for his opera "Il finto Stanislao", premiered in Milan (!) that year.
Besides, during the composition, Verdi lost his two children and their mother Margherita Barezzi.
Another element is that the only available cast for the premiere was not accustomed to the buffo or comic genres.
In a few words, everything seemed to plot against Verdi's new opera.

But, obviously, today, while listening to old operas, we are not looking for fashionable or "new" works, but for works which maintain their artistic value during the centuries. Besides, to listen to a really comic opera from Verdi - Falstaff has also a melancholic vein - is completely unusual and this gives to the work a renewed freshness.

The result is that we here have the occasion to listen to a very pleasant and well built opera. Felice Romani was a very skilled librettist and a real artistic talent.
Read more ›
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
By Ralph Moore TOP 50 REVIEWER
Format:Audio CD
Having made a survey of the Philips "Early Verdi Project", I left this, Verdi's second opera, until last, being influenced by the received wisdom that it was an irremediable failure. Certainly Verdi regarded it with contempt and it since has mostly been consigned to oblivion apart from a few stuttering revivals. It is clearly heavily indebted to Donizetti and, especially in finales, Rossini, but it is still a very well crafted and entertaining work, sparkling and engaging if not exactly funny.

And just look at the cast: a roll-call of great singers of the early 70's, headed by Carreras in finest youthful voice; he sings his arias with a winning combination of elegance and passion. I often think that his contribution to this series represents Carreras's most valuable, enduring and admirable work, and he is surrounded by singers of equal quality. What a pleasure to hear Wixells' grainy, characterful baritone; his Italian, both sung and spoken is exemplary and he relishes his role as a royal impersonator. Cossotto, a few intrusive aspirates in her runs apart, sings magnificently, whie Jessye Norman, mushy Italian notwithstanding, treats us to her lovely legato and breadth of phrasing. Supporting roles are cast from strength, not least Vincenzo Sardinero's handsome baritone and Ganzarolli's ripe bass as the Barone di Kelbar - a cousin to Don Magnifico in "La Cenerentola" and every other grasping, social-climber of a father in opera buffa who wants to marry off his daughters profitably.

There are glimpses of the Verdi to come, such as his exploitation of the expressive and versatile possibilities of 3/4 time signatures, but although Verdi shows himself a master of the idiom, he writes somewhat dutifully and formulaically.
Read more ›
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5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars 26 July 2014
Format:Audio CD|Verified Purchase
Fantastic Caballé!!!
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1 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Only studio recording 3 July 2010
Format:Audio CD
This is the only studio recording ever made of Verdi's second opera, an immense flop at it's La Scala premiere in 1840. It's no masterpiece, Verdi himself would have nothing to do with it after it's one and only performance in Milan, actively dissuading further productions during his lifetime. One could hardly imagine a better case being made for this work, the cast is excellent, the conducting fizzes and the work comes across as an enjoyable but highly forgettable footnote to Verdi's output. The opera has never been and will never be part of the standard repertoire, even Verdi Festivals seem to run shy of it. Perhaps Verdi was right to shun it.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 5.0 out of 5 stars  8 reviews
15 of 15 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars This is supposed to be Verdi at his worst??? 14 Sep 2006
By Aram V. Barsamian - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD
Most opera lovers know that this was Verdi's second opera and first fiasco. The failure of Un giorno di regno hit him so hard that he almost gave up his career as a composer. As reasons for the fiasco we are told that while Verdi was composing this opera buffa, his wife and two children died. It is understandable that someone dealing with such personal tragedy may not be in the best mental state to write a comic opera. And that is all most of us know about this opera.

But after hearing this recording, I think it is completely unfair to apologize on Verdi's behalf. Un giorno di regno is absolutely delightful. Sure, it's not hysterically funny, like Rossini's comic operas, but the music is extremely well-crafted. Verdi really did know what he was doing even though he was still in his 20s. Listen to the Marchesa's beautiful big aria in Act II, with its graceful chromaticism, ornamentation and cadenzas. It's gorgeous stuff, almost reminiscent of Bellini. There is plenty of wonderfully energetic music. Perhaps taking his cue from Rossini and La Cenerentola, Verdi wrote TWO wonderful buffo duets (Treasurer/Baron). Many of the pages of Il corsaro, Alzira, Attila and Giovanna d'Arco strike me as uninspired "filler". But I do not get that feeling with Un giorno di regno. I think Verdi did a great job... mostly...

Bless his heart, he did not quite know the capabilities of the human voice yet. The soprano roles are actually quite low, with the Marchesa regularly dipping down to low Cs, Bs and As. The soprano lead in Verdi's first opera, Oberto, also descends below the staff on a regular basis. The men's roles, however are all very high. Verdi did not write many high Cs for his tenors. I can think of one case in which Verdi asks his tenors to sing a high C: Otello ("cortigiaaaaaNA!") and a high D: I vespri siciliani. But here Verdi asks the tenor to sing a high C and hold it (in the act II aria). All three of the bass/baritone buffos regularly ascend to high Es, Fs and F-sharps.

Now, the performance. It's marvelous. First of all, Fiorenza Cossotto is just perfect as the Marchesa. Beautiful tone, personality, coloratura, high notes, low notes -- she's got it all. Not a single note is strained or forced. Jessye Norman is quite obviously out of her element here. Much of what she does is lovely and cute, but when surrounded by the likes of Cossotto and Carreras, it becomes apparent that she is simply not very idiomatic here. The Italian is not good, especially in recitatives. Her intonation is sometimes off. But one can hear that she is an intelligent singing actress.

Carreras is heavenly. In 1974 he was at the beginning of his career and the voice is handsome, full, unforced and soaring. The high C I mentioned earlier is magnificent! Ingvar Wixell does a great job as well. His voice is resonant, full of color and his delivery is appropriately humorous. He handles the high tessitura of his aria very skillfully. Vicente Sardinero was, I think, a very underrated artist. He had a glorious baritone, well displayed on the recording of Puccini's second opera, Edgar. Here he is the Treasurer and sings beautifully. Vladimiro Ganzarolli is the Baron. Gorgeous bass! He also handles the high tessitura wonderfully and infuses his delivery with great comic colors.

You just can't lose with this recording. The music is delightful -- a real testament to what Verdi was capable of, even in the worst of circumstances. This opera really needs no apology. The performances are great. The price is low. There is just no down-side. Get it and let us know what you think of it.
10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great Early Verdi with an Enjoyable Performance 12 Nov 2002
By Matthew Hannigan - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD
While this is not necessarily the Verdi most are familiar with, this second opera is still very much an enjoyable Verdian opera. It will not take long to recognize the Rossini influence, however Verdi has polished the style and has made it his own. Being one of only two comedies he composed, it's lighter tones will further differentiate it from what one is accustomed to, but Verdi seems quite comfortable with it. As for the performance, while I've only heard this one, I liked it very much.
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Charming and accomplished - and just look at the cast 15 July 2010
By Ralph Moore - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD
Having made a survey of the Philips "Early Verdi Project", I left this, Verdi's second opera, until last, being influenced by the received wisdom that it was an irremediable failure. Certainly Verdi regarded it with contempt and it since has mostly been consigned to oblivion apart from a few stuttering revivals. It is clearly heavily indebted to Donizetti and, especially in finales, Rossini, but it is still a very well crafted and entertaining work, sparkling and engaging if not exactly funny.

And just look at the cast: a roll-call of great singers of the early 70's, headed by Carreras in finest youthful voice; he sings his arias with a winning combination of elegance and passion. I often think that his contribution to this series represents Carreras's most valuable, enduring and admirable work, and he is surrounded by singers of equal quality. What a pleasure to hear Wixells' grainy, characterful baritone; his Italian, both sung and spoken is exemplary and he relishes his role as a royal impersonator. Cossotto, a few intrusive aspirates in her runs apart, sings magnificently, whie Jessye Norman, mushy Italian not withstanding, treats us to her lovely legato and breadth of phrasing. Supporting roles are cast from strength, not least Vincenzo Sardinero's handsome baritone and Ganzarolli's ripe bass as the Barone di Kelbar - a cousin to Don Magnifico in "La Cenerentola" and every other grasping, social-climber of a father in opera buffa who wants to marry off his daughters profitably.

There are glimpses of the Verdi to come, such as his exploitation of the expressive and versatile possibilities of 3/4 time signatures, but although Verdi shows himself a master of the idiom, he writes somewhat dutifully and formulaically. This is not his true Fach and the subject matter is clearly not congenial to him.; the result is a derivative and retrospective opera with little of the originality which marks out those operas of the early 1840's written once he had begun to find his true voice. No wonder "Nabucco" made such an impact subsequently. Understandably, Romani's workmanlike, if flawed, libretto did not ignite the composer's fantasy the way Boito was able to do with "Falstaff", Verdi's next comedy, whose premiere was a mere fifty-three years later. Nonetheless, this sole extant recording of "Un giorno di re" does not deserve neglect; it is worth repeated hearings for the quality of the singing alone and deserves its sobriquet as the one of the best scores Donizetti never wrote.
5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars THIS OPERA IS GREAT 28 Aug 2003
By Mario Gonzalez Dorado - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD
If you want to know what joy of singing is, try listening to this opera. It's really great. Terrific. You'll find joy in it, and you'll never think you've lost your money because you've bought it.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A very pleasant and unusual Verdi in an incomparable studio performance. 15 Mar 2013
By Luca - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD
The bad flop of the 1840 La Scala premiere definitively signed the destine of Verdi's second opera. Neither its 1845, not so badly welcomed, reprise as "Il finto Stanislao", in Venice, changed very much the standing of this underrated work in the repertory, also because Verdi himself substantially repudiated it.

But, the general opinion is that the flop was not due to the intrinsic value of the opera.
The main problem was that, for the sophisticated audience of La Scala, the work sounded irremediably old-fashioned.
As a matter of fact, Romani and Verdi had a very short time to prepare it.
Felice Romani (1788-1865), for the novice Verdi, hurriedly recycled an old work dated 1818, based on the play "Le faux Stanislas" by Alexandre Vincent Pineux-Duval (1776-1842). The libretto had been already used by Adalbert Gyrowetz (or Vojtěch Jírovec, 1763-1850) for his opera "Il finto Stanislao", premiered in Milan (!) that year.
Besides, during the composition, Verdi lost his two children and their mother Margherita Barezzi.
Another element is that the only available cast for the premiere was not accustomed to the buffo or comic genres.
In a few words, everything seemed to plot against Verdi's new opera.

But, obviously, today, while listening to old operas, we are not looking for fashionable or "new" works, but for works which maintain their artistic value during the centuries. Besides, to listen to a really comic opera from Verdi - Falstaff has also a melancholic vein - is completely unusual and this gives to the work a renewed freshness.

The result is that we here have the occasion to listen to a very pleasant and well built opera. Felice Romani was a very skilled librettist and a real artistic talent. The narration is well developed; verses are both elegant and smart. All the characters are well outlined and depicted. Psychological insight is anything but superficial.
In short, we meet an amusing and interesting work.

The young Verdi demonstrates to perfectly master the "classical" style.
In his opera there are a lot of Rossinian features; even if he is not still refined as the old Master, Verdi adds his own mark, that is the typical musical vigor.
Harmonization is more accurate than in the average of Donizetti's operas, even if Verdi is not yet able to produce similar brainwaves.
The Romani's libretto and meter give the opera a sort of Bellinian elegance.
There is also something, in the general atmosphere, from Auber.

Besides, the vocal palette is complete and colorful, far better than in several Rossini's Neapolitan operas, where scores were literally "tenor-driven" (even six, opposite one soprano).
Arias, even if not particularly catchy, and concertati are very well developed; the use of the chorus is attentive and very effective.
In short, to our ear, the opera is fresh and really pleasant.

Even in a historical perspective, it is not so banal as often depicted. As already underlined, Verdi's vigor generates a partly innovative approach and effect; as a consequence, the work, on the whole, does not sound as merely imitative, but as a personal reinterpretation of traditional stylistic features.
In conclusion, considering this one as a first experiment and what of grand Verdi finally achieved with "Falstaff", I regret he did not pursue and cultivated also his talented vein for this genre.

Stated that, in my opinion, the material is anything but terrible (on the contrary!), what makes these two CDs a real treasure is the absolute excellence of the performance they contains.

I think we have to be really grateful to the "old" Philips for this exceptionally praiseworthy 1973 project and to have recruited a so outstanding cast for what was generally considered a largely minor, even odd, work.
Rarely we can enjoy performances so robust and artistically quite perfect in every component. Here, this aspects results particularly effective, because the "weights" of the six main roles are nearly similar.
Besides, the ages of the singers are well matched to the ages of the characters, that is another really rare feature.

José Carreras (b. 1946) is simply incredible. His Edoardo di Sanval is perfect and there is nothing to add through words: let's listen to him!

Jessye Norman (b. 1945) is a fresh and vocally wonderful Giulietta di Kelbar. Norman is often accused of a sort of affectation and coolness, but here (as, for instance, in "Il Corsaro" - with Gardelli - or in "Le nozze di Figaro" - with Colin Davis) she demonstrates to be able to be spontaneous, involved and humanly vivid. From a technical point of view, the quality of her vocal emission was already beyond question, while some non-Italian inflections are detectable in her pronunciation.

Ingvar Wixell (1931-2011) is a witty Cavaliere Belfiore, that is "Il finto Stanislao". My only reservation, about his excellent interpretation, concerns a light lack of youthfulness in his timbre and in some minor non-Italian inflections in his pronunciation. Anyway, he sings very well and he vividly renders the prompt and smart personality of Belfiore.

Fiorenza Cossotto (b. 1936) is an astonishing Marchesa del Poggio. She drives her sentimental and psychological duel with Cavaliere Belfiore with convincing artistry and technique.

Vincente Sardinero (1937-2002) gives his voice to Gasparo Antonio La Rocca (the Treasurer). His "duel" duet with the Barone di Kelbar is simply exhilarating.
Sardinero's excellent technique and Italian pronunciation, joined to his intelligent interpretation and to his not so beautiful timbre, are exactly what needed, in this "Buffo" role, to perfectly render the vivacious character of the greedy, not young, Treasurer.

The Barone di Kelbar is none other than the wonderful Wladimiro Ganzarolli (1932-2010), here called to cover the other "Buffo" role. Ganzarolli excellently depicts and sings a sanguine and exuberant Kelbar. He perfectly interacts with Sardinero in their comic scenes.

William Elvin (Delmonte and Servo) and Ricardo Cassinelli (Conte di Ivrea) complete, far more than adequately, in their minor roles, the excellent cast.

Lamberto Gardelli (1915-1998) possibly was the best specialist of "minor" Verdi and, obviously, he masters the idiom. His orchestration and conducting are quite perfect, warm and vivid. Paces are very well chosen, conveying the needed brio, without fastening too much the tempos, which, in Verdi, is always dangerous, risking to transform operas into operettas, in particular where metre is triple.

The Royal Philharmonic Orchestra is involved and accurate and it perfectly supports Gardelli's interpretation.

The Ambrosian Singers and John McCarthy (1919-2009) are, as always, simply perfect.

Richard Nunn (1937-2012) is an expert harpsichordist.

Sound (stereo-analogic) is very good, warm and detailed. Some tridimensional effects (variations in the distance of the voices) are, in my opinion, sometimes a bit too forced.

The booklet contains a synopsis in English, French and German, while the Italian libretto is translated only in English.
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