Watch now

Verdi: Stiffelio [Parma 2... has been added to your Basket
Quantity:1

Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon

Image Unavailable

Image not available for
Colour:
  • Verdi: Stiffelio [Parma 2012] [Aronica, Guanqun, Frontali, Mangione]  [C Major: 723104] [Blu-ray] [2013]
  • Sorry, this item is not available in
  • Image not available
      

Verdi: Stiffelio [Parma 2012] [Aronica, Guanqun, Frontali, Mangione] [C Major: 723104] [Blu-ray] [2013]


Price: £28.12 & FREE Delivery in the UK. Details
Only 4 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
3 new from £24.89 3 used from £34.88
£28.12 & FREE Delivery in the UK. Details Only 4 left in stock (more on the way). Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.

Special Offers and Product Promotions

  • Enjoy £1 credit to spend on movies or TV on Amazon Instant Video when you purchase a DVD or Blu-ray offered by Amazon.co.uk. A maximum of 1 credit per customer applies. UK customers only. Offer ends at 23:59 BST on Tues, June 30, 2015. Here's how (terms and conditions apply)
  • Check out big titles at small prices with our Chart Offers in DVD & Blu-ray. Find more great prices at our DVD and Blu-ray Bargains Store.
  • Note: Blu-ray discs are in a high definition format and need to be played on a Blu-ray player. To find out more about Blu-ray, visit our Hi-Def Learn & Shop store.

  • Important Information on Firmware Updates: Having trouble with your Blu-ray disc player? Will certain discs just not play? You may need to update the firmware inside your player. Click here to learn more.


Product details

  • Actors: Aronica, Guanqun, Frontali, Mangione, Orchestra E Coro Del Teatro Regio Di Parma
  • Format: Classical
  • Language: Italian
  • Subtitles: English, German, French, Spanish, Chinese, Korean, Japanese
  • Region: Region A/1 (Read more about DVD/Blu-ray formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 16:9 - 1.78:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Classification: Exempt
  • Studio: C Major
  • DVD Release Date: 8 April 2013
  • Run Time: 117 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B0094AH39I
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 132,568 in DVD & Blu-ray (See Top 100 in DVD & Blu-ray)

Reviews

Product Description

Andrea Battistoni leads the Orchestra and Chorus of Teatro Regio di Parma in this performance of Verdi's opera recorded live in 2012. Cast members include Roberto Aronica, Yu Guanqun, Roberto Frontali and Gabriele Mangione.

Review

The golden timbre of Roberto Aronica graces the title role… His commanding tenor makes one sit up and listen, with some notable long-breathed phrasing and a smooth legato a joy to hear. --Mark Pullinger, International Record Review --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5 stars
5 star
2
4 star
0
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See both customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Noam Eitan on 1 Mar. 2013
Format: Blu-ray
This opera closed the 2012 season in Parma. The dramaturgy and the musical aspects complement each other and are of a high standard. The librettist set the drama in an imaginary Protestant sect, the "assasveriani", and religious Puritanism is constantly at the foreground. Francis Calcagnini's sets and costumes create a rigid, suffocating, monastic ambiance, with tall gray walls, no windows, and few exits. The approach is minimalist but expressive, with well-integrated abstract strictness. The stage floor is covered with biblical texts in Latin. It has a lot in common with the sets Es Devlin created for the 2009 Nederlandse Opera production of I Puritani (on blu-ray), for the same dramatic reasons (the sets there were also in gloomy gray, with a rigid geometric design, covered with the Bible in Braille). Both productions also share an obsession with books. Director (and light designer) Guy Montavon placed the action in the Amish community like in the movie "The Witness" with Harrison Ford. The chorus are all dressed in black and gray, you can hardly make them out individually. Raffaele, Lina's seducer, stands out as an outsider and a villain in an orange outfit. Lina is dressed in white only in the last scene, where she is solemnly forgiven. Chorus and singers are carefully arranged on stage. Their blocking, postures and interactions are methodically prepared for pinpoint dramatic effect and psychological insight. The community is a major protagonist, with heavy emphasis on ambiance (gloomy, oppressive, and claustrophobic). Lighting too is employed methodically in the service of the drama.

You need to watch this a few times to register all the details of Guy Montavon superlative work. The effect is cumulative.
Read more ›
5 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By H. A. Weedon TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 12 May 2014
Format: Blu-ray Verified Purchase
If you were to ask someone to name Verdi's six greatest operas it's unlikely that Siffelio would be among them. However, if this production, staged at Parma under the direction of Guy Montavon, is anything to go by, this work deserves to be numbered amongst Verdi's greatest. Apart from anything else, the work is a tribute to his versatility and, for once, here we have a work that doesn't end with someone getting stabbed to death, poisoned, committing suicide, dying of some awful disease and so on. Instead of anything like that, the work ends in a triumphant statement of forgiveness and reinstatement.

Through time several criticisms have been levelled at this work such as the reason for Lina's adultery not being established and so on. But do we need to know the reason? We are not reading a novel or a play. This is opera, a genre in which we can travel into a whole new world in which the emotions and experiences of life are enhanced through the medium of the music, the queen of the arts; and this is where Verdi triumphs. Through the genius of his music he interprets both precisely and realistically the emotional agony involved in the machinations of a love triangle. Here we have a well staged, perfectly presented and inspiringly sung work that lends itself to being watched over and over again without tiring the viewer-listener.

I was intrigued by Yu Guanqun's interpretation of the role of Lina, the adulterous wife of Stffelio the Christian minister. What is this glasses wearing, demur little clergyman's wife doing having an affair with a nobleman in the shape of Raffaele von Leuthold.? She is so right for the role and her singing and everything else she does could not be bettered. Gabriele Mangione does his adulterous nobleman part just right.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 4 reviews
7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
Guy Montavon's superb production 11 Mar. 2013
By Noam Eitan - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Blu-ray
This opera closed the 2012 season in Parma. The dramaturgy and the musical aspects complement each other and are of a high standard. The librettist set the drama in an imaginary Protestant sect, the "assasveriani", and religious Puritanism is constantly at the foreground. Francis Calcagnini's sets and costumes create a rigid, suffocating, monastic ambiance, with tall gray walls, no windows, and few exits. The approach is minimalist but expressive, with well-integrated abstract strictness. The stage floor is covered with biblical texts in Latin. It has a lot in common with the sets Es Devlin created for the 2009 Nederlandse Opera production of I Puritani (on blu-ray), for the same dramatic reasons (the sets there were also in gloomy gray, with a rigid geometric design, covered with the Bible in Braille). Both productions also share an obsession with books. Director (and light designer) Guy Montavon placed the action in the Amish community like in the movie "The Witness" with Harrison Ford. The chorus are all dressed in black and gray, you can hardly make them out individually. Raffaele, Lina's seducer, stands out as an outsider and a villain in an orange outfit. Lina is dressed in white only in the last scene, where she is solemnly forgiven. Chorus and singers are carefully arranged on stage. Their blocking, postures and interactions are methodically prepared for pinpoint dramatic effect and psychological insight. The community is a major protagonist, with heavy emphasis on ambiance (gloomy, oppressive, and claustrophobic). Lighting too is employed methodically in the service of the drama.

You need to watch this a few times to register all the details of Guy Montavon superlative work. The effect is cumulative. This is an unusual opera in many ways and shows Verdi's eagerness to experiment and break away from familiar patterns. In act II Stiffelio ascertains Lina's infidelity and the usual operatic spectacle ensues: wailing over the tarnished honor, threats of retribution, etc. He is about the kill her seducer. You expect a bloodbath in act III, or at least a murder or a suicide. Instead Stiffelio and his wife sit down to have an adult discussion and he offers her...a divorce! On first viewing I had a hard time connecting with the story, the whole thing felt a bit sterile, even though of a high esthetic caliber. But it all came together on repeat viewing. Under Guy Montavon direction the tension consistently builds up. I was absolutely immersed in the plot, the psychology of the protagonists and the clean, austere esthetics of the production (not to mention the music itself). The final scene in church is a real emotional climax. Stiffelio mounts the pulpit (here a symbolic one - a huge open Bible) and quotes from the story of the adulterous woman (John 7:53-8:11): "Let Him Who is Without Sin Cast the First Stone". Stones descend from the ceiling until they hang in midair over each parishioner. I had goose bumps when Stiffelio cries out "Perdonata...perdonata...perdonata."

All singers offer convincing performances in every sense. Tenor Roberto Aronica is a noble and emotionally mature Stiffelio, with a warm, well projected, thrilling voice. His timbre is a wonderful blend of a hint of a baritonal shade with warm head voice. He has enough stamina and style to shape long, Bellini-like phrases. Soprano Guanqun Yu (twenty-nine here) was able to project Lina's vulnerability, resolve and strong character and has a very sympathetic stage presence. She was able to express Lina's conflicts with an impressive economy of gestures and understatement. She is a full lyric with powerful emission in the middle and upper registers, sweet, plaintive timbre tinged with enough steel for the role's heavier demands and good agility. She recently made a very impressive Met debut as Leonora in Trovatore - her voice had no problem filling the house. The most experienced Verdian in the cast is baritone Roberto Frontali. He portrays a clearly fleshed out Stankar, with a large vocal range with rich shades, good soft singing, and expressive phrasing. He is the only one the audience rewards with mid-performance applause and cries for an encore. I heard him at the Met, in Madrid, Israel and Dresden and I don't think his colleagues here are any less deserving of a standing ovation, but he is the only one with a juicy, spectacular aria+cabaletta. Stiffelio and Lina do most of the heavy lifting in this opera, but where can you interrupt them with a standing ovation? The director had a problem with justifying Stankar's use of arms (as an Amish), so he had him bury his weapons and dig them out in act III. The Parma chorus prepared by Martino Faggiani is first rate as always. My first impression of twenty-five years old Andrea Battistoni's conducting was that he paced the work well but with little rubato, dynamic variation or give-and-take with the stage, but that this rigidity fit in with the other aspects of the production. On repeat viewing, the conducting is not intrusive or fussy, but it is prosaic (I compared it to my favorite Stiffelio, Nicola Luisotti's live performance from 2000 on Dynamic CD's). Battistoni doesn't know how to milk rhythmic and dynamic transitions for all their effect. Where more experienced conductors will do accelerandos with the rhythm accelerating exponentially (in a graph curved up), the energy building faster and faster, he accelerates in a linear curve. The downbeat doesn't "bounce" when it can, particularly in accented 6/8 (or 3/4), the Verdian oom-pah-pah. Accents are not emphatic enough. But it could all be worse.

Video direction by Tiziano Mancini is first-rate as always and video resolution is quite stunning on larger sets. Sound engineering of the stereo track is fantastic within the parameters of today's professional sound engineering (I don't have surround). I moved more detailed comments about the sound to the comments section.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
A difficult but rewrding opera served well. 10 Sept. 2013
By Dr. John W. Rippon - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Blu-ray Verified Purchase
This is a very difficult opera to evaluate. I've see it but once a long time ago. It was in a distinguished production. This present production is also a distinguished production but it is still a difficult opera to "get into". Though I do not like most minimalist attempts at opera, Guy Montavon's lighting, stage direction together with the sets and costumes of Francesco Caleagnini served the drama well. I especially appreciated the "stones" hanging over the congregation in the pardoning scene in the last act. It and the previous act were dramatically spell binding thanks to Verdi's music. But even on the third viewing I still do not know enough of the individual characters to connect them to their actions. I understand that the play has two more long acts and with all the twists and turns in the drama we may be able to "get into" the nuances of these complex characters. I just think in its present form it does not make good "opera". We need to know more of what motivates these people. Now the music is another matter. It is gorgeous! We are a long way from Nabucco (which I dearly love). but this is a deep psychological drama on a personal level. It is not the cardboard characters in crash-bang historical {hysterical) dramatic pageantry. It takes repeated listening but Verdi has provided the major players of this drama with musical signatures that help us understand the motivations to some extent but we really need to know more about each one. Raffaele is particularly an unknown quantity and yet he is so central to the plot. He was underserved by Gabriele Mangione. The Lina and Stiffelo were well sung but there were no sparks in their performances here. Unlike the grandiose Trovatore where I've seen Yu Guanqun wow the house nothing happened. This opera if it is going to succeed needs the dramatic acting given by Malfitano and Carreras. That holds for Roberto Aronica and his Stiffelio . He has a gifted voice; a good solid tenor up and down the scale with a baritonal undergirding.
The Verdi baritone stole the show as far as I'm concerned. Roberto Frontali has a house-filling voice of wide range and in full command. His suicide thoughts brought genuine tears to my eye. He can be a bit gruff but he is certainly a pleasure to listen to. And the audience at Parma thought so also.
As mentioned above, the staging was expertly done and helped to understand the morbid psychology of the community; this stultified, enclosed, sterile life of these religious extremists.
The orchestra played well and with religious fervor. The unrelenting regularity of the conducting fit well with the somber unremitting regularity of the ashen grey religious community. A part of the whole.
There is some exquisite passages of music in Verdi's Stiffelio although I don't think it will be in my list of favorites
3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
Great surprise! 2 July 2013
By Lukita - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Blu-ray
I just saw this Stiffelio production, part of my personal Verdi 2013 celebrations! What a great surprise! Small and pretty simple settings, but let's talk about the singing! Aronica sings the part beyond expectations with a dark voice sometimes which fits well for the troubled husband. Every now and then he sounded a little insecure but overall this was a superb performance! Guanqun Yu made the part looks easy with a very comfortable upper register! Fabulous! Roberto Frontali: amazing! I confess, it was the first time I heard the man but I'll will look for more! Great baritone tone, great upper notes! The chorus is spot on and gave me goose bumps in the final moments!
The orchestra sounds a bit crude at a times, but it was not distracting!
Great chance to watch this "lesser" work by Verdi!
2 of 4 people found the following review helpful
Verdi not served right. 8 July 2013
By dongiovanni - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Blu-ray
Sorry to disagree with previous reviewers. As much as I love the new TUTTO VERDI series with many magnificent performances I've seen so far, this one unfortunately misses the mark and misses badly.
As I was watching and listening I was really wondering if indeed this was written by the great Maestro. To my ears the music just did not come together, did not gel. The action on the stage felt artificial, `operatic' in the worst sense and unable to convey this gripping drama. If you don't believe me just follow the audience reaction: there was very little applause although the Parma audience is usually very enthusiastic.

The previous reviewers talk a lot about the work itself, the stage design and the director. But this obfuscates the picture. In opera the conducting is of paramount importance and young Battistoni, talented no doubt (he has given us a very enjoyable and competent Attila), but here unfortunately he hasn't got the grip of the score. He plays the notes correctly, but conducting Verdi, especially this unusual and unconventional Verdi, requires a conductor of more maturity. In comparison I refer the reader to the Covent Garden performance with Sir Edward Downes and listen to him conduct. You'll think it's an entirely different opera! In my opinion the chief problem here is the conductor.

Now for the singers and I'll only mention where I see particular weaknesses. Sign. Mangione (Raffaele)is an unlikely lover both in looks and acting. In the first act he seems like he would rather be somewhere else. Sign. Andguladze (Yorg, the old pastor), an important role and should have gravitas, seems far too young with ridiculous beard and concentrating too much to look bent with age,his basso voice lacking the power we've been accustomed to in this series (eg. Attila, I Lombardi, Nabucco etc.)

As for the principals I see no problem with their voices. Unfortunately or fortunately I have seen Jose Carreras who is light years above Sign. Aronica,both as a tenor and a dramatic actor. I am referring to the passion and sophistication Jose Carreras brought to the role. Signora Guanquin's is a fine soprano but her sense of identification with the role and her acting again bears no comparison to Catherina Malfitano. There is altogether too much crucifix gripping (oh what a cliché..) masquerading as acting in this production.
Were these reviews helpful? Let us know

Customer Discussions

This product's forum
Discussion Replies Latest Post
No discussions yet

Ask questions, Share opinions, Gain insight
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in
 

Search Customer Discussions
Search all Amazon discussions
   



Feedback