Watch now

Quantity:1

Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon

Image Unavailable

Image not available for
Colour:
  • Sorry, this item is not available in
  • Image not available
      

Verdi: I Masnadieri [Blu-ray] [2012]


Price: £28.12 & FREE Delivery in the UK. Details
In stock.
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
21 new from £17.12 2 used from £35.40

Looking for Bargains?
Check out the DVD & Blu-ray Deals of the Week page to find this week's price-drops. Deals of the Week end on Sunday at 23:59.

Special Offers and Product Promotions

  • Bag a bargain this holiday season from hundreds of top titles in our Christmas Deals Promotion. Offers end at 23:59 on Sunday, December 21. Find more great prices on DVD and Blu-ray Bargains.
  • Find the perfect gift for movie fans and telly addicts with our DVD & Blu-ray Christmas Gift Guide. From the biggest new blockbusters to festive favourites, there are plenty of present ideas for any budget.
  • Note: Blu-ray discs are in a high definition format and need to be played on a Blu-ray player. To find out more about Blu-ray, visit our Hi-Def Learn & Shop store.

  • Important Information on Firmware Updates: Having trouble with your Blu-ray disc player? Will certain discs just not play? You may need to update the firmware inside your player. Click here to learn more.


Frequently Bought Together

Verdi: I Masnadieri [Blu-ray] [2012] + Verdi: Alzira (Facini, Gazheli, von Bothmer, Saito Orchestra Haydn di Blozano e Trento, Gustav Kuhn) (C Major: 721504) [Blu-ray] [2012] + Verdi: Macbeth (Leo Nucci, Enrio Iori, Sylvie Valayre, Roberto Iuliano) (C Major: 722104) [Blu-ray] [2012]
Price For All Three: £88.10

Buy the selected items together

Product details

  • Actors: Giacomo Prestia, Aquiles Machado, Artur Rucinski, Lucrecia García, Nicola Luisotti
  • Format: Classical, Widescreen
  • Language: Italian
  • Subtitles: English, German, French, Spanish, Japanese, Chinese, Korean
  • Region: All Regions (Read more about DVD/Blu-ray formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 16:9 - 1.78:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Classification: Exempt
  • Studio: C Major
  • DVD Release Date: 11 Feb 2013
  • Run Time: 124 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B0094AH3NE
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 132,265 in DVD & Blu-ray (See Top 100 in DVD & Blu-ray)

Reviews

Product Description

C Major presents Verdis opera I masnadieri, as part of their Tutto Verdi project. This is a World première on DVD and Blu-ray. The opera is based on Die Räuber by Friedrich von Schiller. The story tells of how the actions of the jealous Francesco have separated his father from his brother Carlo.

Blu-ray
Picture: Full HD
Sound: DTS-HD MA 5.1, PCM 2.0
Running Time: 135 minutes
(Opera: 124 minutes, Bonus: 11 minutes)
Subtitles: Italian (original language), English, German, French, Spanish, Chinese, Korean, Japanese
Booklet: English, German, French

Review

Artur Rucinski's vocal performance is the most distinguished in this production… the promising Polish baritone has a juicy tone and invests his aria and cabaletta with feeling. --Mark Pullinger, International Record Review

Customer Reviews

3.8 out of 5 stars
5 star
0
4 star
3
3 star
1
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 4 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

13 of 13 people found the following review helpful By Noam Eitan on 11 Jan 2013
Format: Blu-ray
I Masnadieri was staged in San Carlo two years after the world premiere in London in 1849 for a run of 14 performances and never again until this production from March 2012. The opera was rarely performed until a successful concert performance by the Opera Orchestra of New York in 1975 and the issue of a Philips recording with Bergonzi, Caballé, Cappuccilli and Raimondi, conducted by Lamberto Gardelli. Bonynge conducted it at the Sydney Opera House in 1980 and recorded it for Decca in 1982 with his late wife.

According to the blu-ray's book this blu-ray was compiled from all 5 performances in the run. Nicola Luisotti was recently appointed music director of the Teatro San Carlo in Naples, and this production is the first he conducted since his appointment. Gabriele Lavia, a well-known Italian director of high repute, as well as an actor, directed it. He is considered a 'specialist' of Schiller's text "Die Räuber" on which the libretto is based - he directed it (and played the role of Carlo) in a successful 1982 production that toured several Italian towns, and has recently directed a group of young actors in another staging seen in several Italian theatres. He also recently directed this play in one of the major theatres in Rome. In 1986 he produced this opera in Pisa, Lucca and Livorno. So this production of the Teatro San Carlo has generated considerable interest and has attracted fans from all over Italy.

In this staging the entire opera takes place in a single ugly space, possibly an abandoned contemporary theater stage with exposed lighting apparatus, projectors everywhere, or a space in an urban ghetto in Harlem or the Bronx with a broken roof, scattered debris and dead leaves .
Read more ›
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By trottman on 4 Feb 2013
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
Together with Alzira there is a tendency to regard I Masnadieri as the bottom rung of the Verdi ladder but judging by this spirited production from Naples (2012) the opera does not deserve the unwarranted oblivion to which it has been consigned since first staged in London in 1847 for the musical content is certainly superior to the enjoyable but lightweight Un Giorno di Regno or the B side effort Il Corsaro. Much of the blame for the obscurity can be laid at the door of Andrea Maffei who penned a libretto containing vicious references that eclipse even those of Don Giovanni but which totally lack any of the brillance of Da Ponte. By even the most extreme operatic standard the opera's ending can only be described as absurd.

The plotline treads much familiar Verdi ground and concerns yet another unfortunate soprano at the centre of complex family intrigues including the composer's staples of warring brothers and older man/younger woman relationships (in this case uncle/niece rather than the normal father/daughter) Briefly the favourite son (Carlo) is in exile from the family. His cousin (Amalia) (also his love interest) is coveted by his brother (Francesco) the lovers' scheming nemises. A Verdi villain, with few if any redeeming features, Francesco, played as a crippled grotesque, tries to convince Amalia that both the father/uncle (Massimiliano) and Carlo, who is now the leader of a robber gang, are both dead. Eventually the very much alive Carlo is to enjoy a brief reunion with Amalia, who, grief stricken, he comes across wandering in the woods. Sometime later he discovers that his father is also still alive. Stricken with some form of remorse Francesco kills himelf which is the precursor for yet another death inspired by an oath given by Carlo to his robber band.
Read more ›
2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Keris Nine TOP 500 REVIEWER on 25 July 2013
Format: Blu-ray
Based on a work by Friedrich Schiller and composed just after his first attempt at adapting Shakespeare to the opera stage in Macbeth, I Masnadieri was another attempt by Verdi to put some literary weight behind his work. The work failed however to live up to its source and was not a success when it was first performed in London in 1847 with Verdi himself conducting. More conventionally structured than Macbeth, I Masnadieri is not the greatest Verdi by a long stretch and hasn't enjoyed the same popularity as its predecessor, but it's still Verdi all the same and with the right kind of production, even the composer's lesser works can be highly charged and thoroughly entertaining. That's certainly the case with this 2012 production of from the Teatro San Carlo in Naples.

It's true however that the work is initially constrained by its conventional structure. Each of the principal characters are introduced in the First Act with cavatinas that express their nature and their ambitions. The stagy conventionality of this introduction is matched by the apportioning of the roles according to type - the hero inevitably is a tenor, the love interest is a soprano, the villain is a baritone and the father is a bass. No surprises there. Having introduced the characters however, Verdi launches into the highly charged drama of the situation with his usual fiery arrangements which, if it has the right kind of treatment, can nonetheless be highly effective. The secret to making such material work of course - as is the case with all Verdi's early melodramas - is in the commitment and delivery of the performances.

A production of I Masnadieri stands or falls based on the performers, more so than the staging, but thankfully, the Naples production is strong in both areas.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 10 reviews
14 of 17 people found the following review helpful
Maestro Nicola Luisotti Saves This Sorry Production 2 Jan 2013
By Noam Eitan - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Blu-ray
I Masnadieri was staged in San Carlo two years after the world premiere in London in 1849 for a run of 14 performances and never again until this production from March 2012. The opera was rarely performed until a successful concert performance by the Opera Orchestra of New York in 1975 and the issue of a Philips recording with Bergonzi, Caballé, Cappuccilli and Raimondi, conducted by Lamberto Gardelli. Bonynge conducted it at the Sydney Opera House in 1980 and recorded it for Decca in 1982 with his late wife.

According to the blu-ray's book this blu-ray was compiled from all 5 performances in the run. Nicola Luisotti was recently appointed music director of the Teatro San Carlo in Naples, and this production is the first he conducted since his appointment. Gabriele Lavia, a well-known Italian director of high repute, as well as an actor, directed it. He is considered a 'specialist' of Schiller's text "Die Räuber" on which the libretto is based - he directed it (and played the role of Carlo) in a successful 1982 production that toured several Italian towns, and has recently directed a group of young actors in another staging seen in several Italian theatres. He also recently directed this play in one of the major theatres in Rome. In 1986 he produced this opera in Pisa, Lucca and Livorno. So this production of the Teatro San Carlo has generated considerable interest and has attracted fans from all over Italy.

In this staging the entire opera takes place in a single ugly space, possibly an abandoned contemporary theater stage with exposed lighting apparatus, projectors everywhere, or a space in an urban ghetto in Harlem or the Bronx with a broken roof, scattered debris and dead leaves . Colorful graffiti and murals ("city painting") "decorate" the brick walls; in the background is a large skull with the words "libertà o morte" spread out. The libretto needs all the help it can get but setting all the action in the same space doesn't clarify the story and is confusing. The ugly costumes are a puzzling hodgepodge. The principal characters are in late-nineteenth-century style; the all male chorus of the masnadieri is in some kind of gangsters' style with leather coats and hats in matching and mismatching styles - from cylinder to bowler hats; the guests of Francesco party in punk or in cheap party wigs and Halloween costumes. There is a jarring mismatch between the postmodern sets and costumes on the one hand, and the acting characterized by conventional melodramatic operatic poses on the other hand. It creats some risible dramatic situations. There is a pervasive poverty of ideas on how the characters should interact or how the chorus should move on stage. Relationships are not clarified. It looks like the director just threw in the towel on the stupid libretto. It is depressing to watch this unrelenting and baffling ugliness for two hours with no change of scenes (or to watch close-ups of the soprano's heavy perspiration).

The four principals and the choir respond better to the conductor than to the director. Tenor Aquiles Machado as Carlo has a true sense of the Verdi style. His delivery is incisive, involved, with emotions clearly projected and lines beautifully shaped and articulated. He is a lyric singing a dramatic role here, but everyone has been singing up a vocal fach for years now (a fach or two: I just learned that J. D. Florez is to take up Arnold in Guglielmo Tell! A tenore di grazia!). The role of Amalia was created for Jenny Lind, the Swedish dramatic coloratura soprano and was written to display her particular strengths. It therefore requires considerable coloratura agility, facility with the fioriture but also dramatic power of projection. Soprano Ana Lucrecia García has all of these in spades. She has a pretty stunning technical capability (trills are inconsistent, though) and a full, gorgeous tone. Verdi has a way of somehow "announcing" in the beginning of a singer's part the special challenge or requirement of a role. Here he put a few bars into Amalia's first appearance a quickly ascending scale that sounds completely out of context in that spot other than to immediately announce his expectations (or allow the soprano to immediately dazzle?). García executes it perfectly and effortlessly, touching each note (rather than just gliding over the notes as C. used to do...). This is a sign of things to come in the rest of García's elegant assumption of the role. She is still very young and has a way to go to acquire that artistic intelligence that goes with the individuality of expression of more experienced divas. No comments about the rest of the cast or the chorus.

This opera is like a bullet train: the score has no digressions or redundancies and the story, with its grimness and aggression once started, goes forward directly without hesitation to its absurd end. Nicola Luisotti captures this breathless pulse of the score with rhythmic vitality, dramatic vivacity, urgency of expression and superbly calculated rallentandos and rubatos in its more lyrical and introspective moments. The orchestra plays for him in a state of grace with clear sonorities and balance between various orchestral sections. Luisotti is the real star of this production.

Blu-ray technical quality is fine in terms of video quality and sound. The singers are body miked. I noticed that performances where the singers are body miked sound better on headphones. The advantage of good speakers over even the best headphones is the soundstage they provide, but body mics kill the soundstage anyway. Sound engineers deconstruct the sound to a gazillion tracks and reconstruct some artificial mix according to their skills, preferences and available time. With body mics the result is sterile. This is another example of the maxim that the more toys sound engineers have available to play with the worse the outcome. There are (for now) clips from the production on youtube. You can get a glimpse of the gorgeous interior of the recently renovated San Carlo during the credits.
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
The Good, The Bad & The Ugly 26 Feb 2013
By John G. Gleeson Sr. - Published on Amazon.com
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
There is a lot of "Good" in this performance of Verdi's 11th opera. Particularly of note is the singing of the lead singers, the chorus, and the orchestral work of the Teatro di San Carlo Orchestra under Maestro Niccola Luisotti. As to the particulars ...

Tenor Aquiles Machado does a fine job with the frequently demanding role of Carlo. While I prefer the vocal performance of Carlo Bergonzi on the Philips CD set (I think that Bergonzi was the top Verdi tenor of his time),I have enjoyed Machado's performance in a deleted TDK Rigoletto, and enjoyed this one enough to look forward to the C Major release of Forza, with Machado as Alvaro. His spinto voice is nearly perfect for the tenor roles that Verdi wrote during the galley years.

Soprano Lucrezi Garcia is a promising vocal talent who carries off the coloratura runs, trills and pianissimi quite well, although her physical size and near total lack of acting ability, are off putting. Her voice is evenly produced through her extended range with no signs of forcing, although there are some glottal attacks that her coach should address before they get too set in her technique.

Baritone Artur Rucinski was very effective as the evil Francesco, with dramatic skills that were quite effective (think "leer and sneer") His mid voice reminded me of someone who sang in the mid late 20th century, and I will have to play some CDs to get a more precise fix on that, but Piero Cappuccilli comes to mind.

Now for the "Bad": staging. I simply cannot figure out why modern stage directors do what they do. What possible value is there in mutilating a work that has been performed since 1847? Admittedly, Schiller's Die Rauber, which I have not read nor intend to, was a creation of the Romanticism of the 19th century, and given that Verdi created what Berger ("Verdi With A Vengeance") terms a "very disjointed work". But if the work is to be staged, rather than presented in concert, why not defer to the traditional, rather than produce an approach that intensifies the disjointed aspects of the opera as written?

In this disc, the robbers run around in costumes that are from several historical periods, brandishing firearms dating from WW I to the present ( with an appalling lack of safe handling practices: I'd hit the deck if someone pointed an automatic weapon at me with his finger on the trigger!!). Then, when Francesco kills himself, he uses a knife rather than a more effective pistol. So does Carlo when he offs Amalia! Go Figure!

Someone needs to get Ms. Garcia into a weight loss program. I know that I'm being "insensitive" (I am frequently) and non-PC (ditto!), but the dramatic "connection" between Carlo and Amalia suffers from the girth issue. It reminded me of a simpler time where operatic performances involved large people who stood in one place and did the park and bark thing. Good opera today has gotten past that stage (pun intended).

Finally, the "Ugly"; the set. A bunch of stage lights on poles, a backstage that had a skull (reminiscent of the "Punisher" T shirt my older son got for me to upgrade my wardrobe), an upholstered chair sitting by itself in the middle of the stage. The set said nothing and was a huge, ugly distraction!

Having noted all of the above, gentle reader, being the Verdiholic that I am, I would not want to be without this opera. I am one of those who believes that lesser Verdi trumps most anything else. The music and the singing here all are very, very good, and while I do like to listen to CDs (and do so a lot) I enjoy the visual experience more, even when it is less than what I might prefer. BTW, picture and sound are excellent, and the personal microphones, while evident, do not distract me much at all.

In sum, this is a less than perfect opera whose lack of perfection is intensified by set and staging. But it is Verdi, so what more can I say?
7 of 9 people found the following review helpful
Poor production of a poor opera 4 Feb 2013
By Cy Reese - Published on Amazon.com
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
A "poor" opera by Verdi? Yes, there are at least two examples of these: this one and "Alzira". Personally, I rate this one just slightly superior due to its rousing choral music. Indeed, the famous composer made liberal use of a male chorus as would be indicated by the title of the work - "The Bandits". Their best piece occurs in the third act when they proudly proclaim that as brigands they enjoy "stealing, killing, whoring, and fighting"; not exactly saccharine lyrics. The major problem with the opera is its libretto, which centers on the rivalry of two brothers for a woman and a title; it's the stuff for high drama but somehow leads to a totally improbable resolution. The "evil" brother commits suicide because the priest won't absolve him and the "good" brother kills the woman he loves so he can be true to the gang of bandits that he leads. The weakness of the opera is compounded by this production. Another reviewer, Noam Eitan, has written a marvelous critique with which I am almost totally in agreement, so I will not be redundant. I disagree with him on the merits of the lead tenor, Aquiles Machado. As a lyric tenor, he had no business tackling the role of Carlo, which calls for a dramatic and forceful, almost Wagnerian, performance; I found his voice unpleasant and despite the fact that he received warm applause from the audience at the Teatro San Carlo, when the cameras panned the audience at the end of the opera, I noticed that there were a considerable number of empty seats, so perhaps, others shared my perception. In the role of Amalia, his beloved, Lucrecia Garcia exhibits a beautiful soprano voice, however, I hope that her acting ability will improve with experience. Case in point: when she encounters the lover she thought dead and should be running into his arms, she sings, not to him, but to the audience! Machado embraces her but commits the same fault - is he looking at the prompter? Director? Conductor? Look into her eyes, for God's sake! Eitam's review does not mention Artur Rucinski, a phenomenal baritone who, as Francesco, the evil brother, delivered the best performance of all the actors/singers. Not only does he have a powerful vocal instrument, but his acting as a mentally and physically deformed individual is brilliant; he had to sing and emote while dragging around a right leg and foot that seems to be in a cast. This man should be phenomenal as "Rigoletto". Without him and the conductor, the production would merit even less than three stars. As regards the Unitel Classica Blu Ray version, be aware that even though it offers subtitle and audio options, you may have some difficulty finding the menu they appear on. Perhaps, the recording company will make the menu items easier to access in future editions of this disc.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
Good Music.......Bad Drama 3 May 2013
By Dr. John W. Rippon - Published on Amazon.com
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
Verdi's 11th opera should have been a rousing success. It was commissioned for a London opening, Queen Victoria was in attendance, a good cast had been obtained with super-star Jenny Lind as Amalia and Verdi himself was to conduct a quite competent orchestra at Her Majesty's Theatre 22 July 1847. The music he wrote was an advance over his former works such as the absence of the obligate opening chorus and the concertato finale. Here the main character Carlo and the chorus set the scene and start the drama in high gear. Queen Victoria was displeased, the audience loved Miss Lind but not the opera. Back in Italy the work received scant attention. It was considered shocking, terrifying; depicting men who as the Robber chorus says like "stealing, killing, whoring and fighting". Just the sort of vivid action plot Verdi would favor for most of his career and successfully. But what went wrong with I Masnadieri? The problem seems to lie in the play that was the opera's source.
Frederich Schiller is considered one of Germany's most significant man of letters, up there with his close friend and colleague Johann von Goethe. As a reaction to the literary age of enlightenment, the German era of Romanticism was being ushered in by these two and others. The younger Schiller's first work was "Die Rauber" cast as a "Sturm und Drang" (Storm and Stress) play depicting a terrifying picture of society. It is a rage against oppresive society that deprives the individual his right to make his life as he wishes and to think as he wishes. (The Count dismisses his elder son Carlo who then takes up with other suppressed rejects of nobility-run society) The problem is Schiller went too far. His individualism ended in fanatic idealism as he was wont to do in other of his works used by Verdi; Don Carlo, Kabale und Liebe (Luisa Miller), Giovanna D'arco and even Maria Stuarde of Donizetti and William Tell of Rossini. But in the later works Schiller handled it better. In this Schiller's first work some of the dramaturgy is not well handled. The taking of his own life by the younger brother Francesco in the last act is convenient but not motivated sufficiently. Just as the killing of Amalia by Carlo is simply nihilist and awkward. (Budden in his work on Verdi says she was not supposed to be killed).
The music as a whole is good solid Verdi. At places it is quite beautiful and foreshadows things to come. Some arias are quite spectacular in character devlopment. The stage production is a mess; total Eurotrash. Ignore it. The singers are excellent. The young Venezuelan soprano Lucrecia Garcia sings beautifully and is skilled in this demanding role. Aquiles Machado is also an excellent singer and did well in his long role. Both need to mature and stop looking at the director all the time and especially when they are making love to each other. She needs to lose weight and needs some vocal refining. All the other roles were well done. Nicola Luisotti had the orchestra, chorus and singers under tight control and all played very well. It all sounded so good but...... there's that cluttered mess on stage. Oh well, put the disc on to play and go dust the furniture.
Not convincing production 4 Aug 2014
By Peter - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Blu-ray
I Masnadieri was the first opera that Verdi composed for an opera house outside Italy, namely for Her Majesty's Theatre in London. The year was 1847. Jenny Lind, the Swedish "nightingale" sang the role of Amalia, and Verdi himself was conducting. Excellent premises, but the opera was not well received, either in London or in Rome, where it was performed in 1848. The misfortune of this opera seems to contine. The present production is a co-production between Teatro San Carlo in Napoli, and Teatro La Fenice in Venice. This is the first opera in the collection which has some kind of "modern" setting, featuring grafitti, uniforms and machine guns. This itself is not the problem, but the singers - although they have fine voices - seem uninspired, and one never gets involved in, or touched by this performance. I suppose that the stage director, Gabriele Lavia, is the one to blame, but admittedly this is not one of Verdi's strongest operas. The librettist Andrea Maffei may not have inspired Verdi enough, and Verdi never used him again. I believe that this is the only available video recording. I have never seen or heard the opera before. The picture is fine and clear, but the sound is a bit anaemic.
Were these reviews helpful? Let us know

Customer Discussions

This product's forum
Discussion Replies Latest Post
No discussions yet

Ask questions, Share opinions, Gain insight
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in
 

Search Customer Discussions
Search all Amazon discussions
   



Feedback