Various Pets Alive and Dead and over 2 million other books are available for Amazon Kindle . Learn more
  • RRP: £7.99
  • You Save: £1.25 (16%)
FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £10.
In stock.
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon.
Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
Various Pets Alive and De... has been added to your Basket
FREE Delivery on orders over £10.
Used: Very Good | Details
Sold by the book house
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: This item will be picked, packed and shipped by Amazon and is eligible for free delivery within the UK
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Various Pets Alive and Dead Paperback – 28 Feb 2013


See all 9 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
£6.74
£3.74 £0.01

Trade In Promotion


Frequently Bought Together

Various Pets Alive and Dead + We Are All Made of Glue + Two Caravans
Price For All Three: £20.22

Buy the selected items together


Product details

  • Paperback: 384 pages
  • Publisher: Penguin; 1st. New Edition edition (28 Feb. 2013)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0141044942
  • ISBN-13: 978-0141044941
  • Product Dimensions: 12.9 x 2.3 x 19.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (101 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 48,119 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Marina Lewycka was born in Kiel, Germany, after the war, and moved to England with her family when she was about a year old. Her first novel, A Short History of Tractors in Ukrainian, has sold more than a million copies in the UK alone and was shortlisted for the Orange Prize, longlisted for the Man Booker and won the Bollinger Everyman Prize for Comic Fiction and the Waverton Good Read Award. Her second novel, Two Caravans, was shortlisted for the Orwell Prize. A Short History of Tractors in Ukrainian, Two Caravans and Marina's third and fourth novels, We Are All Made of Glue and Various Pets Alive and Dead are all available in Penguin. Marina Lewycka lives in Sheffield.


Product Description

Review

Wonderfully funny . . . a dizzy, eye-watering treat . . . Lewycka is somewhere between Hilary Mantel in her satirical mode and Sue Townsend (Independent)

Thank heavens for Marina Lewycka whose Various Pets Alive and Dead me laugh at least once in every chapter . . . The warmth of its tone, its zest, its blend of quirky, humane comedy and intellectual seriousness make this a novel to treasure (New Statesman)

Not many authors could successfully mix lentils, bra-burning and free love with city traders, quantitative analysts and the mathematical calculations that supposedly make naked short selling, CDOs and subprime mortgages infallible. But Marina Lewycka is an exception . . . Never has reading about something serious been quite so much fun (Economist)

Lewycka treats her characters with real affection and combines the big themes and acutely-observed details with characteristic lightness of touch (Daily Mail)

An astute and hilarious take on modern values (Stylist)

Lewycka displays a similar mix of astringent humour and worldly humanism in her fourth novel as she did in her acclaimed debut . . . a funny, farcical novel (Metro)

[Lewycka is] a warm and humane writer . . . most affecting (Sunday Telegraph)

An affectionate picture of a free-thinking, beatnik lifestyle now regarded as batty, but which was underpinned by a real desire to change the world. We could all do with a bit more of that (The Herald)

Lewycka is a warm and humane writer (Guardian)

Marina Lewycka's latest novel is wonderfully funny with moments of pure farce in the best tradition of social satire . . . this inventive and witty book fizzes along from beginning to end (Daily Express)

Lewycka is not only witty but astute . . . it is a charming, beautifully observed novel, and those who label Lewycka a merely whimsical or quirky comic writer woefully underestimate her abilities (Independent on Sunday)

About the Author

Marina Lewycka was born in Kiel, Germany, after the war, grew up in England and lives in Sheffield. Her first novel, A Short History of Tractors in Ukrainian, was shortlisted for the Orange Prize, longlisted for the Man Booker and won the Bollinger Everyman Prize for Comic Fiction and the Waverton Good Read Award. Her second novel, Two Caravans, was shortlisted for the Orwell Prize. A Short History of Tractors in Ukrainian, Two Caravans and Marina's third novel, We Are All Made of Glue, are all available in Penguin.

Inside This Book (Learn More)
Browse and search another edition of this book.
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Excerpt | Back Cover
Search inside this book:

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

3.9 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

33 of 35 people found the following review helpful By Denise4891 TOP 100 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 29 Feb. 2012
Format: Paperback
I know Marina Lewycka's new releases are eagerly anticipated by a lot of people, so I'm pleased to report that this fan wasn't disappointed and found this latest one to be full of her trademark colourful characters and wonderfully witty observations.

Marcus and Doro are a couple of old hippies who lived the communal good life in the 1970s and tried to bring their children up to believe in their leftie wholegrain values. As is so often the way, however, their children Serge and Clara (named after revolutionaries) have rebelled against their parents and taken very conventional paths (City trader and primary school teacher respectively). There's a real sense of time and place about the description the lifestyle of Marcus and Doro's and their fellow commune-dwellers, from the swinging and banner waving of the 60s and 70s through to their support for the miner's strike in the 80s, mixing their own brand of leftie intellectual politics with the rough and ready survival philosophy of the locals. It's all observed in a very nostalgic, affectionate manner with only the very slightest hint of gentle mockery. Indeed, when one of his fellow commune kids (now an IT whizz) admits that he envies their parents for at least believing in something, Serge (the City trader) jokes "I know, values and stuff. It all seems a bit retro".

The more contemporary storyline is played out against the background of the financial crisis of 2008 with banks collapsing, share prices falling through the floor and, of course, the demise of Woolworths. Serge is in the thick of it, while Clara's troubles are closer to home as she battles to educate the children (and parents) of a Doncaster council estate.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
54 of 58 people found the following review helpful By Veronica Guy on 2 Mar. 2012
Format: Paperback
Marina Lewycka has a wonderful and delicious way of seeing and hearing the world and people around her. Then she writes her story with the type of humour and situational placements that embellish storytelling so well.

I read this book as soon as I could and was as delighted as with her first book which entranced me. She is at the top of her form in this quirky and wonderful novel about idealistic naivete of the 'flower power' days and life in the harsh economic reality of today.

She runs the stories of two generations side by side and both dip into each other. I am old enough to recognise the parents in this book with wry humour and am insulted with Doro at being called an attractive woman 'for your age'. Lewycka draws on her considerable talent to clearly describe the confusion of political ideals and communal living styles that abounded in the 60s and 70s and embodied by the twenty somethings while bringing up their children to be non materialistic.

Of course, those children grew up into their own political and financial reality and looked at their anachronistic parents with fondness and a little embarrassment, but that does happen with every generation. It is just that Lewycka is so very good at juxtaposing these things and showing us a well drawn perception that has all her characters leaping off the page at the reader.

She deals with social tension extraordinarily well and can bring everything crashing down with humorous slapstick. A treasure of a book.

Thoroughly recommended.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By P. Haynes on 20 April 2013
Format: Paperback
I've read and enjoyed Lewycka's previous books and was really looking forward to this one, but it doesn't quite deliver. It's still a good read and I would recommend it, but I found the ending rather unsatisfactory, and it left me feeling vaguely like I'd been mislead and then let down.

The good news is that Lewycka has improved tremendously as a writer. Her style is easy to read without being simple, she writes convincingly about things that you are pretty sure she can't really know THAT much about, and she knows how to tell a story so that you want to keep turning the pages.

And, for most of the time, this book doesn't disappoint. It is written in three intertwining threads, from the points of view of three different characters - a mother and her son and daughter. And this is very well done, with just enough left unexplained, but, at the same time, little nuggets of explanation scattered just often enough to keep you turning the pages.

In this way the story progresses nicely, both amusing you and keeping you interested, as the pace and complexity gradually builds up to (hopefully) a climax. Except that it doesn't. And this is the real disappointment with this book. There is an ending, a bringing together of threads, of sorts, but it left me both confused about what exactly had happened (and why!) and feeling unsatisfied that I'd lived with that story for so long, only to find some of my questions still unanswered.

She also includes a sort of epilogue, written from the perspective of a fourth character (the father/husband) who has only appeared on the periphery of the story until then.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Look for similar items by category


Feedback