Buy Used
£2.95
+ £2.80 UK delivery
Used: Good | Details
Sold by owlsmart_usa
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Good clean copy with no missing pages might be an ex library copy; may contain marginal notes and or highlighting
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Vanity Fair (Penguin Classics) Mass Market Paperback – 30 Aug 2001

4.8 out of 5 stars 5 customer reviews

See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Library Binding
"Please retry"
£2.27
Mass Market Paperback
"Please retry"
£35.60 £2.95

Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone

To get the free app, enter your e-mail address or mobile phone number.




Product details

  • Mass Market Paperback: 912 pages
  • Publisher: Penguin Books Ltd; New edition edition (30 Aug. 2001)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0140437533
  • ISBN-13: 978-0140437539
  • Product Dimensions: 13.4 x 3.8 x 19.4 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 766,595 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

About the Author

William Makepeace Thackeray (1811-1863) born and educated to be a gentleman but gambled away much of his fortune while at Cambridge. He then trained as a lawyer before turning to journalism. He was a regular contributor to periodicals and magazines and 'Vanity Fair' was serialised in Punch in 1847-8. His other novels include 'The Luck of Barry Lyndon' and 'The History of Henry Esmond. John Carey is Professor of English at Oxford University. He has written on Dickens and Thackeray.


Inside This Book

(Learn More)
First Sentence
As the Manager of the Performance sits before the curtain on the boards, and, looks into the Fair, a feeling of profound melancholy comes over him in his survey of the bustling place. Read the first page
Explore More
Concordance
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index | Back Cover
Search inside this book:

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5 stars
5 star
4
4 star
1
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 5 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Mass Market Paperback
VF is a truly refreshing classic work- a sly insight into the selfishness of high pre-Victorian society that is written in such a straight forward manner by Thackeray. If Austen et al's squemishness at describing immorality or anything like action is a turn off for you when you read Regency novels then Thackeray will be an ideal antidote. There is also a very devious, dry sense of humour behind Thackeray's words which, if too subtle to make you laugh, will at least put a smile on your face.
It is difficult to be totally against Becky's attempts to rise to the top. Her plight to shake off the hinderences birth in a such a society can be much more sympathised with to the modern reader than the Victorian one. Similarly the angelicness of Amelia can become annoying at times- to readers 150 years ago, however, she would have been an ideal woman. These differences make for very interesting speculations on how opinions have changed over time making VF just as an important read as it was when written.
A louder, brasher classic with the rare charm of humour. A long read but well worth it. Highly recomended.
Comment 2 of 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Thackeray's subtitle to his most famous and enduring book, 'a novel without a hero' is, I think, a little disingenuous. Still, no matter, it's a great read. Described as a 'panoramic portrait' of Regency-era England, in the broadest sense of that latter term, we follow the fortunes of a numerous interconnected cast, the principle loci of which are the meek Amelia Sedley and the adventuress Rebecca Sharp.

As these two emerge from Miss Pinkerton's Academy for Young Ladies, and make their ways in the world, we subsequently encounter a large number of colourful characters, most of whose fortunes are destined to rise and fall in numerous intriguing ways across the more than 700 pages of this picaresque novel. Thackeray considered himself more of a realist and less of a sentimentalist than Dickens. Whether you'd agree with such an analysis or not I leave to your judgement.

The book itself, like much of Dickens work, originally appeared in serial instalments. This results in a long tale made up of satisfyingly small and palatable chapters, a veritable literary banquet of sixty-seven courses. I found it utterly compelling, and, despite rather too much life and work intervening, was nonetheless able to read the whole thing in about a week. I enjoyed it so much I plan to listen to it as an audiobook and watch the more recent BBC adaptation of it to.

Thackeray writes very well, choosing to frequently address the reader directly, and portraying the tale as if it were a real story that he himself picked up in his travels (I plan to enjoy finding out if there's anything to this idea other than a nice authorial conceit).
Read more ›
Comment 1 of 1 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I read this well known book and really enjoyed it. It is both cynical and realistic as well as been quite funny in places. It is a great look into the world of the early 1800's. People, though, people are the same. Some of the words are difficult and of the time and no longer in use but very often you can check them on your Kindle app without too much effort. It is sometimes hard to follow all the names he throws in but if you stick with the main characters you will keep the thread of the story.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I'm reading this for the third time and it's just as enjoyable as the first. In fact more so. Not only is it Georgian Engl;and brought to vivid life, it is so amusing. The characters are so well drawn, we all know a 'Dobbin' or a 'Becky Sharp'. I never though Dickens could be bettered but this is funny, tragic and instuctive all at once.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
A beautiful page-turner.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse


Feedback