Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Vanessa Bell Paperback – 15 Nov 2006

5 out of 5 stars 5 customer reviews

See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Paperback, 15 Nov 2006
£64.04 £16.13

Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone

To get the free app, enter your e-mail address or mobile phone number.




Product details

  • Paperback: 320 pages
  • Publisher: The History Press (15 Nov. 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0752440330
  • ISBN-13: 978-0752440330
  • Product Dimensions: 15.2 x 2.8 x 22.9 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,330,078 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, and more.

Product Description

Review

'Vanessa Bell emerges from Frances Spalding's sensitive and scholarly biography as an unexpectedly formidable figure...the central portrait is full and generous and it rings wonderfully true' --
The Times

'a compelling life, one worth telling, unusual in its social and intellectual contrasts, formidable in its cast of characters, poignant in its alternations of happiness and despair' --
Spectator

'an excellent biography: it could hardly be bettered... she has brought Vanessa Bell back to life...As a chronicle of human entanglements, and of the ways in which they were resolved, it will have an enduring fascination...Vanessa Bell adds a new and indispensable dimension to our knowledge of Bloomsbury, and it is very much to be welcomed.' --
John Russell, Times Literary Supplement --This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

About the Author

Frances Spalding read art history at the University of Nottingham and lectured on the subject for ten years before becoming a freelance art historian and biographer. She is currently editor of the Charleston Magazine.


Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5 stars
5 star
5
4 star
0
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 5 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
Vanessa Bell was a talented artist and a key figure in the development of modernist painting and, like her sister, Virginia Woolf, she played a central part in the formation and continuance of the Bloomsbury Group. In this excellent biography, Frances Spalding has revealed just how important and considerable Vanessa Bell's role was within that group, for although she was neither a writer nor an intellectual, she provided the integrity and stability that was needed in this set of talented writers, artists and thinkers.

Vanessa Bell was born Vanessa Stephen in 1879, eldest daughter of Leslie Stephen, editor of the Dictionary of National Biography and his second wife, Julia Duckworth. She was one of the four children Leslie and Julia had together, with two younger brothers and a sister, Virginia, who later became the writer and diarist, Virginia Woolf. Vanessa's early life was the privileged, but very restricted life of a child brought up in late Victorian England, however after the death of her parents, Vanessa moved to Bloomsbury with her brothers and sister and threw off the constraints of her upbringing. As the wife of Clive Bell she gave birth to two sons: Julian and Quentin; as the close friend (and the one-time lover) of Roger Fry, she was involved with bringing the first, radical Post-Impressionist Art Exhibition to London in 1910; as the lover of the painter Duncan Grant, she had one daughter: Angelica (some achievement in itself as Grant was a confirmed homosexual). As an artist, Vanessa Bell played an important part within the history of English art for the first thirty years of the twentieth century and she played a less significant, but none the less distinguished role as a colourist for the rest of her life.
Read more ›
Comment 8 of 9 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
Frances Spalding has done an excellent job on Vanessa Bell, a very important woman artist and far more than just the wife of Clive Bell as suggested in the Amazon description of the book. Spalding is also very honest about the aspects of the Bloomsbury set that make one boil with rage.
Comment 20 of 23 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
The best biography ever written on the painter Vanessa Bell. It gives an in depth insight into the social developments that influenced her work and paints a very intimate portrait of her personal life. Superb.
Comment 2 of 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
If interested in the Bloomsbury Group, you will enjoy this book, very well written, and thanks to letters and diaries available , Frances Spalding conveys to the reader exactly how Vanessa Bell felt and dealt with all the varied emotional issues during her life, an interesting and very enjoyable read
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Very authoritative, detailed and well-written. All illustrations and photo's are in black and white, but not a problem for me as I have other art books on Bell's work
Comment 0 of 1 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse


Feedback