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Vagabonds Of The Western World
 
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Vagabonds Of The Western World

21 May 1991 | Format: MP3

£5.99 (VAT included if applicable)
Buy the CD album for £7.90 and get the MP3 version for FREE. Does not apply to gift orders.
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Song Title
Time
Popularity  
30
1
4:54
30
2
6:10
30
3
5:16
30
4
5:14
30
5
4:48
30
6
5:16
30
7
3:30
30
8
5:13
30
9
5:46
30
10
3:26
30
11
3:52
30
12
4:25
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Product details

  • Original Release Date: 1 Jan. 1991
  • Release Date: 21 May 1991
  • Label: Decca Music Group Ltd.
  • Copyright: (C) 1991 Decca Music Group Limited
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 57:50
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B001S1ZTJW
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (17 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 51,803 in Albums (See Top 100 in Albums)

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Mr. Philip Baird on 24 Oct. 2010
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
My personal favourite of all the Lizzy recordings successfully blends Phil's early foray into folk myth and lyricism with Eric Bell's stinging stratocaster, Brian Downey's superb drumming (he's vastly under-rated) and of course Phil's playboy gypsy swagger and wonderful Rickenbacker tone and inventiveness. Their early promise was fulfilled on 'Vagabonds' before they went off in a new direction to mega stardom.

Although you can't help loving everything the great Phil Lynott did, I feel Thin Lizzy lost an essential element of their sound and appeal when they adopted the twin guitar line-up that took them to a wider audience. Perhaps Lynott couldn't afford to be so indulgent again; once he found the formula - he stuck to it, and you can't argue with that. I suspect too that he could exert more control over the band once Eric Bell left, as although he was and is a fabulous and inspired player, you always get the sense with Eric that he needed reining in. When he keeps his playing tight and concise, as he mostly does on this album, he is a beautifully gifted player with a touch and feel like Clapton's, and his contribution to the success of this record is as great as Lynott's.

Of the tracks on the original album, perhaps the opening Mama Nature Said sounds the most dated and it was always perhaps the weakest inclusion; but it's held up by what comes after. I always loved The Hero and the Madman, and although Tolkienesque wizardry and quest legend usually leave me cold; the inventive telling, playing and structure of the track really shines. There is some lovely bass playing and drumming and the outro solo by Eric is breathtaking in its attack and lyricism; perfectly complimenting and rounding out Lynott's wholly original composition.
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59 of 62 people found the following review helpful By Mark Barry HALL OF FAMETOP 50 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 21 Oct. 2010
Format: Audio CD
To my knowledge this troubled 'DELUXE EDITION' on Decca 984 194-9 (Barcode 602498419496) has had no less than 7 release dates - May, July and November of 2007 were first cited, then January, February and April of 2008 - and now it finally arrives Monday 18 October 2010 without the tiniest bit of fanfare. It has a 2007 Copyright date on the rear so it's effectively been delayed three and a half years. But has it been worth the wait - yes absolutely. But to the considerable details first...

Disc 1 (77:52 minutes):
1. Mama Nature Said
2. The Hero And The Madman
3. Slow Blues
4. The Rocker
5. Vagabond Of The Western World
6. Little Girl In Bloom
7. Gonna Creep Up On You
8. A Song For While I'm Away
Tracks 1 to 8 are their 3rd album "Vagabonds Of The Western World" released 21 September 1973 in the UK on Decca SKL 5170.
(It was released as London XPS 636 in the USA, but contained a very-slightly edited version of "Little Girl In Bloom"; it's the full UK version that is used here)

Tracks 9 and 10 are their 2nd UK 7" single from May 1973, "Randolph's Tango" and "Broken Dreams". Both tracks on Decca F 13402 were non-album at the time.
(Note: the version of "Randolph's Tango" that is used here is known as the 'Full Version' at 3:49 minutes - the promo-only 7" edit at 2:25 minutes is Track 17)

Tracks 11 and 12 are their 3rd UK 7" single and the first to feature a track off the album. "The Rocker" was issued as a 7" single in the UK in November 1973 on Decca F 13467 and is an edited version (2:41 as opposed to the album's 5:12 minutes). It was backed with another non-album Phil Lynott track, the jaunty "Here I Go Again".

Track 13, "Cruising In The Lizzymobile" is non-album also.
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18 of 19 people found the following review helpful By MJ Lowe on 8 Sept. 2006
Format: Audio CD
It would be wrong to call this album a departure from the traditional Thin Lizzy sound as it preceeds most of their major hits but "The Rocker" apart it's not the same sound. It's more Bluesey and less cocky and of course they were a three piece at the time. That's not to say it doesn't work. Far from it. It's an excellent listen from start to finish and a worthy effort for a band so early into a career who were under pressure to come up a with album they could shift. At this period Lizzy were struggling to pay the bills but rather than rush an album out like they did with "Shades of a Blue Orphanage" they took their time over this one and it shows. It has a lovely mix of songs and on the two ballads ("Slow Blues" and the stunning "Little Girl In Bloom") you can see where future anthems like "Dancing In The Moonlight" were first concieved. There's Plenty of decent rock-outs as well notably "Mama Nature Said" (was this the first rock band writing about the environment?), "The Rocker" and "The Hero and The Madman". The albums title track has an amazing mix of rock and the band's Irish roots (dare you to listen and not fancy a pint of the black stuff halfway through!!) which is truly inventive.

In summary it's a top bit of work with a mixed pace of sounds that plays well all the way through. Lizzy fans will love it and people that have heard of them probably will too.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Dash Riprock on 14 Dec. 2011
Format: Audio CD
Thin Lizzy's third album, and the final one for Eric Bell who decided he'd had enough on the road at the end of 1973, and quit the band. Vagabonds remains a fine showcase of the 3 piece's talents - whilst we all reverently remember Phil Lynott's superb songwriting and fantastic vocals and showmanship, we should never overlook Brian Downey's rock solid drumming and Eric's outstandingly inventive lead guitar. There's a fair variety of early Lizzy on display, with special mentions going to rock out opener Mama Nature Said and the sinuous Slow Blues, and A Song for Whilst I'm Away and Little Girl in Bloom are lighter but notable interludes. But the real highlights are the tracks in which Eric really does let rip in his inimitable way: Whisky in the Jar probably needs no further recommendation - here in full length version - but Eric's outro solo on The Hero and the Madman is the album's real summit: true, you have to sit through some lengthy cod-fantasy meanderings from our Phil, and a Spinal Tap style voice over from Kid Jensen, but it's worth it all for Eric's scorching fretwork at the end - arguably his greatest studio solo in my view. Things changed a lot for Lizzy with the advent of Gorham and Robertson, not least hitting the big time - but this album is a lasting tribute to an outstanding, if short lived, trio.
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