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Us and Them?: The Dangerous Politics of Immigration Control Hardcover – 21 Mar 2013

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Us and Them?: The Dangerous Politics of Immigration Control + The Price of Rights: Regulating International Labor Migration + Who Needs Migrant Workers?: Labour shortages, immigration, and public policy
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Product details

  • Hardcover: 224 pages
  • Publisher: OUP Oxford (21 Mar. 2013)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0199691592
  • ISBN-13: 978-0199691593
  • Product Dimensions: 23.6 x 2 x 16.3 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 922,883 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

More About the Author

Bridget Anderson is Professor of Migration and Citizenship at the University of Oxford and Deputy Director at the Centre on Migration, Policy and Society (COMPAS). She is particularly interested in citizenship, immigration enforcement (including human trafficking), and in low-wage labour, migration and the state. She has worked closely with migrants' organisations, trades unions and legal practitioners at local, national and international level.

Product Description

Review

Enlightening (Zoe Williams, The Guardian)

This tightly argued indictment of British policies and the selfproclaimed liberal states illiberal Us vs. Them juxtaposition in law, data collection and discourse should be required reading for political scientists. (Dirk Hoerder, Sozial.Geschichte Online)

The book leaves anyone interested in justifications of eligibility in social policies motivated to maintain a critical debate about the very foundations of often taken-for-granted assumptions about deservingness, as well as the global and national distribution effects of particular exclusionary policy choices with regard to individual groups' rights, life chances and livelihoods. It certainly teaches us not to hide behind legal catagories and statuses or formal decision-making procedures in our analyses of policies and politics. (Regine Paul, Journal of Social Policy)

About the Author

Bridget Anderson's research interests include low waged labour migration, deportation, legal status, and citizenship. Publications include Doing the Dirty Work? The Global Politics of Domestic Labour (Zed Books 2000) and Who Needs Migrant Workers? Labour Shortages, Immigration and Public Policy (OUP 2010), co-edited with Martin Ruhs. She has worked with a wide range of national and international NGOs including the Trades Union Congress, the Organisation for Security and Co-operation in Europe, and the International Labour Organisation. She is Deputy Director and Senior Research Fellow at the Centre on Migration, Policy and Society (COMPAS) at Oxford University.

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover
A very engaging book that situates the analysis of immigration controls within broader discussions of race, class and citizenship, yet remains accessible to the lay reader. Most refreshingly, the book highlights the connections between the criteria for formal exclusion of immigrants, and the criteria for informal, everyday exclusion of certain "failed citizens" in public discourse: the drunk, the benefit scrounger, the teenage mum, and other folk devils. In this sense the book stimulates the reader to reflect on: who is us, and who is them?
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By mquintero on 18 Aug. 2013
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This book is a must for anyone interested in migration studies. It reads very well and is extremely interesting. I highly recommend it
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0 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Eustaquia on 3 Jan. 2015
Format: Hardcover
If you believe that "us vs. them" is a figment of people's imaginations. If you believe that we are all one and that citizens of European countries should not only implement, but also *pay* for a migration policy that leads to their becoming a minority in their own country in (tops) a couple of decades from now (in new births, not yet in total population). If you are willing to ignore the costs of diversity in terms of freedom of speech (restricted in order to not offend certain people, cf. the real world), democracy (people vote according to ethnicity, not ideas, cf. Lee Kwan Yew), meritocracy ("positive" discrimination policies that lead to qualified candidates being left aside because they have the wrong skin colour - cf. the real world), massive loss of trust and social capital in diverse societies (cf. Robert Putnam, E pluribus unum), decreasing willingness to finance welfare (cf. Alesina) and, ultimately, riots and war (name me a war going on right now that is not caused, mainly, by ethnic differences of some kind)... well, then this is your book.
However, and for the sake of fairness and clarity, it must be said that there truly is one class of people for whom diversity is, literally, enriching: those who work in the immigration and diversity scam (like Bridget Anderson, I guess). The more immigration and immigration-related problems there are, the more important they become as "experts" telling us how to solve our immigration problems (the answer is always the same, no need for experts: more immigration).
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