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New Urban Farmer Paperback – Illustrated, 5 Mar 2010


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Product details

  • Paperback: 208 pages
  • Publisher: Quadrille Publishing Ltd (5 Mar 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1844008177
  • ISBN-13: 978-1844008179
  • Product Dimensions: 17.2 x 2 x 24.3 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (148 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 269,203 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Product Description

Review

"Tells of the wonders of growing in the city, from spotting the first emerging asparagus to the war with snails at her allotment. There is plenty of gardening expertise to boot." --Metro London, 16th Feb 2010

"Growing your own food? Learn from Celia Brooks Brown's four years of trail and error. Part journal, part gardening, part recipe book." --Grand Designs Magazine, March 2010

"Organised by month...each section features a selection of tasty seasonal recipes. With great photography, it's ideal for beginners." --Amateur Gardening, 6th February 2010

"This is one of the most attractive cooking/gardening hybrids, beautifully designed with an engaging slightly scrapbook feel imparting a wealth of cooking and growing information."
--The Bookseller, 12th February 2010

"Growing your own has become ever so fashionable, but Celia Brooks-Brown goes beyond trend-seeking to provide an indispensable guide for wannabe kitchen gardeners"
--FOOD & TRAVEL APRIL 2010

Brilliantly engaging --BBC Good Homes, 1st June 2010

A beautiful book --The Times, 19th March 2010

About the Author

Celia Brooks Brown is an accomplished professional cook and respected food writer. Since April 2007, she has been writing about the day-to-day goings on at her north London allotment in her online blog for the Times Online. Overall the Times Online is estimated to reach over 23 million global visitors each month. Celia has made countless appearances on TV, starting with Vegging Out in 2001 and continuing with Saturday Kitchen, Market Kitchen, Great Food Live in the UK and The Vicky Gabereau Show in Canada. Celia also regularly conducts her Gastrotours, an insider's guide to the best secret foodie spots around London. Author Location: London

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Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By J. S. Hardman TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 18 July 2010
Format: Paperback Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
I like this book. It is not a serious self-sufficiency guide, nor a serious gardening book, but it doesn't claim to be either of those. This is one person's experience and advice re. growing food on an allotment, together with some recipes and some anecdotes. It's a book to dip into every couple of weeks to see what you might want to do at that time of year, in terms of sowing, harvesting and cooking. I haven't read it cover to cover yet, I am doing the regular dip into it, so will probably take the whole year to get through it, which is my practice with other more serious and more detailed gardening books that are divided into months or seasons. However, I have found New Urban Farmer easy to read and useful, despite its beginner level feel. I wouldn't say I have learned a lot from it (I have read many other gardening books and have been growing vegetables on and off for years), but have learned some bits - that you can eat the leaves of courgettes and cucumbers was news to me, but something I will try this summer.

As other reviewers have said, it has the feel of a coffee table book rather than something you keep in the shed or greenhouse, but despite that I do keep it in my practical book corner rather than anywhere near the proverbial coffee table. If you are serious about gardening this will definitely not be your only guide to the gardening year, it's not detailed enough for that, but it does have a fresh feel to it, which reflects the author's previous writing experience.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By T. Russell on 12 July 2010
Format: Paperback Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
We ordered this book as we are in the process of starting up an allotment and growing things in our back yard.
We found it all rather airy fairy.
There was some practical advice on the hows, whats, whens and whys, but it was all mixed in with anecdotes, recipes, arty pictures, etc that makes it seem a bit confused as to what it's purpose is.
It would make a good coffee-table book for wannabe own-growers, but I could not recommend it to anyone who was seriously considering growing their own as there are a plethora of much better books out there.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Sir Barnabas VINE VOICE on 21 Mar 2010
Format: Paperback Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
Apparently this is a "is part-journal, part-gardening manual and part-recipe book "; a fairly accurate description really. The book itself is nicely presented, with lots of uplifting allotment tales to inspire the budding gardener. The book itself is divided into the four seasons, with each season further divided into months or part-months and what jobs should be in the pipeline and what should be sown and harvested at that time of year. In addition to the gardening information there are a number of recipe ideas for your produce which is a nice touch.

As a keen amateur allotmenteer, there are a few problems with this book for me. There is no A-Z reference of veggies and herbs which can make it difficult to find information on specific plants, there is nothing on companion plants and information about crop rotation and composting is rather glossed over. Also, the glossy nature of the book means you're unlikely to want to take it up to the allotment or in the garden. If you want a more functional book that contains lots of practical information, an A-Z plant guide, as well as a gardening calendar, information on companion plants, composting and even has recipes, then you might want to consider Allotment Gardening: An Organic Guide for Beginners

Overall, nice book that would the probably make a nice gift for a beginner, but on it's own will probably prove insufficient.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Gabrielle O on 20 April 2010
Format: Paperback Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
I'm quite new to the wonderful world of vegetable growing and allotments, which is partly why I've bought so many books about the subject over the last few years! My husband despairs of my excessive book-buying habits, but I just haven't found a single book that has covered everything I've wanted to know...

While I don't think the 'New Urban Farmer' book is going to be that bible (it doesn't really cover everything comprehensively, especially in terms of techniques) it certainly has become my very favourite and most readable book about growing vegetables. Packed with useful tips that other books don't think to mention to the novice gardener - for instance, about things you might not know you can eat, like courgette flowers and flowering brassicas. I really love this book for its combination of inspirational style and useful tips and I would definitely recommend it to friends.

The content is ordered by month, and the book starts in March, which is the perfect starting point really because that's when everything is kicking off in the allotments. I like the wealth of colourful and appealing photographs throughout the book. I also like the approach that this book takes: it starts out with tips about what to do when (eg planting, harvesting, preparing etc), along with a useful table at the start of each month to use as a quick guide, and then moves into some recipes that are relevant to the fruit/vegetables you might be harvesting that month.

Based on the author's own experience of urban gardening, this book is obviously written with the reader firmly in mind, and will provide a wealth of useful insights and information to those who are relatively new to growing vegetables or who want to experiment with new vegetables.
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