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  • Up in Flames [VINYL]
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Up in Flames [VINYL] Import


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Product details

  • Vinyl (8 April 2003)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: Import
  • Label: Domino
  • ASIN: B00008OM3A
  • Other Editions: Audio CD  |  MP3 Download
  • Average Customer Review: 3.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (12 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,689,771 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Customer Reviews

3.6 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 27 April 2004
Format: Audio CD
Manitoba's 'Up in Flames' is a bold two fingers to the stale electronicascene and a glorious leap forward. Along with Four Tet's 'Rounds' it hasrekindled faith in the one-man-and-his-machine dynamic, dragging thelaptop boffin kicking and screaming out of the bedroom and into apsychedelic love-in free-for-all (metaphorically, anyway). A veritable oneman band, Canadian Dan Snaith has recorded his own 'Private PsychedelicReel' in a bombastic tour de force of 'live' drumming, spools of sax,treated vocal harmonies, wailing guitar solos, sitas and flutes. Asidesfrom the inevitable comparisons and accusations of plagiarism (early Lipsand Mercury Rev have been mentioned, as have MBV), you'll hear nothinglike it this year, from the kaleidoscopic party animal of 'Skunks', to thedrowsy hues of 'Jacknuggeted', and the David Axelrod-meets-Roni Size of'Twins'. Heartfelt and head-hammering at the same time, it's a raw,eccentric triumph.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Sick Mouthy VINE VOICE on 1 April 2003
Format: Audio CD
This is an extraordinary album!
I bought Manitoba's debut on the strength of Amazon recommending it to me after I rated Four Tet's 'Pause' highly, and to be honest I was underwhelmed. Sure, it was nice enough electronica, but it didn't have a great deal of spark, and it certainly didn't prepare me for this!
Canadian Dan Snaith has taken the best bits of everything that's ever been good ever and stuck them all together! I've not had such an overwhelming first-hearing reaction to a record as this since I was 17 and heard Orbital for the first time. I was squirming and jerking and smiling and laughing and dancing round the room within minutes.
Imagine, if you will (if you can), The Chemical Brothers mining the legacy of My Bloody Valentine, and downbeat electronica surrendering to Brian Wilson's brand of gorgeous woozy pop music, all rolled together into one cohesive and inspirational 40-minute package!
Big happy clattering drums rub up with multi-coloured guitars, spacey organs, glockenspiels (or xylophones, who knows?), occasional dreamy vocals, sliding clarinets, droning saxophones, all manner of gorgeous found-sound weirdness, beatific electronic passages and even the occasional frog.
I can't implore you enough to go out and buy this record - if you love music, and I mean REALLY LOVE MUSIC, then you ought to love this.
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By R. A. Langham on 5 April 2003
Format: Audio CD
I bought this on an impulse after some good reviews in the papers. Heralded as an 'everything bar the kitchen-sink' album that should appeal in equal measure to both indie and dance fans, it sounded right up my street.
On first listen, I was a little underwhelmed - there are a lot of summery melodies (birdsong even makes an appearance here and there, but it washed over me a little and it all seemed inconsequential.
However, after a couple more spins at the turntable, it started to grow on me and might now be reasonably filed alongside the likes of Air and Royksopp in the category marked 'dreamy, intelligent pop'. I can now see myself wheeling this album out quite a lot over the summer of 2003.
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By A Customer on 31 Mar. 2003
Format: Audio CD
Undeniably influenced by the likes of My Bloody Valentine and, most obviously, Spritualized (before they became bloated and pompous) this album could hardly be described as ground breaking. I'm tempted to suggest that the uninitiated would do better purchasing Lazer Guided Melodies but it would be churlish to dismiss a hugely inventive and enjoyable album purely because it is easy to draw comparisons. After all, who is doing anything truly unique at the moment?
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By C. W. Gramstadt on 24 April 2003
Format: Audio CD
Its clear that Daniel Snaith, aka Manitoba, has been digging out a lot of old “shoegazing” records from the early nineties since the laptop glitch-fest of debut “Stop breaking my heart”. There are elements of MBV’s sonic experimentalism with vocals pitched beneath a fuzz of hazy effects and even – whisper it – Chapterhouse whose under-cherished Blood Music lp succesfully exploited the genre’s potential for experimenting with electronic music in the persuit of creating an even denser wall of sound.
To be fair, Leaf Records has always had the tendency to drift away from the perceived boundaries of some of its contemporaries – but this was still a bit of a shock. The closest comparisons I can make is of the Boo Radleys’ Sice attempting to sing Radial Spangle songs under the direction of Four Tet. I realise that for some of you, that description means as much to you as a New Labour manifesto and is just as difficult to comprehend so perhaps I’ll cut to the chase:
Up In Flames is fine summer-music for the 21st century. Clever electronics underpin lovely hazy melodies throughout the album. It never strays far from this underexplored template but highlight tracks like “I’ve lived on a dirt-track all my life”, “Hendrix KO” and single “Jacknuggeted” exemplify that Snaith has stumbled across a winning formula. Of course the next album will be completely different, so seize the moment and invest in the aural equivalent of waking up at 6pm on a sunny day at a festival with the afternoon’s local cider adding to the blissul confusion. That’s meant to be a good thing!
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