Unruly Media and over 2 million other books are available for Amazon Kindle . Learn more
£16.99
FREE Delivery in the UK.
In stock.
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon.
Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
Unruly Media: YouTube, Mu... has been added to your Basket
Trade in your item
Get a £3.26
Gift Card.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 3 images

Unruly Media: YouTube, Music Video, and the New Digital Cinema Paperback – 1 Oct 2013


See all 3 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
£16.99
£13.59 £17.37
£16.99 FREE Delivery in the UK. In stock. Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.

Frequently Bought Together

Unruly Media: YouTube, Music Video, and the New Digital Cinema + Music Video and the Politics of Representation (Music and the Moving Image) + Experiencing Music Video: Aesthetics and Cultural Context
Price For All Three: £61.98

Buy the selected items together


Trade In this Item for up to £3.26
Trade in Unruly Media: YouTube, Music Video, and the New Digital Cinema for an Amazon Gift Card of up to £3.26, which you can then spend on millions of items across the site. Trade-in values may vary (terms apply). Learn more

Product details


More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, and more.

Product Description

Review

"Unruly Media is ambitious in scope yet is written with a lightness of touch. Vernallis guides us through music video, YouTube, and digital cinema, tackling the rewards and challenges of their mutually-influencing 'accelerated aesthetic'. An insightful and original study."--Caryl Flinn, Professor of Screen Arts and Cultures, University of Michigan "Carol Vernallis was already the best scholar of music video, and I've waited eagerly for this new book. In Unruly Media she offers a sharp, ground-breaking account of what happens when the boundaries between film, video and digital media are criss-crossed in a myriad of interesting ways."--Will Straw, Professor of Art History and Communication Studies, McGill University "Carol Vernallis's work on soundtracks in digital media seems to me the most exciting commentary on sound/image relationship since Michel Chion's Voice in Cinema. When I read one of Carol's virtuoso treatments of moment-to-moment musical shaping of image reception, I often feel that I have barely attended to sound components at all. Her jazzy prose has an exultant, frequently hallucinatory vividness that takes you all the way in to whatever experience she's describing. It is rare to find film (much less music video) criticism that delights and instructs, as Carol's does, in equal measure."--George Toles, University of Manitoba "Full of flair, unexpected twists and non-linear asides, Unruly Media resembles the unique flow of new audiovisual media, inviting the reader to assemble the parts herself and become part of this post-classical scholarship." --Twentieth Century Music"Carol's in-depth analysis of music-video culture and its fate is an eye-opening look into pop culture. It is an engrossing and thought-provoking read--worth checking out." - Jonas Akerlund, director of Spun, Small Apartments, Beyonce's "Haunted" and "Superpower," and Lady Gaga's "Paparazzi" and "Telephone." [T]he first study that views digital cinema, music video, and online media as genres deeply entwined with one another... opens up the possibilities for new research... deftly captures the aesthetic qualities of digital media at this particular moment." --Echo"

About the Author

Carol Vernallis teaches Media Studies at Stanford University. She is author of Experiencing Music Video: Aesthetics and Cultural Context (2004) and co-editor of The Oxford Handbook of New Audiovisual Aesthetics (2013) and The Oxford Handbook of Sound and Image in Digital Media (2013).

Inside This Book (Learn More)
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index
Search inside this book:

Customer Reviews

There are no customer reviews yet on Amazon.co.uk.
5 star
4 star
3 star
2 star
1 star

Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 4 reviews
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
Informative and Delightful 6 Jan. 2015
By Alan Finke - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Even for a non-academic like me, this book is a wonderful tour of the relationship of image and music ranging from music video to current cinema to YouTube to Bollywood. Carol Vernallis' multilayered descriptive writing style with its array of concrete examples is deep and insightful with many "Aha" moments.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
Five Stars 10 Sept. 2014
By eduardo - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
It's a essencial guide to understand the audiovisual production in the age of YouTube and even post-Youtube
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
a great read 3 Dec. 2014
By Andrew C - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
I liked it a lot - great read.
2 of 4 people found the following review helpful
I might have known things would be bad when the first sentence of the introduction contained both ... 12 July 2014
By Majel Connery - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This could be the most poorly-edited academic press book I have ever run across. I might have known things would be bad when the first sentence of the introduction contained both a word repetition and a misplaced period. ("I love the media swirl: its accelerating aesthetics. mingled media..." There are dozens of instances of repeated sentences (search for how many times Vernallis makes the claim that the "Evolution of Dance" dancer seems to be animated by "Mexican jumping beans" or that the parents from the "Charlie Bit My Finger" video must have "slipped him a mickey.") I even found one instance of an entire paragraph reproduced verbatim.

But the real trouble with this book isn't its dodgy editing. It's just a dull read with few genuine insights and zero theorization. Vernallis's main thesis is pretty self-evident, namely, that the boundaries between media (like cinema, like the sorts of videos that appear on YouTube) are bleeding into each other. That's the "unruly" part. Ultimately, the book provides an excellent sense of the kind of content Vernallis is consuming, but little in the way of what we ought to think about it.
Were these reviews helpful? Let us know


Feedback