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Unrepentant Geraldines CD+DVD


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Tori Amos introduces Midwinter Graces

Biography

Tori Amos has an extraordinary fan base. It’s not unusual to hear her listeners explain how a song changed their life, through its ability to alter perspective and heal. Or even that a song might have saved their life. Since the release of her debut Little Earthquakes 20 years ago in 1992, where she smashed apart boundaries with her piano rock and raw, confessional poetry, Amos continues ... Read more in Amazon's Tori Amos Store

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Frequently Bought Together

Unrepentant Geraldines + Gold Dust + Night of Hunters
Price For All Three: £47.56

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Product details

  • Audio CD (12 May 2014)
  • Number of Discs: 2
  • Format: CD+DVD
  • Label: Decca (UMO)
  • ASIN: B00IFFK5O8
  • Other Editions: Audio CD  |  Vinyl  |  MP3 Download
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (52 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 57,240 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Disc: 1
1. America
2. Trouble's Lament
3. Wild Way
4. Wedding Day
5. Weatherman
6. 16 Shades Of Blue
7. Maids Of Elfen-Mere
8. Promise - Tori Amos, Tash
9. Giant's Rolling Pin
10. Selkie
See all 15 tracks on this disc
Disc: 2
1. Trailer
2. Interview
3. Studio Tour
4. Album Photo Shoot

Product Description

Fourteenth studio album by the American singer/songwriter. The album features the single 'Trouble's Lament' and debuted at #13 in the UK Albums Chart. The deluxe edition includes a bonus DVD featuring a trailer, interview, studio tour and album photo shoot.

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

19 of 20 people found the following review helpful By Mattyjam on 15 May 2014
Format: Audio CD
As a long time Tori fan I have been hoping for some time that she would hand in a more piano-centric album, a return to her girl-and-a-piano roots of old. And with Unrepentant Geraldines she has finally delivered this.

This is the first album (sans the classically-inspired Night Of Hunters) since the mid-90s not to feature long-time collaboraters Matt Chamberlain (drums) and Jon Evans (bass). So inevitably the album is less of a band affair, featuring no less than seven tracks with only Tori and her piano. The rest of the tracks have drums programmed by her husband, who also adds his usual guitar flourishes throughout.

One thing that struck me listening to this record is that her vocals sound more controlled and strong than her more recent albums, utilising her upper range to great effect, at times harking back to her vocal stylings on Little Earthquakes.

As for the songs, title track Unrepentant Geraldines is an utter masterpiece in my eyes. The main body of the song is largely experimental and unpredictable, shifting between contrasting sections with ease, a reggae tinged verse, leading into a punk-rock style bridge, then going into a piano-centred anthemic chorus. Just when you think you've wrapped your head around the song it ends abruptly and goes into a beautiful piano-centred outro section, which, on a first listen could very easily be mistaken for an entirely different song. It really has to be heard to be believed.

Other highlights include the haunting Weatherman and the gloriously quirky Beatles-esque Giants Rolling Pin.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By O. Sweeting on 10 Oct 2014
Format: Audio CD
After reading all of these gushing, positive reviews, I was so excited about this new album, hailed as a return to form by so many. Unfortunately for me, admittedly after only 2nd listen, I am really struggling to see what the fuss was about.

For me, Tori's first seven albums were cracking. Then it all went a bit slushy and bloated. Unfortunately, for me, although this album is a soft acoustic affair, which is pleasant to listen to, the lyrics leave me cold, and the focus and passion just seems absent. Tori's voice seems washed out and floating all the time, and I really don't want to hear yet another duet with her daughter either.

Sorry Tori, I'm still waiting for you to make an album that makes me sit up and listen.
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24 of 27 people found the following review helpful By Chris on 13 May 2014
Format: Audio CD
Is this the best Tori Amos album? No.
However, is this still a fantastic album? Yes.
Everyone remembers the unconventional and, at times, groundbreaking debut "Little Earthquakes" and the 3 albums that immediately followed - "Under The Pink", "Boys for Pele" and "From The Choirgirl Hotel". Tori's output up to and including 2002's "Scarlet's Walk" was pretty flawless, however in recent years her albums have become overly long, bloated and full of filler. After a period of revisiting her childhood classical training and working on a musical with London's National Theatre, Tori has returned to making contemporary music. I'm trying to avoid the word "pop", because she's never made "pop" music. Whilst this isn't the greatest Tori album, it's most certainly worthy to bare her name, with songs like "Wild Way", "Invisible Boy" and "Selkie" echoing her earlier piano orientated work, and "16 Shades Of Blue" and "Rose Dover" containing elements reminscent of her electronic work on "From The Choirgirl Hotel" and "To Venus And Back".

Vocally, Tori sounds better than she has in at least 10 years and her piano playing is on point. Both lyrically and musically compelling and interesting, the album is exactly how you would expect Tori to sound at this stage in her career, ignoring her 2 most recent contemporary efforts "American Doll Posse" and "Abnormally Attracted To Sin", which now sound more like a desperate cry for help during a midlife crisis than compelling music.

"Giant's Rolling Pin" is a bit unnecessary and "Promise" (a duet with Tori's daughter), though a nice song, sounds out of place on the album.
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Format: Audio CD
Who are the people out there reviewing this album? All fans with subjective opinions by the look of it - 4.6 average!!! Come on, realistically it's 3/5 star album and certainly no more. Does it really compare to all the stuff (Strange Little Girls excepted) that she released in the first 10 years of her career? It's way off those dizzy heights.

I used to be a big fan, right off the bat in 1992 with her first album, and went to see her live a few times. But in recent years, after some disappointing albums, I've become more ambivalent (the one I remember was American Doll Posse, which frankly I'd rather forget but can't).

Don't get me wrong, her vocals sound great here, but after 14 studio albums you're bound to start running out of great material to write. It's very rare nowadays that she produces songs that can make you cry or make the hairs on your neck stand up, like some of the stuff on her first few albums (even up to Beekeeper, which got mixed reviews, but contains songs like the title track, Marys of the Sea and Toast - real emotional stuff!).

I mean, take the title track of this album. Overlooking the pretentious title, it's almost as if she spent ages finding the right catchy chorus, which is really good by the way, and then decided to give up on the rest of the song, just choosing to steal (& badly rehash) the pre-chorus from the song "God" from the "Under the Pink" album (1994), in the hope that noone will remember that far back. The result just isn't very good I'm afraid, and IMHO it ruins what had the potential to be a really good song, had she been able to come up with a better box to put the chorus in.

Even the pure piano songs on the album are only so so...
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