Unreasonable Behaviour: An Autobiography and over 2 million other books are available for Amazon Kindle . Learn more
£7.69
  • RRP: £10.99
  • You Save: £3.30 (30%)
FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £10.
In stock.
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon.
Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
Trade in your item
Get a £0.02
Gift Card.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Unreasonable Behaviour: An Autobiography Paperback – 6 Jun 2002


See all 8 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
£7.69
£5.43 £4.16

Trade In Promotion


Frequently Bought Together

Unreasonable Behaviour: An Autobiography + McCullin [DVD] + Don McCullin
Price For All Three: £33.44

Buy the selected items together


Trade In this Item for up to £0.02
Trade in Unreasonable Behaviour: An Autobiography for an Amazon Gift Card of up to £0.02, which you can then spend on millions of items across the site. Trade-in values may vary (terms apply). Learn more

Product details

  • Paperback: 320 pages
  • Publisher: Vintage; New Ed edition (6 Jun 2002)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0099437767
  • ISBN-13: 978-0099437765
  • Product Dimensions: 12.9 x 2.2 x 19.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (47 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 21,326 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, and more.

Product Description

Review

'McCullin is required reading if you want to know what real journalism is all about’ -- Times Saturday Supplement

‘From the opening…there is hardly a dull sentence: his prose is so lively and uninhibited…an excellent book’ -- Sunday Telegraph

‘If this was just a book of McCullin’s war photographs it would be valuable enough. But it is much more’ -- Sunday Correspondent

‘McCullin…handles much of the material culled from his war experiences like a seasoned thriller writer. His dialogue is convincing and sharp’ -- Observer

Book Description

'McCullin is required reading if you want to know what real journalism is all about.' - Times Literary Supplement

Inside This Book (Learn More)
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index | Back Cover
Search inside this book:

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

33 of 34 people found the following review helpful By M. Cockerham on 24 Feb 2000
Format: Paperback
Don McCullin has been witness to more misery than any one man has a right to, and the impact this life had had upon him to the time this book was written is clearly evident not just from the realities about which he writes, but also from the tone he uses.
Like many photographers of his ilk, he set out hoping that the pictures he took might make a difference, might make people and governments think twice about the things they do. Perhaps more than anything else, the British Government's refusal to allow him to go to the Falklands - preferring instead to send three million Mars Bars - left him with the feeling that it doesn't make a lot of difference in the end, and that, perhaps, his life has marked him rather than the world he tried to educate through his pictures.
This book is a must for anyone contemplating a career along McCullin's lines, perhaps it will make them think twice before exposing themselves needlessly to danger. It is also a must for anyone who wants to see the man behind the images that documented so much of the late Twentieth Century's most significant events. His writing style is as compelling as his images, and this book is as a result moving, and difficult to put down.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Robert Machin on 9 Nov 2008
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
A brilliantly written account of Don McCullin's experiences in every available 'hot war' across the 70s, 80s and early 90s.

On one hand, 'Unreasonable Behaviour' can be read almost as a boy's-own story of fearless derring-do, as McCullin plunges into situation after situation of almost unimaginable peril, with only a Nikon between him, an awful lot of hot metal and some really terrifying people, and with almost no regard for his personal safety. Heart enters mouth as early as the second chapter and rarely leaves thereafter.

On the other, it's one of the bleakest, most wretched books I have ever read, and not only because so much is concerned with brutality, atrocity and the very worst examples of human behaviour.

McCullin's bravery is initially astonishing - he reports very little fear even when faced with the worst danger, even when staring down a lens at its terrible consequences. Gradually it becomes evident, however, that what we are witnessing is less about heroism, more about an almost complete absence of self-worth and that the reason he can so recklessly put his life on the line is because he values it so very little. Not quite 'no sense, no feeling', for he is by no means a stupid or insensitive man, but something along those lines. There's something missing. As the book progresses towards an almost unbearably sad ending, the personal life moves increasingly centre stage and it becomes evident that the title isn't just about what McCullin has witnessed.

Note that this isn't really a book for camera geeks. McCullin is a photojournalist first and a photographer second. His interest is in getting close to the action, less about the technical quality of the snap - which, ironically, is what makes them so arresting. But you'll look in vain for anything on lenses, bodies or films, other than a useful tip on what camera works best when you have to change film under fire and flat on your back.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
20 of 21 people found the following review helpful By Philip on 28 Feb 2003
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Don McCullin has captured the very essence of war and the emotions that suffering evokes. His perceptions of war and the descriptions of the many conflicts he covered as a photojournalist are both fascinating and disturbing. This is a beautifully written autobiography, in which he also talks openly about himself and his emotions. The closing chapters of his book are especially poignant as he struggles to come to terms with work and family difficulties.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Sue Figes on 7 Oct 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I chose this book because, Don grew us at a time and place similar to me. I am also a professional photographer in a totally different Field. However Don McCullin's work is the work I respect the most of all my piers. If its war or the plight of Africans for Christian Aid, his work tells a story in its rawest form. His work is not shocking its the subject that is shocking he just has the ability and bravery to be there and capture it. No single person in my opinion has brought war and global horrors to those that are not there and experienced it than Don McCullin has. Certainly it has had massive impact on him and his family life. However I do empathise with his drive and inability to have said no to doing it. An amazing read, its not only about his great imagery, but also about him his impartial respect for the people involved, and his decency. Cannot recommend more, and honest, shocking at times but enlightening read. His exhibition on Africa brought me to tears, that is something that has not happened since my childhood.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
14 of 16 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 19 Jun 2000
Format: Paperback
This book is more than just a description of one man's life. As one wades through chapter after chapter of Don McCullin's thoughts and reflections, it's plain to see that he is a fighter. From a harsh upbringing in wartime London, to his constant struggle to bring images of conflict and misery into the public eye and his resultant battle against the ghosts of his death-stained past, a theme of conflict courses through the pages of this book like blood from a bullet wound.
Unlike John Simpson's hedonistic autobiography of his life hopping between the earth's hotspots, McCullin dashes past the glorifying clichés of foreign correspondence and portrays the harsh reality of a life under constant pressure, whether it be the initial social stigma of being of an inferior class within the media sector, the fear experienced as incoming artillery comes whistling towards him, or being locked up in a foreign prison, where death lurks around every corner.
This is McCullin's way of exorcising the demons of a life filled with frightful images that most of us merely glance at from time to time, and acknowledges this in the final chapter. Although McCullin does not delve as deep into the psyche as Anthony Loyd's memoir "My War Gone By, I Miss It So", this book rates as being one of the most sincere epistles of life on the front-line as I have experienced.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews



Feedback