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Unknown Pleasures
 
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Unknown Pleasures

23 July 2012 | Format: MP3

7.49 (VAT included if applicable)
Buy the CD album for 6.18 and get the MP3 version for FREE. Does not apply to gift orders.
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Song Title
Time
Popularity  
1
3:29
2
4:47
3
3:07
4
4:26
5
4:51
6
3:57
7
3:53
8
2:40
9
2:17
10
5:55

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Product details

  • Original Release Date: 20 July 2012
  • Release Date: 20 July 2012
  • Label: WM UK
  • Copyright: 2007 London Records 90 Ltd.
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 39:22
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B008KQBU3W
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (60 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 12,543 in MP3 Albums (See Top 100 in MP3 Albums)

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

32 of 33 people found the following review helpful By Elizabeth Gershwin on 14 Mar 2007
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
It's quite simple: if you want to listen to Joy Division's finest hour, then look no further than this, their first album.

Like many fantastic albums, this is not 'immediate', nor is it particularly accessible or masses friendly, nor should it be. Most life-affirming albums grow on people. I estimate that most people will have to listen to this album roughly five times before they start to appreciate all of it's many details, subtleties and nuances, lovingly arranged like some aural landscape.

It's starts off with 'Disorder', in which Ian Curtis declares that he has been waiting for a guide to come and take him by the hand, setting the lost and helpless tone of the entire album. Disorder is a fast and emotionally charged song, climaxing beautifully with Ian Curtis hollering "I've got the spirit, don't lose the feeling", thus encapsulating the fears and attitudes of so many other intelligent young songwriters, bubbling with emotion.

'Day Of The Lords' is an almost perfect example of foreboding and fear, perfectly encapsulated in both it's lyrics and musical sound. It is rife with atmosphere, vibrant and alive, yet painfully unhappy. The desperation with which Curtis demandingly shouts: "Where will it end?" is almost tangible. This is probably the most powerful song on the album.

'Candidate' continues on in similarly bleak fashion, nonchalantly describing the "blood on your fingers", whilst the hazy, threatening music compliments the lyrics perfectly. It is difficult to describe exactly how effectively Joy Division have used sound to create atmosphere on this album, and it is probably even more difficult to achieve.
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53 of 56 people found the following review helpful By Mr. M. A. Reed TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 12 Oct 2007
Format: Audio CD
The Joy Division catalogue is fast becoming a minefield. For a band that kept a stringent, straightforward release schedule during it's short life, the two albums and five singles have been endlessly milked to become three albums, six official live records, two Radio Session releases, an exhaustive box set, and two 'best of' compilations. With these latest re-releases, I become owner of these albums for the fourth time. (On top of this, the best Joy Division concert recording from Amsterdam, the first album recorded for RCA in 1978, as well as the official live films, remain frustratingly unavailable officially).

Make no mistake though. If ownership of music was commensurate to it's brilliance, then I'd have these records twenty times over. In one respect, you should see these reissues as a continuation of the handful of short-run, poorly selling Joy Division live albums issued in the late Nineties. The bonus discs that come with these packages, containing full recordings from the miniscule Joy Division concert archive, are welcome additions to the canon. Given the limitations of time, technology, and cashflow from a penniless Manchester band struggling on an indie label and regularly playing shows to a few hundred people without anything approaching a big hit, it's some wonder that anything remains in a usable form. As Peter Hook once said, they couldn't even record rehearsals and thus, the songs only existed at the time those four people were in the same room together. So little remains, and yet, so much.

Of the three albums, "Unknown Pleasures" is the icy cold sound of a frozen, sterile Manchester : a fierce contrast to the live sound showcased on the second disc, "Unknown Pleasures" is and was an utterly alien experience.
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64 of 68 people found the following review helpful By A. Gerritz on 4 Oct 2007
Format: Audio CD
BEWARE! If you already own the Heart and Soul box set, then you already own all but 2 of the tracks on this 2 CD set, since Unknown Pleasures is included in its entirety on the box set, and the first 10 tracks on Disc 4 are 10 of the 12 tracks on the bonus live CD. The 2 tracks not on the box set are Shadowplay (in fact previously unreleased from this gig), and Transmission, previously available on the 1988 Atmosphere CD single and on one of the 1995 Love Will Tear Us Apart CD singles. Still a good gig. Actual date and location were The Factory, Hulme, Manchester, July 13, 1979.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 27 Jun 2000
Format: Audio CD
Dark, brooding, caustrophobic...genius. Joy division's debut is their masterpiece: at once driving, powerful music, and at the same moment vunerable, withering music of the soul. Day of the Lords and Shadowplay are examples of Joy division's soundscapes that borrowed from the previous decade's nihilsim and created the sound of being alone and desolate. The stark cover, abrasive bass lines and otherworldy production portray the world of Ian Curtis as a man whom had looked through life, and not liked what he had seen.
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24 of 26 people found the following review helpful By J. Steele-Perkins on 7 May 2006
Format: Audio CD
For some reason it's taken me 15 years of knowing about Unknown Pleasures to actually get round to buying it. I guess I always thought it was going to be too oppressive, too claustrophobic and too haunted by the ghost of Ian Curtis to be anything other than a depressing and down-right dreary experience.

But actually I really was very wrong! Listening to Unknown Pleasures isn't a depressing or oppressive experience (despite what other people might say.) Intense and dark, yes, and I'd admit to Ian Curtis' lyrics being on the dreary side, but Joy Division knew how to write songs, and the sheer melody of tracks like She's Lost Control and Disorder are positively up-lifting.

Also, Unknown Pleasure is one of the most spacious sounding albums I've heard. Apparently Martin Hannett recorded each instrument separately (including each drum of the drum kit) giving the album its clean-cut and pure sound. It means even when Joy Division 'rock out' (as on Interzone) the guitar sounds clipped and self-contained, brimming with barely repressed energy. It also gives the album quite an electronic feel, an effect enhanced by the many studio tweaks (the echo-effect on Ian Curtis voice on She's Lost Control, the wooshes and laser sounds on Insight, for example.)

The sparse sound also sets the stage for Ian Curtis' characteristically haunted vocals, the only element allowed to be expansive and emotional. It cannot be over-stated just how beautiful and harrowing Ian Curtis voice is. He sings with a passion and intensity that leaves you feeling suddenly slightly under-whelmed by Editors and their ilk.

Like other great post punk albums of the era (eg Fear of Music, Entertainment!
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