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Universal Compassion: Inspiring Solution for Difficult Times Hardcover – Mar 1997


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Hardcover, Mar 1997
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Product details

  • Hardcover: 176 pages
  • Publisher: Tharpa Publications; 3rd Revised edition edition (Mar 1997)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0948006579
  • ISBN-13: 978-0948006579
  • Product Dimensions: 13.5 x 1.4 x 21.6 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 3,340,623 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

More About the Author

Geshe Kelsang Gyatso was born in Tibet and is a fully accomplished meditation master and internationally renowned teacher of Buddhism. Resident in the West since 1977, he is the author of 21 highly acclaimed books that perfectly transmit the ancient wisdom of Buddhism to our modern world. He has also founded over 1100 Kadampa Buddhist Centres and groups throughout the world.

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Review

'This book is an admirable accomplishment in presenting the profound teachings of present-day Mahayana Buddhism.' - Buddhism Today 'It could be read with profit by anyone whose religion demands the exercise of compassion.' - Faith and Freedom 'An inspiring book for all who aspire to practise the Buddhist path.' - Buddhist Studies Review

About the Author

Geshe Kelsang Gyatso was born in Tibet and is a fully accomplished meditation master and internationally renowned teacher of Buddhism. Living in the West since 1977, he is the author of a series of highly acclaimed books that transmit perfectly the ancient wisdom of Buddhism to our contemporary life. He has also founded many Buddhist Centres throughout the world for the study and practice of Mahayana Buddhism.

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The instructions on training the mind were originally given by Buddha Shakyamuni. Read the first page
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Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index | Back Cover
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3.8 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

19 of 22 people found the following review helpful By langleydavid9@netscape.net on 20 Jan 2001
Format: Hardcover
As in 'Eight steps to happiness' this wonderful author presents truly practical methods for improving compassion for those around us. Geshe Kelsang Gyatso shows us how we can weaken and ultimately overcome our habitual ways of negative and destructive thinking so we may find greater happiness in life. This master clearly speaks from the position of someone who has personally achieved all the teachings and discovered for himself their beauty. Also explains how what appear to be problems and difficulties can be transformed into causes for happiness.
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By Feeling_charmed on 14 April 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Another good book by Geshe La but I have to say they repeat themselves now. Almost whole paragraphs are taken from other books.

I would like to see a new book from this man.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful By James W on 14 Aug 2011
Format: Paperback
Venerable Geshe Kelsang Gyatso is a fully qualified Buddhist Master, and this becomes immediately obvious when reading his books.
No one, in my experience, explains the wonderful intricacies of Buddhist Philosophy in such a clear and simple way. This is a truly a masterful book that I feel very fortunate to have encountered.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Graeme on 12 July 2011
Format: Paperback
If you want to get your hands on some practical solutions for unhappiness then this book contains A LOT. It is a Buddhist text and that means it references things like past & future lives, prayer etc. Maybe you're interested in that stuff, maybe you're not. But I think everyone should read it for the sections on 'what is self cherishing' 'taking & giving' & 'transforming adverse conditions'. Buddhism is just inner science at the end of the day and if something is wrong in your life (ie, you're suffering') then it's time to look in your mind (where the suffering is) and learn how to fix it. Beautiful text.
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2 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Jenny on 21 Jun 2012
Format: Paperback
I bought this book a while back when looked into New Kadampa Buddhism, as they disapprove of one reading books written by anyone else than this author, their libraries contain only books by him, and only his books are taught in the classes. He is an organisation head that they think is an "enlightened being", their guru, and it's a kind of break-away "Buddhist" organisation who are growing in the West in a very un-Buddhist way. So first of all the problem is that the books come from that kind of background. Secondly, Buddhism is actually a useful and quite down to earth, maybe more philosophy than religion, and can relate well and clearly to real life, with no conflict with science etc. However, the author comes from a quite strange side of how to see Buddhism, in which it's all about worshiping deities and saying particular prayers, and saying things like that people used to have thousands of years long lifespans, etc. Buddhism does not have to be like this at all. It is more the quirk of the author and his organisation, so makes using this book to teach you real Buddhism a problem. Thirdly, a lot of points in the book do not make sense - for example, the way it's explained that a body cannot be a body because each part of the body is not a body, therefore the collection of them can't be. Much as the author seems to think he's made an interesting point, actually to many it would seems about as simple as that a there can in fact be a "herd" even though each cow isn't a "herd", it's because the word is a collective noun. What's being explained doesn't actually make sense or mean anything. On referring to the original texts they made total sense to me, yet this "explanation" was a confusing mess that made no sense.Read more ›
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