Unforgiven 1992

Amazon Instant Video

(134) IMDb 8.3/10
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In his directorial masterpiece, Clint Eastwood plays a reformed gun-slinger forced to pick up his gun again to feed his family and take on a sadistic sheriff. However he must contend with his new moral code while avenging the town prostitutes, and blurs the line between heroism and villainy, man and myth.

Starring:
Morgan Freeman,Richard Harris
Runtime:
2 hours, 5 minutes

Available to watch on supported devices.

Unforgiven

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Product Details

Genres Action & Adventure
Director Clint Eastwood
Starring Morgan Freeman, Richard Harris
Supporting actors Gene Hackman, Anna Thomson, Jaimz Woolvett, Clint Eastwood, Anthony James, Saul Rubinek, Frances Fisher
Studio Warner Bros.
BBFC rating Suitable for 15 years and over
Rental rights 48 hour viewing period. Details
Purchase rights Stream instantly and download to 2 locations Details
Format Amazon Instant Video (streaming online video and digital download)

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

17 of 17 people found the following review helpful By William Cohen VINE VOICE on 25 Feb. 2008
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
This film tells a story in a rather indirect way. From the prologue, which tells us about a comely and virtuous woman who marries a violent and angry man, we don't quite know where we are.

Then we see a gruesome attack of a prostitute and some rather unexpected summary justice from Little Bill (Gene Hackman). From this point onwards, the story, and the characters, tilt one way and the other. You like Little Bill, but he takes things too far. You like the Eastwood character, but you can't entirely forgive him, and you can see him sliding downwards.

The action has lingered with me for several days. What does this film have to say about hellraisers? What am I to make of the amazing denouement? Is there any justice in the ending?

Looking back there are scenes that you remember, like the mythical gunslinger missing a simple target over and over again, or Little Bill and his hopeless roof-building. The details ornament the story in delightful ways.

It's an absorbing film which confronts you with much complexity. Should law enforcers make examples of people? Do light punishments cause greater troubles? How do mythologies influence our actions? This is a very special film.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By J. Cushnan on 6 Feb. 2003
Format: DVD
Coming from a western fan like myself, it has not been easy to give Unforgiven the personal accolade of 'the greatest western'. I love The Searchers, The Magnificent Seven, Shane, High Noon, the Eastwood spaghettis and many, many more. But Unforgiven takes all the usual ingredients and shakes them into a whole new recipe for a rivetting story of has-been gunslingers on a mission to right some wrongs. Clint Eastwood is perfectly matured for the role of William Munny and Morgan Freeman adds dignity to his Ned Logan, as they ride with the young Schofield Kid (Jaimz Woolvett). They encounter trouble with Gene Hackman's Little Bill and the nasty, violent West becomes a reality.
Unforgiven won 4 Oscars but it deserves to be watched and studied by aspiring directors as the perfect example of a fine genre, served exceptionally well by many in the past, subjected to exploitation by boring 'oaters' across the years but given a golden prestige by Clint Eastwood that will be difficult to impossible to surpass.
Watch, listen and enjoy. It could be the last great western ever made!
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28 of 30 people found the following review helpful By Manco on 28 Jan. 2005
Format: DVD
Clint Eastwood dedicated his Western masterpiece Unforgiven "...to Sergio and Don." (Sergio Leone and Don Siegel) This was an entirely fitting tribute to the two directors who probably had the greatest impact on Eastwood's career. Leone, of course, cast Eastwood as The Man With No Name in the Dollars trilogy, whereas Siegel directed Eastwood in his other iconic role of Dirty Harry.
When watching Unforgiven it is clear that Eastwood learnt valuable lessons from both of these great directors: Leone's rugged, unromantic view of the West and Siegel's flare for staging action. However, Clint Eastwood is a director with talent all of his own and in Unforgiven we are given a special treat.
This 10th anniversary edition does full justice to the film Eastwood wanted us to see, most notably in its 2.35:1 widescreen presentation. The extra features are also useful and interesting additions serving as more than just padding.
Unforgiven is a Western and as such a genre piece. However, more than that it is a powerful story, a cautionary tale, and above all intelligent and emotionally gripping. It would be unforgivable of you not to embrace it!
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34 of 37 people found the following review helpful By Michael Crane on 28 May 2003
Format: DVD
"Unforgiven" is much more than a breathtaking Western, it's an amazing film altogether. With elements of drama and film noir, this is a picture that shows us that there are some demons you can never put to rest, no matter how hard you try.
Clint Eastwood stars as William Munny, a once notorious and violent killer and thief. If Munny didn't like you, chances were that you wouldn't live long enough for him to tell you so. However, that was in the old days. Now, he's just a quiet and tired farmer who is a devoted father still in mourning of his dead wife. He's been straight for years and is trying to put all of his demons to rest, but you still get the feeling that no matter how hard he tries, he will always be haunted. An opportunity comes to him in the name of 'The Schofield Kid.' He gives him a chance to be his partner and have him help on a bounty. Knowing that the money could help his family out, Munny finally decides to take the Kid up on the offer. He also brings with him Ned Logan; an old friend and partner. Little Bill Daggett is the Sheriff in town, and the thing he hates most are assassins. He will do anything in his power to take care of them and make sure they do not succeed on their killing. The last remaining part of the film stands out the most and is so well executed that it catches you off guard.
This really is a great film and it surprised me like I would've never expected. I don't like Westerns all that much, but this isn't your typical Western. That is probably why I enjoyed it so much. There is so much story and character development. You really are able to sympathize with Munny, despite his dark and violent past.
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