Buy Used
Used - Good See details
Price: £5.37

or
 
   
Have one to sell? Sell yours here
Tell the Publisher!
I’d like to read this book on Kindle

Don't have a Kindle? Get your Kindle here, or download a FREE Kindle Reading App.

Understanding the SQL's Persistent Stored Modules: A Complete Guide to SQL/PSM (The Morgan Kaufmann Series in Data Management Systems) [Paperback]

Jim Melton
2.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)

Available from these sellers.


‹  Return to Product Overview

Table of Contents

List of Figures
List of Railroad Diagrams
List of Tables
Preface
1 Introduction to PSM-96
1.1 Introduction
1.2 A Multipart Standard
1.2.1 Why Is SQL Partitioned?
1.2.2 How Is SQL Partitioned?
1.3 Stored SQL -- The Focus of This Book
1.3.1 The Need for Stored Database
Languages
1.3.2 Vendors' Responses to the Need for
Stored Database Languages
1.4 Why Do You Want This Book?
1.5 A Brief History of SQL/PSM
1.6 Conforming to SQL/PSM
1.7 SQL/PSM Feature Summary
1.8 Relationship with SQL-92 and
Understanding the New SQL: A Complete Guide
1.9 Chapter Summary
2 Getting Started with PSM-96
2.1 Introduction
2.2 Summary of Relevant SQL-92 Features
2.2.1 Modules and Procedures
2.2.2 One Statement at a Time
2.2.3 What Do SQL Statements Return?
2.2.4 Where Are SQL Statements Executed?
2.2.5 SQL Conditions
2.3 Basic SQL/PSM Concepts
2.3.1 Stored Modules
2.3.2 Stored Routines
2.3.3 SQL Parameters
2.3.4 Condition Handlers
2.3.5 SQL Variables
2.3.6 Paths
2.4 Transaction Model
2.4.1 Atomic Execution Contexts
2.4.2 Compound Statements: ATOMIC and NOT ATOMIC
2.5 Control Statements
2.6 The Example Application
2.7 Chapter Summary
3 Storing SQL
3.1 Introduction
3.2 SQL-Server Modules and SQL-Client
Modules
3.3 SQL-Server Modules and SQL-Invoked Routines
3.3.1 Catalogs, Schemas, and Schema
Objects in SQL
3.3.2 Using SQL-Invoked Routines in
Multiple Schemas
3.3.3 Managing Dependencies
3.4 Are SQL-Server Modules Worth the Trouble?
3.4.1 Sharing Declared Objects
3.4.2 Bundling Related Routines
3.4.3 Shrink-Wrapped Database Software
3.5 Procedures and Functions
3.6 Creating and Deleting SQL-Server
Modules and Their Routines
3.6.1 Creating SQL-Server Modules
3.6.2 Dropping SQL-Server Modules
3.6.3 Creating SQL-Invoked Routines
3.6.4 Dropping SQL-Invoked Routines
3.7 Popular Implementations
3.7.1 IBM DB2
3.7.2 INFORMIX 7.1
3.7.3 Microsoft SQL Server
3.7.4 ORACLE 7.3
3.7.5 Sybase SQL Server
3.8 Some Examples
3.9 Chapter Summary
4 External Routines
4.1 Introduction
4.2 Stored SQL Isn't Always SQL
4.2.1 Requirement for External Routines
4.2.2 Trade-Offs between SQL Routines and External Routines
4.2.3 External Routines and SQL Products
4.3 Storing External Routines
4.3.1 SQL Syntax
4.3.2 Semantics
4.3.3 Associated Metadata
4.4 Where Are External Routines Actually Stored?
4.4.1 Inside the Database Itself
4.4.2 In the File System
4.4.3 Other Possibilities
4.5 Execution Context and Trade-Offs
4.5.1 Database Server Context
4.5.2 Application Program Context
4.5.3 Distinct Context
4.6 Popular Implementations
4.6.1 IBM DB2
4.6.2 INFORMIX 7.1
4.6.3 Microsoft SQL Server
4.6.4 ORACLE 7.3
4.6.5 Sybase SQL Server
4.7 Examples
4.8 Chapter Summary
5 SQL Routines
5.1 Introduction
5.2 Why Store Routines Written in SQL?
5.2.1 Requirement for SQL Routines
5.2.2 Trade-Offs between SQL Routines and External Routines
5.2.3 SQL Routines and SQL Products
5.3 Storing SQL Routines
5.3.1 SQL Syntax
5.3.2 Semantics
5.3.3 Associated Metadata
5.4 SQL's Limitations
5.5 Execution Context
5.6 Popular Implementations
5.6.1 IBM DB2
5.6.2 INFORMIX 7.1
5.6.3 Microsoft SQL Server
5.6.4 ORACLE 7.3
5.6.5 Sybase SQL Server
5.7 Examples
5.8 Chapter Summary
6 Polymorphism
6.1 Introduction
6.2 Polymorphism--Just a Big Word?
6.3 Why Would I Care about It?
6.4 Routine Resolution Basics
6.4.1 10,000-Meter View
6.4.2 The Influence of Paths
6.5 Detailed Algorithm
6.5.1 Example Setup
6.5.2 The Algorithm
6.5.3 Type Precedence Lists
6.6 Popular Implementations
6.6.1 IBM DB2
6.6.2 INFORMIX 7.1
6.6.3 Microsoft SQL Server
6.6.4 ORACLE 7.3
6.6.5 Sybase SQL Server
6.7 Chapter Summary
7 Computational Completeness
7.1 Introduction
7.2 Why Should SQL Be a Computationally
Complete Language?
7.3 Advantages and Disadvantages
7.4 In Your Professional Lifetime?
7.5 The SQL Control Statements
7.5.1 CALL Statement
7.5.2 RETURN Statement
7.5.3 Labeling Control Statements
7.5.4 Compound Statement
7.5.5 Handler Declaration
7.5.6 Condition Declaration
7.5.7 SQL Variable Declaration
7.5.8 Assignment Statement
7.5.9 IF Statement
7.5.10 CASE Statement
7.5.11 LEAVE Statement
7.5.12 LOOP Statement
7.5.13 WHILE Statement
7.5.14 REPEAT Statement
7.5.15 FOR Statement
7.5.16 SIGNAL Statement
7.5.17 RESIGNAL Statement
7.5.18 A Word about Nesting
7.6 SQL/PSM versus Other Languages
7.7 Popular Implementations
7.7.1 IBM DB2
7.7.2 INFORMIX 7.1
7.7.3 Microsoft SQL Server
7.7.4 ORACLE 7.3
7.7.5 Sybase SQL Server
7.8 An Example
7.9 Chapter Summary
8 Condition Handling
8.1 Introduction
8.2 Exception Conditions and Completion
Conditions
8.3 What Are Condition Handlers?
8.4 Types of Condition Handlers
8.5 Declaring Condition Handlers
8.6 Semantics of Condition Handlers
8.7 Condition Handler Scopes
8.8 Popular Implementations
8.8.1 IBM DB2
8.8.2 INFORMIX 7.1
8.8.3 Microsoft SQL Server
8.8.4 ORACLE 7.3
8.8.5 Sybase SQL Server
8.9 Examples
8.10 Chapter Summary
9 Completing the Picture
9.1 Introduction
9.2 The SET PATH Statement
9.3 Dynamic Descriptor Fields and
Diagnostic Area Fields
9.3.1 Descriptor Area Fields
9.3.2 Diagnostic Area Fields
9.4 Information Schema Enhancements
9.4.1 The DEFINITION_SCHEMA Enhancements
9.4.2 The INFORMATION_SCHEMA Enhancements
9.4.3 SQL Built-In Functions
9.5 New SQLSTATE Values
9.6 Chapter Summary
10 The Next Generation of SQL/PSM
10.1 Introduction
10.2 What Major Enhancements Are Expected?
10.2.1 Local Declarations
10.2.2 Handler Types
10.2.3 SQL Module Maintenance
10.2.4 Dynamic Execution of Control Statements
10.2.5 SQLSTATE Values Using Expressions
10.2.6 Default Values Provided Using
Routine Invocations
10.2.7 SIGNAL and RESIGNAL Statement Enhancements
10.3 When Can We Expect to See It?
10.4 Are There Alternatives?
10.5 Chapter Summary
A The PSM-96 Example
A.1 Introduction
A.2 The Schema Definition
A.3 Application Code
B Relevant Standards Bodies
B.1 Introduction
B.2 Contacting ISO
B.3 Selected National Standards Bodies
C The Complete SQL/PSM-96 Language
Index

‹  Return to Product Overview