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Understanding the Digital Economy: Data, Tools and Research Hardcover – 20 Nov 2000


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"This comprehensive and penetrating collection frames and answers many of the most important questions of economics raised by cyberspace andits regulation. This book is a critical resource to anyone wanting to understand the economics of online behavior and online life." -Lawrence Lessig, Jack N. and Lillian R. Berkman Professor for Entrepreneurial Legal Studies, Harvard Law School "This comprehensive and penetrating collection frames and answers many of the most importance questions of economics raised by cyberspace and its regulation. This book is a critical resource to anyone wanting to understand the economics of online behavior and online life." Lawrence Lessig, Jack N. and Lillian R. Berkman Professor forEntrepreneurial Legal Studies, Harvard Law School

About the Author

Erik Brynjolfsson, Schussel Family Professor at MIT's Sloan School of Management and Director of the MIT Center for Digital Business, is the coeditor of Understanding the Digital Economy: Data, Tools, and Research (MIT Press). Brian Kahin is Senior Fellow at the Computer & Communications Industry Association in Washington, DC. He is also Research Investigator and Adjunct Professor at the University of Michigan School of Information and a special advisor to the Provost's Office. He is a coeditor of Transforming Enterprise (MIT Press, 2004) and many other books.

Inside This Book (Learn More)
First Sentence
Although there is now a substantial body of literature on the role of information technology in the economy, much of it is inconclusive. Read the first page
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Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index
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Amazon.com: 3 reviews
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
To truly understand the information age, read this book! 11 Mar 2001
By Jonathan Koomey - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I'm a voracious reader of books and articles about recent developments in information technology (IT). This book is the first I've found to present the latest research in economics, business, and public policy related to IT, and to do so in a way that is accurate, comprehensive, readable, and engaging. The editors deserve kudos for their choice of articles and for enforcing the analytical rigor so often lacking in consulting reports and popular articles in this field. I heartily recommend this book!
12 of 15 people found the following review helpful
The Definitive Guide 11 Oct 2000
By George Harris - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
This book is an essential antidote to all the fluff out there written by pundits and consultants. The books consists of 14 chapters written by experts in the field reporting original research on how the digital economy really works and how it is transforming business.
Anyone interested in seriously understanding the "new" economy needs to read this book.
6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
Some great stuff in here! 23 Oct 2000
By "henry_georgeiii" - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
Some of the chapters in this book have priceless material, e.g. the Chapter on "Understanding Digital Markets" by Smith, Bailey and Brynjolfsson and the review of technology's role in growing income inequality by Katz.
We need more research like this.
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