Ultimatum and over 2 million other books are available for Amazon Kindle . Learn more
FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £10.
Only 1 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon.
Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
Ultimatum has been added to your Basket
FREE Delivery on orders over £10.
Used: Very Good | Details
Sold by the book house
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: The book has been read, but is in excellent condition. Pages are intact and not marred by notes or highlighting. The spine remains undamaged.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Ultimatum Hardcover – 1 Jul 2009


See all 16 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
£9.99
£5.23 £0.01
£9.99 FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £10. Only 1 left in stock (more on the way). Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.


Product details

  • Hardcover: 400 pages
  • Publisher: Atlantic Books (1 July 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1848870876
  • ISBN-13: 978-1848870871
  • Product Dimensions: 16.6 x 3.7 x 24.2 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (19 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 662,550 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, and more.

Product Description

Review

`Stoking terror has been a staple of thrillers ever since Erskine Childers wrote "The Riddle of the Sands" more than 100 years ago. Foreign invasions? Deadly microbes? Nuclear explosions? Each decade boasts its emblematic page-turners. These may be works of fiction, but for the most part they are inspired by the real-world terrors of their own particular time... [Ultimatum is] a cut above ... The heir to Tom Clancy and Michael Crichton, Ultimatum is better than either. The first politico-diplomatic-disaster thriller, Mr Glass's engrossing work leaves the reader thinking long after the last page is turned... His portrait of the effects of global warming is as vivid as it is dark. The author's research, both scientific and political, is meticulous, yet it never swamps the story. The book may be set in the future, but it is really about today. Ultimatum does a better job of convincing the reader about the price the world will pay for its complacency about global warming than any international grandstanding or dry scientific reports... This is a novel for politician and non-politician alike. And the ending is brilliant.'
-- Economist

About the Author

Matthew Glass is a pseudonym. Ultimatum is his first novel.

Inside This Book (Learn More)
Browse and search another edition of this book.
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Excerpt
Search inside this book:

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

3.6 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
I read two completely contradictory reviews of this environmental disaster thriller before I started it. The Economist reckoned it was an "engrossing work" that "leaves the reader thinking long after the last page is turned" .. sounds great, I thought. But the Guardian review dripped with scorn; "it's as if the publisher of Hansard had been allowed to rewrite The War of the Worlds." Oh dear. So I decided to try a couple of pages before I took it straight to the charity shop, and I was immediately hooked. Ignore the Guardian, this book is fantastic.

It's 2032, and Straight Joe Benton has just been elected President of the USA. But before he's even been sworn in, he's called into a top secret meeting with his out-going rival, who reveals that global warming is accelerating at an unprecedented rate, and that large parts of the world will soon be under water and millions of Americans will have to be relocated if global carbon emissions aren't drastically reduced now, with catastrophic effect on the American economy. President Benton must agree a deal with the other super-polluters, the Chinese, then bring the rest of the world on board before it's too late.

It's The West Wing meets The Day After Tomorrow, but with the action cut out. There are no giant tidal waves here, just a lot of intricate political manoeuvring, negotiations and international talks. Although it's meant to be 2032, this isn't really a book set in the future. Matthew Glass has expended no energy on inventing new technology, or even imaging a different world stage. Instead, this is a book about now - about the virtual impossibility of reaching an amicable emissions deal, and what the cost of one might truly be.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
By ruth1044 on 3 April 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
this is the first book of this sort I have read,always shied away from anything like this in the past as i thought it wasnt for me but i was pleasantly surprised at how much i enjoyed this book. I felt it was a bit slow to start but now after having read it, realise it was building up to a very good nail biting finish.It shows how quickly things can escalate between two countries and get out of control.The story centred around global climate change and the USA and China. The newly elected USA president starts in office with all good intentions,of putting his country on a good economic path and a solid plan for the relocation of a few million american citizens from their homes to a safer location ,as climate change threatens certain parts of the usa.A rise in ocean levels has been predicted, but the president is out of the blue given access to documents that reveal the proposed plan has to be radically re assessed as things are much worse than he has been led to believe.He approaches the Chinese as they are the biggest country causing the most pollution.Their president prevaricates and does everything he can to hold up any agreement, until discussion seems futile,from there things go rapidly downhill and the outcome is quite horrific. This is set in the future ,a good few years from the present day,and possibly and hopefully the effect of global climate change will not be as much as portrayed in the book,but all in all it makes for a very enjoyable read giving a glimpse of what the future might hold.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By R. Prince on 4 Aug. 2009
Format: Hardcover
Like others, I bought this based on the Economist review and it was an ideal read for a holiday. The climax at the end is gripping. In fact, I lent it to 3 other family members while away and they all enjoyed it too - one staying up much of the night to finish it off. It brings together two major trends that are going to play out in many of our lifetimes - climate change and the rise of China - and gets you thinking hard about what might happen. Is this book totally believeable... well, I'm not quite sure. But it's well worth a read and then you can make your own mind up
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I have missed out the normal first three or four paragraphs of a standard review and just written the last because that is perhaps the bit the reader is most interesed in.

It kept me gripped, especially towards the end and was a believable political narrative. The book reads like a screenplay and the dialogue-rich style is appropriate. It's most important contribution is to provoke thought about whether mankind will ever be able to rise above our most primitive instincts and act in concert to tackle the real issues that are already out there staring us in the face. It provides a believeable possible outcome if we fail. Sadly, Copenhagen recently only gives this scenario more credence.

Like most reviewers, The Economist led me to this book and I was not disappointed.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
10 of 13 people found the following review helpful By Patrick Shepherd on 2 Aug. 2009
Format: Hardcover
This is a book about the political process, about diplomacy, about how it's very easy for solidly good intentions to turn into a world disaster. Unfortunately, it's based on some premises that don't stand up well in the light of day, and lacks any action quota that might have turned this into a good thriller.

The starting scenario begins in 2032, with a newly elected president determined to actually do something about the global warming crisis and its effect on millions of Americans. For by this time, its effects have become pronounced enough that Congress has already implemented some measures to help those most affected, mainly to help those who live in low-lying or drought-prone areas relocate to other communities. President Benton doesn't think that what has been done is enough, and he is soon informed that what he imagined was needed is going to be woefully short of what is really required, as new, secret, information has been gathered that indicates that the warming trend is accelerating much faster that earlier predicted, and that more action is needed immediately both domestically in terms of relocation funds and internationally in getting the rest of the world, most especially China, to really do something to curb carbon emissions.

As a premise, the above has several flaws. First are the time frames imagined. Current projections show sea level rise in the next twenty five years to be quite minimal, but this book assumes that it has already happened (by several years earlier, if Congress has already placed it on the action agenda) to a degree that places like Florida and Louisiana are already only marginally habitable. Second is the concept that new scientific data of the type described would be only available to the United States, and could be kept secret.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews


Look for similar items by category


Feedback