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Uglies: Shay's Story (Uglies Trilogy (Pb)) Library Binding – 6 Mar 2012


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Product details

  • Library Binding: 208 pages
  • Publisher: Turtleback Books; Reprint edition (6 Mar. 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0606264752
  • ISBN-13: 978-0606264754
  • Product Dimensions: 20.3 x 14.2 x 2.3 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,339,472 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By N. Buckley on 13 Jun. 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I think this is one of the few series where books writing about another person's story in that series will work. Shay's story affects Tally's a lot, it's Shay that kicks off the whole plot, and we know that Shay's story started before Tally's did. So, I loved this book for offering us that perspective.

However, I have a few gripes with the fact that it is a graphic novel. I love seeing the Uglies world, and the people, but Shay is a complex character, and more so as the series progresses. I don't feel the graphic novel format is complex enough to handle it, and I don't feel we get a good enough view into Shay's head, her thoughts and feelings as events occur. The thought bubbles we do get feel very simple and basic. Maybe it's just because I'm not used to graphic novels, and the use of the images to show these things over the "traditional" text, but I think we missed out on a lot of inner monologue, especially when Shay decides to not head to the Smoke the first time. I also don't think we get to see enough of the Smoke, it feels like Shay's time is very brief there, yet she spends probably up to a month if not more there before Tally arrives. I don't feel like I get a good of a view of the life there, as I do from Tally's perspective.

The other issue I have is that it is black and white. I'm not sure if this was a creative decision or one based on cost, but I feel it missed an opportunity to give us a better view into the Uglies world.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 22 reviews
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
Great addition to the Uglies Series! 7 April 2012
By Michelle Madow - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I don't typically read graphic novels (aka I've never read one in my life), but when I saw this was an addition to Scott Westerfeld's Uglies series, I knew I had to give it a try! I love the Uglies books, so any new view I'm given into the awesome world Scott created is something I love to see.

When I first started reading it was tough to adjust to the change of medium (getting lots of the story through pictures instead of words). However, after a few chapters in I stopped thinking about how different it was from reading a text book and was able to be completely immersed in the story. I loved seeing the pictures -- one of the things I was fascinated with in the Uglies series is all the technology Scott created. It was super cool being able to see drawings of everything - the ping rings, hoverboards, crash bracelets, spagbol packets, etc. The whole story came to life on a whole new level through the illustrations. The only issue I had was that it was difficult to see the differences between the Uglies, Pretties, and Specials -- they looked pretty similar, except minor details. When reading the series, I imagined the differences to be much more vast then they were in the illustrations in Shay's Story.

This book drastically changed my perception of Shay. It's been a long time since I read Uglies (six years I think!) but I remember thinking that Shay was overly jealous and easily angered. When reading from Tally's point of view, I sympathized with Tally, not Shay. But getting to see the story from Shay's point of view totally changed my opinion of her! I understand now why she was so upset about Tally and David's relationship, and fully sympathize with her feelings. It makes sense why she was upset, and feeling like things weren't working out fairly for her.

This book is a MUST READ for fans of the Uglies series! If you haven't read the Uglies series, I recommend reading the series before reading this part. Great work, Scott!! Looking forward to the next installment of Shay's Story.
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
Great for Uglies Fans! 2 Sept. 2012
By Nicole @ Paperback Princess - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
I have to admit, I don't remember much of what happened in Uglies, but I remembered enough to not be lost. Maybe this gave some information away as to what happened in the book, but I don't recall. I really like the idea of authors giving a little bit more away about their stories by using the adventures of another main character.

The idea behind the Uglies series is that you are "ugly" until you turn 16 and then you have a surgery to make you a "pretty" of course none of these people realize that there is something seriously wrong with this, instead they can't wait to be totally "bubbly". This book has its own slang which is a great touch to add to the atmosphere of a new world.

It was one thing to read about the "ruins" of the world world where Shay and Tally would sneak out to, but getting to see them was really awesome. You get to see how the "rusties" as were called, lived, and its erie because these are our cities that they're playing in. The ruins of our life are their playground.

The other great part about having this be a graphic novel is that you get to see how beautiful these young girls are and yet theyre being told that they're ugly. They have selfdepricating nicknames like skinny, squinty, and mouse. Hearing the conversations that Shay and Tally have about what Tally wants to change about herself is so sad because that is what is wrong with society now. Westerfeld's statement about that society is what our society is, essentially we tell young girls that their nose is too big, their forehead is too high and their lips are too small, except in New Pretty Town that all changes because at 16 they change you and make you this mold of who they want you to be and not who you are. We are slowly turning our society into this world of vapid people who are untinteresting and get surgery whenever and why ever they want.

Westerfeld had a lot to say on the matter of how we make young people feel and I was really glad for it. The entire series took up 4 books (I'm sad to say I never finished them, but I think I will revisit the series) and now they are revisiting this wonderful world in the form of graphic novels. I wish that other authors would do that (Just because I'm greedy and never want the story to end) but I just can't wait to see what the next one will be like.
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
terrific graphic book 6 Mar. 2012
By Harriet Klausner - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
In Uglyville humans are ugly until their sixteenth birthday. At that time they must choose to become a Pretty and enjoy the fruits of society or remain as they are. Most opt for the Surge to change them into a Pretty as the materialistic hedonism of obedience supersedes toiling as an Ugly.

As Shay nears her landmark birthday, she looks forward to transforming into a Pretty; as does her friend Tally. Both are daredevil risk takers tampering with their hoverboard safety mechanisms. After a crash landing, Shay meets Zane known as Stretch. She says her friends call her "Skinny". He tells her he plans to go out not up as she did. Shay thinks he means the burbs with the middle Pretties, but he says beyond the grid. Stretch introduces Skinny to the skeptical teen Crims who question anything society claims as fact. Feeling an affinity with the Crims, as her sixteenth birthday nears; she must decide between Shay the Pretty in the city or Skinny the Ugly in the wilderness.

Fans of Tally's saga sees the story from Shay's perspective in this terrific graphic book that captures the same values questions of what rights a citizen has to say no to a society demanding conformity. The storyline is fast-paced with illustrations enhancing the action. Readers will appreciate Shay's choice in a society that demands compliance in exchange for a life of "pleasure". Though targeting middle school children, the entertaining storyline will remind readers of commentary by Dylan Ratigan (see Greedy Bastards) and Charles J. Sykes (see A Nation of Moochers: America's Addiction to Getting Something for Nothing) though Shay insists there is a price to pay.

Harriet Klausner
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
What is Truth? 20 April 2012
By Tim Lasiuta - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Scott Westerfield and Devin Grayson have brought the 'Uglies' to Life.

This, I must admit, is my first exposure to Westerfield's fiction, and I like it. Reading this, I read more than an adventure, a little more than a 'joy ride', more like Logans run sans the happy ending, and if I were to put his into a musical perspective, a cross between Rush's Red Barchetta and 2112, the Soliliquoy.

The question behind Uglies is that of what is 'real'? What is truth? As I said, this is a deep story that explores Shay, and her conflicts. She tries to run from being pretty, and being superficial, yet in the end, who can escape some form of conformity? The only variable is that of how much do we choose to conform.

Shay and her friends run to the forest and wild, to live for just a short while. The Crims, as they explore the ungoverned wild, live free of restraints, and step back into a polar opposite of what they grew up in. Close to the theme is that of trust, who can you trust?

Just whom you can, what you can, and what you may be are not always what you expect. This book is much more than I would expect, and being Pretty is not all it is cracked up to be.

Very well done, in terms of illustration by Steven Cummings, and the adaptation by Grayson. Shakespeare would be proud.

Tim Lasiuta

In Uglyville humans are ugly until their sixteenth birthday. At that time they must choose to become a Pretty and enjoy the fruits of society or remain as they are. Most opt for the Surge to change them into a Pretty as the materialistic hedonism of obedience supersedes toiling as an Ugly.

As Shay nears her landmark birthday, she looks forward to transforming into a Pretty; as does her friend Tally. Both are daredevil risk takers tampering with their hoverboard safety mechanisms. After a crash landing, Shay meets Zane known as Stretch. She says her friends call her "Skinny". He tells her he plans to go out not up as she did. Shay thinks he means the burbs with the middle Pretties, but he says beyond the grid. Stretch introduces Skinny to the skeptical teen Crims who question anything society claims as fact. Feeling an affinity with the Crims, as her sixteenth birthday nears; she must decide between Shay the Pretty in the city or Skinny the Ugly in the wilderness.

Fans of Tally's saga sees the story from Shay's perspective in this terrific graphic book that captures the same values questions of what rights a citizen has to say no to a society demanding conformity. The storyline is fast-paced with illustrations enhancing the action. Readers will appreciate Shay's choice in a society that demands compliance in exchange for a life of "pleasure". Though targeting middle school children, the entertaining storyline will remind readers of commentary by Dylan Ratigan (see Greedy Bastards) and Charles J. Sykes (see A Nation of Moochers: America's Addiction to Getting Something for Nothing) though Shay insists there is a price to pay.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
Really gives you a new perspective to an old character. 25 Jun. 2012
By lissethT - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
I really liked this graphic novel a lot. I thought it was going to be disappointed in the way the characters were brought to life. But I wasn't! I really liked the artist's rendition and consideration of detail.There is even a section in the back where it shows you the rough sketches & revisions made to the characters. I loved the Uglies series by Scott Westerfeld & was so excited when I heard this book was coming out, through Shay's POV.

I really liked that we got a whole new look at Shay & her part of the story in the uglies series. I really felt for her, with David drama, Smokie betrays, and herself. It brought new insight at Shay the person. We see her grow & rebel & be herself. I was really rooting for her, I know a lot of people see her as evil or as antagonistic character, But all I see is a girl that just never wanted to be alone. Which we see she is and that leads her to Tally, and if you read Uglies then you know what happens next.

The only thing that bothered me AT ALL was that Ugly Zane has light hair, whose color is never mentioned. Then Pretty Zane has dark hair. That totally confused me. I mean, i liked both Zane's but would have loved consistency.

There were a bunch of other characters like Ho, Croy, Astrix, and Tach. Really liked seeing them too! We also got a look at the Smoke and the infamous Dr. Cable, who did look scary! 0_o Tally was in there too, but not that much, more to the end really. Loved the ending and CAN NOT WAIT FOR THE NEXT ONE!!

Overall I loved it. It was a AMAZING! I enjoyed it a lot, YOU HAVE TO READ IT & UGLIES! Giving it a 5/5 stars!
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