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UNSHED TEARS Kindle Edition

4.8 out of 5 stars 60 customer reviews

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Length: 482 pages Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled

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Product Description

About the Author

Edith Hofmann is a survivor of the Holocaust, born in Prague in 1927 as Edith Birkin. In 1941, along with her parents, she was deported to the Lodz Ghetto, where within a year both her parents had died. At 15 she was left to fend for herself. The Lodz Ghetto was the second-largest ghetto to Warsaw, and was established for Jews and Gypsies in German-occupied Poland. Situated in the town of Lodz in Poland and originally intended as a temporary gathering point for Jews, the ghetto was transformed into a major industrial centre, providing much needed supplies for Nazi Germany and especially for the German Army. Because of its remarkable productivity, the ghetto managed to survive until August 1944, when the remaining population, including Edith, was transported to Auschwitz and Chelmno extermination camp in cattle trucks. It was the last ghetto in Poland to be liquidated due to the advancing Russian army. Edith was only 17, and one of the lucky ones. For the majority, it was their final journey. A small group of them were selected for work. With her hair shaved off and deprived of all her possessions, she travelled to Kristianstadt, a labour camp in Silesia, to work in an underground munitions factory. In January 1945, aged 18 and with the Russians approaching again, she was sent off on a death march across snow-covered Germany to Bavaria. There cattle trucks were waiting. After spending a week in crowded conditions without food or water she and her companions arrived in Bergen Belsen on 15th March 1945. A month later they were liberated. In 1946, after the liberation and destruction of the death camps, she came to England to study, eventually becoming a teacher in London. Edith has written 2 books about her experiences, Unshed Tears, a novel and The Last Goodbye, a book of poems and pictures. Edith now lives with her husband in Hereford. She has three children and six grandchildren.

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 695 KB
  • Print Length: 482 pages
  • Page Numbers Source ISBN: 1908223901
  • Simultaneous Device Usage: Unlimited
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B0073WEQCG
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Not Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars 60 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #261,567 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5 stars
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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This extraordinary book moved me,a somewhat cynical 49 year old male, to tears. Several times.

Edith Hofmann wrote this book when she was 19, just a few years after the war. At the time she was told no-one would want to read it as no-one was interested in the war any more. So she put her book away in a drawer and there it languished for 50 years.

It's written in third person, as a novel, because she was frightened for her safety. But that in no way reduces its impact and it's clear all along that she writes from (recent) personal experience.

She wrote in English, and as she had been studying the language for just two years her writing is, to begin with at least, rather awkward. But her story soon absorbs the reader and minor issues of grammar or syntax quickly become irrelevant.

Whatever I expected of this book, I did not expect a love story. That's only part of the book, and in page number terms only a small part, but it's clear that had Edith not met him, and had his faith in her not restored her faith in herself, she would probably not have survived.

What moves me the most is the sense of hope that fills the book, faltering only occasionally and then only at the darkest of moments and only briefly. This is what makes the book so inspiring.

For me, Edith Hofmann's book is on a par with Anne Frank's diary. It's different, not least because Anne Frank's diary does not include the time she spent in the concentration camps whereas Edith Hofmann's book does, in graphic and sometimes difficult-to -read detail. Anne Frank's diary is on many people's must-read list. So too should be Edith Hofmann's moving and extraordinary book.

Highly recommended.
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Format: Kindle Edition
Unshed Tears is an amazing tale of a girl's survival of the Holocaust. It is intense and harrowing, but ultimately inspiring and full of hope.
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Format: Kindle Edition
This is an easy book to read but at times quite harrowing. The love story is unexpected and hope shines throughout the book. This is the true story of the holocaust. Buckets of tears were shed whilst resading this book.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
The story centres around Judith, a young Jewish girl and her experiences through the second world war.

This is a brilliant book that really brings home what life was like during the war. Although there is a lot of tragedy throughout the book there is also an underlying message of hope and perseverance.

My only criticism is that it doesn't seem to have been formatted for the kindle properly and there were a lot of instances where the space between words had been missed out.

Apart from that it's a brilliant read.
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The workds "amazing" do no justice to this story. Thank you for sharing such a personal and tragic story, its something I shall never forget (and something that must never be forgotten). It is a must read for anyone that needs reminding just how lucky we are now days.
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loved it, loved it, loved it, this book moved me to tears as many of the holocaust books have done in the past,made me laugh and filled me with admiration for this young girl, even though its style was rather simplistic it completely drew me in and made the whole story come to life. To read of an account like this from ghetto to concentration camp through to liberation just made me want to know more of judiths life after the war had ended, all written by a 19 year old girl amazing .i would highly recommend this , only critiscism was the kindle format was jumpy and had spaces which was annoying as it spoiled the flow of reading.
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I have recently read another book by a holocaust survivor - told by the lady when she is in her later years (Rena's Promise -two sisters in Auschwitz), which I found profoundly moving, so looked forward to reading this one .

This book is an amazing feat, written by a girl of 19, whose first language is not English (but this never shows -her command of the language is superb)and written soon after her experiences.

'Judith' (the book is written in the third person, though obviously the author's biography) and her family are taken from their comfortable home in Prague, and transported by cattle trains to the Jewish ghetto in Lodz in Poland. Here they live in increasing poverty and despondancy until both of her parents sucuumb to the degradation and lack of food and health care.

Her mother was prone to depression from the outset and after her death, Judith also falls victim to it for several months. She is gradually lifted out of her mental state by a Jewish man, Michael, many years her senior who is greatly respected in the community. Judith moves in with him and a love story of great beauty and innocence commences. It gives them both the strength to survive the hunger, thirst and insanitary conditions in which they live.

Judith , along with most of the ghetto is finally transported to Germany and forced to part from her beloved Michael. She continues her journey alone, joining up with various women and has incredible inner strength that takes her from Auschwitz to a labour camp deep in Germany and finally a long, long march led by elderly German officers who are trying to get them away from the advancing allies. Many die from hunger, thirst, being shot and just plain exhaustion, but Judith survives. The war is almost at an end.
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