Start reading ULYSSES (illustrated, complete and unexpurgated) on your Kindle in under a minute. Don't have a Kindle? Get your Kindle here or start reading now with a free Kindle Reading App.

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

 
 
 

Try it free

Sample the beginning of this book for free

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

Sorry, this item is not available in
Image not available for
Colour:
Image not available
 

ULYSSES (illustrated, complete and unexpurgated) [Kindle Edition]

James Joyce
3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (11 customer reviews)

Print List Price: £11.99
Kindle Price: £1.99 includes VAT* & free wireless delivery via Amazon Whispernet
You Save: £10.00 (83%)
* Unlike print books, digital books are subject to VAT.

Free Kindle Reading App Anybody can read Kindle books—even without a Kindle device—with the FREE Kindle app for smartphones, tablets and computers.

To get the free app, enter your e-mail address or mobile phone number.

Formats

Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition £0.99  
Kindle Edition, 14 Jan. 2014 £1.99  
Hardcover £16.99  
Paperback £11.99  
Kindle Delivers Sign-up to receive email updates and get a Free Kindle Book

Book Description

The Definitive Edition of ULYSSES
-illustrated with beautiful period images
-complete and unabridged version of the original text
-formatted for kindle to improve your reading experience
-linked table of contents to reach your chapter quickly

“NUMBER 1 in Modern Library’s 100 Best Novels of the 20th Century”

“Ulysses is the most important contribution that has been made to fictional literature in the twentieth century.” New York Times

‘Ulysses is perhaps the most written about book ever after the Bible, which should tell you something. It's definitely a better read.’ The Economist

"In the last pages of the book, Joyce soars to such rhapsodies of beauty as have probably never been equaled in English prose fiction." Edmund Wilson, The New Republic

UYLSSES is James Joyce’s astonishing masterpiece, one of the greatest works of the 20th Century, presented here in a specially designed edition for your kindle. A book of amazing energy, it is at times bawdy, funny, moving, and like life rich in complexity and detail.

Banned for obscenity in 1921, you can now read Ulysses in this complete and expurgated edition and decide for yourself.


Product Description

Amazon.co.uk Review

Ulysses has been labelled dirty, blasphemous and unreadable. In a famous 1933 court decision, Judge John M. Woolsey declared it an emetic book--although he found it not quite obscene enough to disallow its importation into the United States--and Virginia Woolf was moved to decry James Joyce's "cloacal obsession". None of these descriptions, however, do the slightest justice to the novel. To this day it remains the modernist masterpiece, in which the author takes both Celtic lyricism and vulgarity to splendid extremes. It is funny, sorrowful, and even (in its own way) suspenseful. And despite the exegetical industry that has sprung up in the last 75 years, Ulysses is also a compulsively readable book. Even the verbal vaudeville of the final chapters can be navigated with relative ease, as long as you're willing to be buffeted, tickled, challenged and (occasionally) vexed by Joyce's astonishing command of the English language.

Among other things, a novel is simply a long story, and the first question about any story is "What happens?" In the case of Ulysses, the answer could be "Everything". William Blake, one of literature's sublime myopics, saw the universe in a grain of sand. Joyce saw it in Dublin, Ireland, on June 16, 1904, a day distinguished by its utter normality. Two characters, Stephen Dedalus and Leopold Bloom, go about their separate business, crossing paths with a gallery of inforgettable Dubliners. We watch them teach, eat, loiter, argue and (in Bloom's case) masturbate. And thanks to the book's stream- of-consciousness technique--which suggests no mere stream but an impossibly deep, swift-running river-- we're privy to their thoughts, emotions and memories. The result? Almost every variety of human experience is crammed into the accordion-folds of a single day, which makes Ulysses not just an experimental work but the very last word in realism.

Both characters add their glorious intonations to the music of Joyce's prose. Dedalus's accent--that of a freelance aesthetician, who dabbles here and there in what we might call "Early Yeats Lite"-- will be familiar to readers of Portrait of an Artist As a Young Man. But Bloom's wistful sensualism (and naïve curiosity) is something else entirely. Seen through his eyes, a rundown corner of a Dublin graveyard is a figure for hope and hopelessness, mortality and dogged survival: "Mr Bloom walked unheeded along his grove by saddened angels, crosses, broken pillars, family vaults, stone hopes praying with upcast eyes, old Ireland's hearts and hands. More sensible to spend the money on some charity for the living. Pray for the repose of the soul of. Does anybody really?" --James Marcus

Amazon Review

Ulysses has been labelled dirty, blasphemous and unreadable. In a famous 1933 court decision, Judge John M. Woolsey declared it an emetic book--although he found it not quite obscene enough to disallow its importation into the United States--and Virginia Woolf was moved to decry James Joyce's "cloacal obsession". None of these descriptions, however, do the slightest justice to the novel. To this day it remains the modernist masterpiece, in which the author takes both Celtic lyricism and vulgarity to splendid extremes. It is funny, sorrowful, and even (in its own way) suspenseful. And despite the exegetical industry that has sprung up in the last 75 years, Ulysses is also a compulsively readable book. Even the verbal vaudeville of the final chapters can be navigated with relative ease, as long as you're willing to be buffeted, tickled, challenged and (occasionally) vexed by Joyce's astonishing command of the English language.

Among other things, a novel is simply a long story, and the first question about any story is "What happens?" In the case of Ulysses, the answer could be "Everything". William Blake, one of literature's sublime myopics, saw the universe in a grain of sand. Joyce saw it in Dublin, Ireland, on June 16, 1904, a day distinguished by its utter normality. Two characters, Stephen Dedalus and Leopold Bloom, go about their separate business, crossing paths with a gallery of inforgettable Dubliners. We watch them teach, eat, loiter, argue and (in Bloom's case) masturbate. And thanks to the book's stream- of-consciousness technique--which suggests no mere stream but an impossibly deep, swift-running river-- we're privy to their thoughts, emotions and memories. The result? Almost every variety of human experience is crammed into the accordion-folds of a single day, which makes Ulysses not just an experimental work but the very last word in realism.

Both characters add their glorious intonations to the music of Joyce's prose. Dedalus's accent--that of a freelance aesthetician, who dabbles here and there in what we might call "Early Yeats Lite"-- will be familiar to readers of Portrait of an Artist As a Young Man. But Bloom's wistful sensualism (and naïve curiosity) is something else entirely. Seen through his eyes, a rundown corner of a Dublin graveyard is a figure for hope and hopelessness, mortality and dogged survival: "Mr Bloom walked unheeded along his grove by saddened angels, crosses, broken pillars, family vaults, stone hopes praying with upcast eyes, old Ireland's hearts and hands. More sensible to spend the money on some charity for the living. Pray for the repose of the soul of. Does anybody really?" --James Marcus


Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 1938 KB
  • Print Length: 818 pages
  • Page Numbers Source ISBN: 0679722769
  • Publisher: Classic Fiction of James Joyce; First edition (14 Jan. 2014)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B00CSW9ER8
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Not Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (11 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #187,069 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
  •  Would you like to give feedback on images?


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?


Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars you get what you pay for 22 Jun. 2014
Format:Kindle Edition|Verified Purchase
You will never master this difficult book using this edition, which is the raw text without even the author's chapter divisions.
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Greatest novel of 20th Century? 16 May 2013
By Jak
Format:Kindle Edition
Is this extraordinary novel by James Joyce the greatest novel of the 20th Century (as many polls have indicated and many reviewers claimed)? Or is it, as some critics say, all style without substance, all sizzle without any steak? Make up your own mind by reading this well formatted and beautifully illustrated edition. I think it's worth the trouble (even though, I must confess, I sometimes find Joyce difficult reading) just to find and relish phrases like the one quoted by another reviewer (Lecancan): "The sea, the snotgreen sea, the scrotumtightening sea."

Beat that!
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Pure genius. 16 May 2013
Format:Kindle Edition
Haven't finished it yet but this book is sheer class: "The sea, the snotgreen sea, the scrotumtightening sea." Pretty smart edition too, very pleased with the download.
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
5.0 out of 5 stars Streaming and dreaming 24 Oct. 2014
By MD
Format:Kindle Edition|Verified Purchase
I've reached 19% on my Kindle, so it's a big book! Some say it's impenetrable but so far it strikes me as a poem interrupted by a story... of sorts. You have to go with the flow and throw yourself into the stream as it were. Beautiful writing, words abound, using the Kindle dictionary all over the place and Latin pops up everywhere, but it's a joy - like a wonderful dream.
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
5.0 out of 5 stars Satisfying depth of character 5 Jun. 2014
Format:Kindle Edition
Rightfully a classic. Joyce's style is inimitable and his use of internal monologue is singularly good in so far as it brings the character right into our living rooms. There is no concession to false sentiment and although his occasional relaxed use of punctuation can occasionally find the reader re-reading a passage, this somehow helps to focus on the acuity of Joyce's shaping of character.
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
5.0 out of 5 stars Best in show 16 May 2013
By bsms585
Format:Kindle Edition
Here it is the great classic, and I don't really think I can say anything that others haven't said already. It suffices for me to say, go out and read it here on Kindle.
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
Would you like to see more reviews about this item?
Were these reviews helpful?   Let us know

Customer Discussions

This product's forum
Discussion Replies Latest Post
No discussions yet

Ask questions, Share opinions, Gain insight
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in
 

Search Customer Discussions
Search all Amazon discussions
   


Look for similar items by category