Tyrannosaur 2011

Amazon Instant Video

(140) IMDb 7.6/10
Available in HD

Widower Joseph is crippled by his volatile temper and anger. He meets Hannah, a Christian worker at a charity shop. When they're brought together she seems to be his saviour, someone who can temper his fury and offer him kindness. But Hannah's secrets are revealed with devastating results on both their lives.

Starring:
Peter Mullan, Eddie Marsan
Runtime:
1 hour 28 minutes

Available in HD on supported devices

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Tyrannosaur

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Product Details

Genres Drama
Director Paddy Considine
Starring Peter Mullan, Eddie Marsan
Supporting actors Olivia Colman, Ned Dennehy, Sian Breckin, Paul Popplewell, Julia Mallam, Sally Carman, Lee Rufford, Paul Conway
Studio Studiocanal
BBFC rating Suitable for 18 years and over
Rental rights 48 hour viewing period. Details
Purchase rights Stream instantly and download to 2 locations Details
Format Amazon Instant Video (streaming online video and digital download)

Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

56 of 60 people found the following review helpful By tigerthedog on 9 Dec 2011
Format: DVD
TYRANNOSAUR
(dir. Paddy Considine/91 minutes)

Paddy Considine's directorial debut was the big winner at last week's British Independent Film Awards, picking up trophies for Best Director, Best Actress and Best Film. And rightly so. It's a remarkable film about beasts and monsters that pulls no punches. It's unrelentingly unpleasant; one (graphic) scene towards the beginning drew a collective gasp of horror from the audience in the cinema. It tells the story of `tyrannosaur' Joseph, characteristically played with blistering rage by Peter Mullan. Joseph is a violent, bitter, alcoholic widower, full of anger and pain. He meets Hannah (a stunning performance by Olivia Coleman), an all-round good egg (she's a devout Christian working in a charity shop, what more proof do you need that she's a good person?) who takes Joseph under her wing and helps him on the road to recovery and redemption. It all sounds a bit predictable written down on the page like that, but the execution is far from predictable as Hannah is hiding something equally terrible about her own life. All the performances are standout (Eddie Marsan makes a distinct impression in his limited screen time as Hannah's monstrous husband James). Casting Coleman, primarily known as a comedy actress in Peep Show, Rev and Green Wing among others, was a masterstroke as she's so warm and nice that you just want to give her a hug. She'll break your heart. That's a promise.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Victor HALL OF FAMETOP 50 REVIEWER on 2 Aug 2012
Format: DVD
This is a gritty slice of noirish realism from first time director (but a familiar face in front of the camera) Paddy Considine. It tells the story of Jacob (Peter Mullan) a man for whome life has been one long misery, full of violence, alcohol and deprivation. A chance meeting with Hannah (for whome life appears at first to be perfect) might just lift some of the darkness and bring a little light into his life. But as ever, it is going to be a struggle.

This is a story of damaged people trying to find their way through the world. It shows how you shouldn't just take people at face value, and how there can be a lot more going on behind the scenes than you realise. It deals with domestic violence of a variety of shades, and with mental illness. It is not a fun film to watch, but it is very worthwhile and moving.

Impressive performances from the cast, especially Olivia Coleman (hitherto only known to me as a sidekick to Mitchell and Webb), bring Paddy Considine's dark vision to life. Peter Mullan as the moody Jacob is impressive, seeming to burst from the screen when enraged, as though the television is not big enough to hold all of his anger. I felt threatened by his presence at times, even through the separation of the film camera. Olivia Coleman brings strength and dignity to her role as her relationship with Jacob evolves, managing to show how she takes inspiration from his anger and violence to deal with her own problems.

It's tough and gritty, but I felt that these were real people dealing with real problems, and I have to say it was an impressive debut for Considine the director. 5 stars.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By PP Prong on 5 Jun 2012
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
I sort of knew that if Paddy Considine made a film it would be like this. Hard drinking gamblers and fighters. Tattooed, benefit dependent thugs with baseball bats and weapon dogs. Random racism and calculated GBH. Neglected children bearing witness to adult trails of dysfunction and destruction. Lost souls reaching for lost souls in a land of the soulless. A funeral, a wake, a coming together. There's no doubt this is a good film. Olivia Colman is just beautiful as the cross-wearing, alcoholic charity shop worker; Eddie Marsan is his usual fathomless, weird-headed menace; and Peter Mullan does admirably what the hard man role asks of him. Paddy was never going to have a musical, or a costume drama or a stab at Shakespeare as his directorial debut so should I be surprised that this is what it is? Probably not. Is art, because it supposedly imitates life, a perpetual re-affirmation of a community of stereotypes? Possibly. And although there's nothing wrong with drawing truth from what you know I could have done with some more shade and colour in the narrative and a little less immersion in the world of the depressed underclass. If that meant an extra fifteen minutes on the length it would have been worth it as I thought the film was a bit too short.

`Tyrannosaur' might bear comparison with Samantha Morton's 2009 directorial debut 'Unloved'. In some ways their directors' biogs are similar - an East Midlands origin, falling into acting through non-traditional routes, working class upbringings - but whereas Moreton's film about a little girl's experience growing up in care is both bleak and beautiful Considine's is just bleak. Despite the stylistic - and gender - differences both films seem to go to similar places; buy both and view them as a pair.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Mr. B. R. Good VINE VOICE on 21 Feb 2012
Format: DVD Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
With a small, talented cast, this film was written and directed by a man who had been under my radar for ages - Paddy Considine. I first discovered him as the lead in Shane Meadows', 'A Room for Romeo Brass'.

The plot in a nutshell: An angry, disturbed alcoholic, alone since the death of his beloved wife roams from dole office to pub in a never ending cycle of aggression and confrontation. He discovers Hannah, a middle class, kind Christian lady, with a secret. She may live on the pleasant side of town but her life is a circle of physical and emotional abuse by her husband.

Tyrannosaur did not immediately capture my interest, however, as a testament to the quality of the writing and production, I reached then end without taking a break once. The story of Joseph a troubled alcoholic played by the excellent Peter Mullan, finds solace in a vulnerable Charity shop worker, played by the popular Olivia Coleman.

A slightly crass observation perhaps, but the usually attractive Olivia Coleman (actually 38) does not look a day under 45 in this film.

As the film gets going, we see an extremely familiar face of British realism/gritty drama, Eddie Marsan, a man who crops up in virtually ever British drama these days. For a good reason, he is a superb character actor. He plays James, the violent, repulsive husband to Coleman's character Hannah.

It's a difficult watch because of the fact that real people are living these identical lives every day on any street or housing estate.

It was probably not necessary to include some of the scenes of animal abuse, it makes the film especially difficult to watch. The overwhelming theme that is woven into the fabric of the plot is about hopelessness, poverty and depression. Sad people living troubled lives.
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