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Lord Tyger (Grand Master Novels (Titan Books)) [Paperback]

Philip Josť Farmer
4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
RRP: £7.99
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Book Description

27 July 2012 Grand Master Novels (Titan Books)
My Mother is an Ape. My Father is God. I come from the Land of Ghosts."" So sings Ras Tyger, Philip José Farmer's monumental incarnation of a modern-day Jungle Lord. Savage, heroic, and beautiful, he is master of the world. And he rules his kingdom with sex, savagery, and sublime innocence. Until one day, the insane reality of his existence begins to unfold...

Frequently Bought Together

Lord Tyger (Grand Master Novels (Titan Books)) + Time's Last Gift (Wold Newton Universe Novel) + A Feast Unknown (Secrets of the Nine #1) (Memoirs of Lord Grandrith) (Wold Newton)
Price For All Three: £19.46

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Product details

  • Paperback: 416 pages
  • Publisher: Titan Books (27 July 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 9780857689665
  • ISBN-13: 978-0857689665
  • ASIN: 0857689665
  • Product Dimensions: 20 x 13 x 3 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 513,078 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Product Description

Review

"[A] jolting conception, brought off with tremendous skill." --The Times

If you can set aside the time to read it, it s well worth a look. --Starburst

About the Author

Philip José Farmer was a multiple award-winning science fiction writer of 75 novels. He is best known for his Wold Newton and Riverworld series. In 2001 he was awarded the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America Grand Master Prize and a World Fantasy Lifetime Achievement Award. He passed away in 2009.

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Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
Format:Paperback
What Farmer has done here is to take a long, hard look at the scientific implausibility of Tarzan of the Apes, and what might happen if someone with unlimited resources should try to recreate the circumstances of Tarzan's jungle upbringing with a real baby. This novel is the story of one such baby. He isn't the first attempt of course. The first two fall foul of the impracticalities of Burroughs' original scenario very quickly and compromises have to be made.
We follow Ras Tyger from early boyhood to young adulthood, as Farmer takes all the situations imposed on him to their logical conclusions. Ras, of course, is not Tarzan. He proves this as soon as he reaches sexual maturity by having sex with just about any female he can pin down, much to the disgust of his 'parents' (actually a couple of little people, who are hired to guide him in the right direction, while pretending to be apes).
Even with all his power and money to bribe governments, eventually other people find the valley in which this insane ERB fan is conducting his grand experiment. Ras meets a mysterious yellow-haired 'angel' and begins to learn the truth. Farmer takes them on a wild adventure, full of danger and death, while never letting go of real-world logic. Victims who would be rescued in the average fantasy novel die and Ras Tyger is manipulated into murdering innocents.
Farmer, ever the joker, even manages to slip in a sly Wizard of Oz reference.
All-in all this is one of "Grand Master" Philip José Farmer's best books and is fully deserving of the epithet, "classic". This new edition also has an enjoyable introduction by Joe R. Lansdale and a new forward by Paul Spiteri.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars be aware - a bit perverse 18 Sep 2012
By lesley
Format:Paperback
very easy to read and imagine so must be well written. A good story. I am interested in woods and survival so that helped. It's based on Tarzan, but I won't tell you too much and spoil it for you. It reminded me a bit of Fifty Shades of Grey because, the tarzan character, his abuse of women is sometimes on a fine line because the women enjoy it once they get going, therefore suggesting that it was ok really. This is a man's fantasy which makes a change from reading womens' fantacies. I am interested to try another of his books.
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Amazon.com: 4.3 out of 5 stars  6 reviews
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars On the surface this may look like just another Edgar Rice Burroughs pastiche, but it isn't. 26 April 2013
By David L. Brzeski - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
What Farmer has done here is to take a long, hard look at the scientific implausibility of Tarzan of the Apes, and what might happen if someone with unlimited resources should try to recreate the circumstances of Tarzan's jungle upbringing with a real baby. This novel is the story of one such baby. He isn't the first attempt of course. The first two fall foul of the impracticalities of Burroughs' original scenario very quickly and compromises have to be made.
We follow Ras Tyger from early boyhood to young adulthood, as Farmer takes all the situations imposed on him to their logical conclusions. Ras, of course, is not Tarzan. He proves this as soon as he reaches sexual maturity by having sex with just about any female he can pin down, much to the disgust of his 'parents' (actually a couple of little people, who are hired to guide him in the right direction, while pretending to be apes).
Even with all his power and money to bribe governments, eventually other people find the valley in which this insane ERB fan is conducting his grand experiment. Ras meets a mysterious yellow-haired 'angel' and begins to learn the truth. Farmer takes them on a wild adventure, full of danger and death, while never letting go of real-world logic. Victims who would be rescued in the average fantasy novel die and Ras Tyger is manipulated into murdering innocents.
Farmer, ever the joker, even manages to slip in a sly Wizard of Oz reference.
All-in all this is one of "Grand Master" Philip José Farmer's best books and is fully deserving of the epithet, "classic". This new edition also has an enjoyable introduction by Joe R. Lansdale and a new forward by Paul Spiteri.
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A great reissue 2 Aug 2012
By Brad Mengel - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
"It's a gorgeous cover" I think as I get my copy - full credit to Titan books for such great package. Not only do we get a reprint of Lord Tyger but we also get an introduction by Joe Landsdale - the guy chosen to finish Edgar Rice Burrough's unfinished Tarzan novel and a foreword by Paul Spiteri, Philip Jose Farmer expert. These extras add so much to the book (This isn't limited to Lord Tyger, all of the Farmer reissues by Titan have great extras)

Lord Tyger was initially published in 1970. I last read it in about 1997 so this reread was almost like reading the book fresh.

Where do I start? Lord Tyger owes a debt to Edgar Rice Burroughs' Tarzan. Farmer reinvents Tarzan for the 1970s would be a simple pithy description of the book but Lord Tyger is more than an attempt to update the Tarzan archetype, it's Farmer's rumination on the whole Tarzan saga.

The title character Ras Tyger (Ras is Arabic for Lord) is the product of a madman's experiment to recreate Tarzan. Farmer brings his trademark realism to the story. Ras is the third attempt at this experiment. The first subject died, the second became intellectually impaired because real gorillas don't have a language. We see just how many concessions have to made to make Tarzan work in the "real" world.

Ras Tyger is raised by dwarves and not apes and he has to be tutored in reading and writing but Ras Tyger is a modern Tarzan. He is able to undertake feats that his inspiration would have undertaken, indeed the story of this novel would have been an exciting adventure for Tarzan.

Farmer is never one shy away from sexuality and Ras Tyger is quite sexually active, (not as graphically as his spiritual brother Lord James Cloamby The Tree Lord in A Feast Unknown due to be released be Titan also) but Farmer doesn't do this to for the sake of titillation but to show just how different a man like Ras Tyger would be from the so-called "civilized" man.

As I said Ras Tyger is the product of an experiment, one where concessions to reality had to be made. After Farmer establishes the world that Lord Tyger lives in, Farmer changes the rules and has an outsider discover the hidden valley where Ras Tyger lives. Landsdale in his introduction mentions that Farmer makes us follow the story asking "what happens next?" I was asking that question the whole way through this book and when I finished I was still asking what happens next.

Lord Tyger is a great adventure that explores the reality of the feral man and recreates it for the 1970s. I would recommend this book.
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Another brilliant take on the Tarzan mythos by a sci-fi master 4 Nov 2012
By Sean Levin - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
Fans of legendary science fiction author Philip José Farmer (the present reviewer's favorite author of all time) know that one of his favorite characters was John Clayton, Lord Greystoke; aka Tarzan of the Apes. Farmer used the jungle lord in a number of his works, the most famous of which was Tarzan Alive: A Definitive Biography of Lord Greystoke. This fictional biography was built on the premise that Tarzan was a real person whose true adventures and life were just embellished by Edgar Rice Burroughs. This book also introduced the concept of the Wold Newton Family, an interconnected family tree including Tarzan, Doc Savage, Sherlock Holmes, The Shadow, The Spider, The Avenger, Bulldog Drummond, A.J. Raffles, Professor Challenger, Nero Wolfe, Allan Quatermain, James Bond, Dr. Fu Manchu, and many others. Most of the Wold Newton Family can trace their remarkable qualities to their ancestors' exposure to a meteor that landed in the Yorkshire village of Wold Newton on December 13, 1795. (This incidentally, is a very real occurrence, upon which Farmer grafted his delightful and fascinating pretense). Farmer also wrote an authorized entry in the Tarzan series, The Dark Heart of Time: A Tarzan Novel. There are other appearances by the ape-man in Farmer's work as well, though few of them use the name "Tarzan" directly.

Recently, Titan Books has begun reprinting a number of classic works by Farmer. While many of these have been books that draw upon the Wold Newton mythos, Lord Tyger is the first entry in their "Grand Masters" series of Farmer reprints; featuring works that do not have explicit links to Farmer's Wold Newton writings. It features an excellent foreword by Paul Spiteri. Lord Tyger is one of Farmer's best takes on Burroughs' creation, and is justifiably considered by many of the groundbreaking author's fans to be one of his best works in general.

Ras Tyger, the protagonist of Farmer's novel, is as different from Tarzan as he is similar. While Tarzan's jungle upbringing was due to fate, Ras' was quite calculated. Both men had many questions about the beings they respectively called "God," but only Ras received any definitive answers. While Tarzan was fairly chaste prior to meeting his true love Jane Porter, Ras had an active libido, and did not let his sexual partners' race or species deter him. Indeed, there are some quite heated and extremely well written sexual passages in Farmer's novel, somewhat similar to his incredibly controversial novel A Feast Unknown (also reprinted by Titan) which featured a pastiche of Tarzan called Lord Grandith in battle with Doc Caliban, an obvious analogue of Doc Savage. However, these passages are not as ingrained in the plot of Lord Tyger as the similar scenes in A Feast Unknown, and thus the former has never quite achieved the notoriety of the latter. Of course, the fact that Lord Tyger was published by Doubleday, a "reputable" company while A Feast Unknown was originally put out by Essex House, a publisher of pornographic novels, may play a factor in the unfortunate stigma. In some ways, Farmer's novel is truer to the reality of what would happen if the child of British nobles grew up in the jungle, apart from so-called "civilization."

Ever since reading about the Wold Newton Family online led to me reading Tarzan Alive ten years ago, I have been amazed by the late, great Phillip José Farmer`s literary ingenuity. Lord Tyger is no exception to this rule of thumb. This realist take on one of Farmer's most beloved fictional heroes is fascinating, provocative, and unique. Like many of Farmer's legion of loyal fans, I am thrilled that Titan has made many of Farmer's best works widely available once more. It gives me great pleasure to grant this topnotch novel 5 stars!
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Lord Tyger 5 July 2013
By James Page III - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
I've been meaning to buy this book for some time now. I've read some of Mr. Farmer's other work, and his rearranging of certain aspects of pulp heroes' lives is interesting. I'd recommend this as a casual read.
4.0 out of 5 stars And to think the Burroughs estate sued over that Bo Derek movie... 21 Dec 2013
By Amazon Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Kindle Edition|Verified Purchase
I love Tarzan.
However...
This is a de-construction of it. And a D--- good one.

Imagine a very rich man having read too much Tarzan and deciding to create one himself, with all the questionable ethics and artificial situations that'd require...? And then the Tarzan being a good but not so 'noble' one?

He did even more in "A Feast Unknown" also brilliant, but this is way less gay at least.

In principal I despised the "Deconstructionist" stuff that appeared in the late 70s through the 80s onwards, bashing classic pulp heroes of old and the cliche good vs evil stuff. I like Farmer's writing, and I guess he just had to pay the rent and avoid being blacklisted like John Norman. But he did a good job at it and its interesting to explore things like this.
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