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Two Suns Extra tracks, NTSC, Special Edition


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Amazon's Bat for Lashes Store

Music

Image of album by Bat for Lashes

Photos

Image of Bat for Lashes

Videos

Exclusive Preview of the Making of the Two Suns

Biography

Bat For Lashes – aka Natasha Khan – releases the highly-anticipated third album, The Haunted Man, on October 15, 2012.

“Subtle, heartfelt and profoundly moving” The Independent
“Feelings of mortality abound, making it her own take on Scott Walker’s ‘Big Louise’, with a suggestion of Leonard Cohen’s ‘Hallelujah’” ... Read more in Amazon's Bat for Lashes Store

Visit Amazon's Bat for Lashes Store
for 7 albums, 17 photos, videos, discussions, and more.

Frequently Bought Together

Two Suns + Fur And Gold + The Haunted Man
Price For All Three: £47.33

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Product details

  • Audio CD (17 Nov 2009)
  • Number of Discs: 2
  • Format: Extra tracks, NTSC, Special Edition
  • Label: Parlophone (Wea)
  • ASIN: B002Q02FS2
  • Other Editions: Audio CD  |  Vinyl  |  MP3 Download
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (73 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 351,058 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Rafael Beijinho on 11 Jan 2010
Format: Audio CD
I came across Bat For Lashes when I went to see the Radiohead gig at London on the summer of 2008, and boy was I in for a surprise. After the gig, I started listening to the, by-then only album Fur and Gold. From tip to toe it was absolutely beautiful. Her lyrics are very deep and her voice is something of a kind. I imediately fell in love and now that I can afford it I bought both of her albums.

By the way, when I first listened to Two Suns I was kind of disappointed, but then I took my time and listened it a couple more times. It's great. And I believe Travelling Woman can be my favourite song of them all, although it's really hard to pick one. It's one (two!!) of those albums where you like each and every song. And that doesn't happen very often. For me, that I can remember right now, it only happens with... Radiohead!!

Plus, the DVD on the special edition is really a plus. Natasha is a very sweet girl, and you really understand more of her songs if you listen to her explanations. By the end of the DVD you really see the big picture. It was very nice, because sometimes we listen to an album and we don't go beyond the 11 or 12 songs, and there's so much more behind that. The DVD really is a glimpse into the creative mind of the artist.

Absolutely 5 star!

Oh, and once again, amazon service proved flawless!
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31 of 33 people found the following review helpful By jrhartley on 4 April 2009
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
This album is now available on Last FM at the moment and I urge you to go there and listen to it. To my mind, its a clear evolution from Fur and Gold - the primitive, tribal influences are still there, but the sound is more dancey, more electronic - it feels very early 1980s synth. However, whilst this early Eurythmics / Depeche Mode synth sounds seems to be all the rage, the lyrics are outstanding as ever from Natasha Khan, and, above all, the album seems to be permeated by a very zen, calm, perhaps even isolated, feeling. I understand from hearing and reading interviews about Two Suns that a lot of it was produced as Bat for Lashes travelled around on tour, and whereas Fur and Gold seemed to conjure up mental images of knights and maidens and Camelot, this album has a strong feeling about the mid West USA about it - National Parks, Canyons, wild nature.

In short - its as beautiful and haunting as you would expect from this wonderful artist. I urge you to catch her on tour - I was fortunate to see her at the secret show at the Wedgewood Rooms in Southsea recently and it was a tour de force. 10/10!
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Gannon on 17 April 2009
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
Let us get Kate Bush out of the way. Yes, Natasha Khan is a bit of an oddball and is prone to the occasional squeak or Tori Amos-like dalliance. However, neither of these girls served up an epic slice of druid pop-rock on a bed of Cure-d bass lines (`Glass'). 30 seconds in and she's off, whispering about `knights in shining armour' across dreamscapes of timeless but modern atmospherics. Her voice drifts across the bridge between the Cocteau Twins and sanity like an incoming mist.

However, it's not all good news. `Moon And Moon' is an unchallenging, if pretty, ballad. `Peace Of Mind' is harmonised banality that falls short of PJ Harvey. Elsewhere there is an over reliance on synthesised beats to induce and implore radio play. That said, it has worked a treat. `Daniel' is deceptively simple and wildly attainable because of it, despite whiffing of Fleetwood Mac. Her package is wrapped in a thin, but credible, alternative veil.

It's not all pop though. The back end of the album contorts into an introspective shuffle, far away from the heady, click-clack beats of earlier tracks. `The Big Sleep' even welcomes Scott Walker as operatic accompaniment for a poignant lament more in line with Antony Hegarty's `Daylight & The Sun' than with shimmering, pop-princess ambition.

Khan has grown in ambition with Two Suns. It is more adventurous and more polished. `Fur And Gold' was intriguing but not all it could be, Two Suns is a giant leap towards fulfilling her potential and an impressive achievement. However, like Björk, she should continue to evolve and shake off any shackles of expectation. We, the listener, should demand those next steps with urgency.
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16 of 17 people found the following review helpful By E. A Solinas HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWER on 13 April 2009
Format: Audio CD
It's like climbing a long velvet rope sewn with golden charms and jewels. That description sums up the experience of listening to Bat For Lashes (aka Natasha Khan), even in her lesser songs. And fortunately "Two Suns" doesn't really have any lesser songs -- just a steady stream of painfully exquisite, crystalline pop that focus on the feeling of love that's gone.

"In the street's broadways I seek... him whom my soul loveth," she sings softly in the introductory song, before switching to a mix of tribal drums and wafting keyboard. .

After that, she spreads out into a string of love songs -- in fact, this entire album is pretty heavy on those. Most are bittersweet descriptions of an affair falling apart ("I drove past true love once, in a dream/Like a house that caught fire, it burned and flamed"), but there are some beautifully idealistic moments as well.

Along the way, Khan dabbles in some stompy synthy dance, a hymnlike freak-folk ballad backed by a choir, and the warmly off-kilter "Traveling Woman," and a finale that evokes old wooden stages, toy pianos and an old theatre being shut down ("No more spotlights/coming down from heaven... and already my voice is fading/goodbye, my dears/and into the big city...").

Fortunately she doesn't abandon her signature sound, which is that of an old fantasy story mutating into a beautiful, slightly wicked dream -- swirling pop, haunting piano ballads, the soaring and unnerving echoes of "Siren" and its synth-studded companion "Pearl's Song," ethereal melodies swathed in shimmering keyboard, and the exotic sweet danciness of "Two Planets." But the absolute peak of the whole thing has to be "Daniel," an catchily effervescent ode to a man with a "flame in his heart.
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