or
Sign in to turn on 1-Click ordering.
More Buying Choices
The World Cinema Store Add to Cart
£5.99
Have one to sell? Sell yours here
Sorry, this item is not available in
Image not available for
Colour:
Image not available

 

Two In The Wave [DVD]

Jean-Luc Goddard , Francois Truffaut , Emmanuel Laurent    Exempt   DVD
3.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
Price: £6.01 & FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £10. Details
o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o
Only 3 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
Want it Monday, 28 July? Choose Express delivery at checkout. Details
Looking for Bargains?
Check out the DVD & Blu-ray Deals of the Week page to find this week's price-drops. Deals of the Week end on Sunday at 23:59.

LOVEFiLM By Post


Frequently Bought Together

Two In The Wave [DVD] + The Man Who Loved Women [DVD] + The Wild Child [DVD] [1970]
Price For All Three: £22.00

Buy the selected items together

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?


Product details

  • Actors: Jean-Luc Goddard, Francois Truffaut
  • Directors: Emmanuel Laurent
  • Format: PAL
  • Language: French
  • Subtitles: English
  • Region: Region 2 (This DVD may not be viewable outside Europe. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Classification: Exempt
  • Studio: New Wave Films
  • DVD Release Date: 11 April 2011
  • Run Time: 93 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B00450AGXW
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 76,275 in DVD & Blu-ray (See Top 100 in DVD & Blu-ray)

Reviews

Product Description

Two in the Wave is the story of a friendship and estrangement. Jean-Luc Godard was born in 1930; François Truffaut two years later. Love of movies brings them together. They write in the same magazines, Cahiers du Cinema and Arts. When the younger of the two becomes a filmmaker with The 400 Blows, which triumphs in Cannes in 1959, he helps his older friend shift to directing, offering him a screenplay which already has a title, A bout de souffle, or Breathless. Through the 1960s the two loyally support each other. History and politics separate them in 1968 and afterwards - when Godard plunges into radical politics but Truffaut continues his career as before. Between the two of them, the actor Jean-Pierre Léaud is torn like a child caught between two separated and warring parents. Their friendship and their break-up embody the story of French cinema. Exploring the letters, personal archives and films of the two New Wave directors, Two in the Wave takes us back to a prodigious decade that transformed the world of cinema.

Product Description

United Kingdom released, PAL/Region 2 DVD: LANGUAGES: French ( Dolby Digital 2.0 ), English ( Subtitles ), SPECIAL FEATURES: Black & White, Interactive Menu, Scene Access, SYNOPSIS: Two in the Wave is the story of a friendship and estrangement. Jean-Luc Godard was born in 1930; François Truffaut two years later. Love of movies brings them together. They write in the same magazines, Cahiers du Cinema and Arts. When the younger of the two becomes a filmmaker with The 400 Blows, which triumphs in Cannes in 1959, he helps his older friend shift to directing, offering him a screenplay which already has a title, A bout de souffle, or Breathless. Through the 1960s the two loyally support each other. History and politics separate them in 1968 and afterwards - when Godard plunges into radical politics but Truffaut continues his career as before. Between the two of them, the actor Jean-Pierre Léaud is torn like a child caught between two separated and warring parents. Their friendship and their break-up embody the story of French cinema. Exploring the letters, personal archives and films of the two New Wave directors, Two in the Wave takes us back to a prodigious decade that transformed the world of cinema. SCREENED/AWARDED AT: Cannes Film Festival, ...Two in the Wave ( Deux de la Vague ) ( Two in Nouvelle Vague: Godard and Truffaut (2 in the Wave) )

Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought


Customer Reviews

5 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
3.5 out of 5 stars
3.5 out of 5 stars
Most Helpful Customer Reviews
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars For Newcomers Only! 7 Jan 2012
Format:DVD
I have read extensively on the French New Wave cinema of the late 1950's, early 1960's and I consider Godard to be one of the greatest filmmakers of all time. Thus it was natural that I was attracted to this film. I can't really disagree with the sentiment of the previous reviewer, to be quite fair. I have, however, given the film 4 stars because of the content that it does contain. The interviews with both Godard and Truffaut, for example, as well as several behind the scenes moments from some of their great films from the period.

For somebody looking for a documentary which will provide an introduction to what the nouvelle vague and/or Godard and Truffaut was/were all about, this film will certainly satisfy. However, for anybody with a decent knowledge of the nouvelle vague will be left cursing a missed opportunity.
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
3 of 5 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Massive Failure 26 July 2011
Format:DVD
This film could have been great. Instead the director drowns the film in his own rhetoric, and turns one of the most amazing collaborations and spectacular fallouts in cinema history into some kind of teen novel-tabloid trash that was such a shame to watch.

Considering that both Alain Resnais, and more importantly Jacques Rivette are still around from the New Wave bunch (Rivette being with Cahiers as well) the film is some kind of Wednesday night special on some crap obscure satellite channel, that wastes such an amazing topic with paltry filmmaking skills and no kind of historical insight that you wonder why the French financiers didn't take it upon themselves to sack the directors arse of the film. Oh well.

It has some unique footage in it. But apart from that I'd avoid it.
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 3.7 out of 5 stars  3 reviews
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars so much context 12 April 2011
By Fred Zappa - Published on Amazon.com
Format:DVD
As an American who's seen some films by each of these two revolutionaries (I'm especially fond of Godard's), I found this documentary about them, their movies, their relationship, and their times very informative. It's one of those things that, while it teaches me so much, also reminds of how much I still don't know. By that I mean, I can watch the films of Godard and Truffaut and believe that I appreciate and "get" them, including how they "changed French cinema forever." But then, how can I do that, really, without fully knowing the contexts in which the films were made? Or why their makers made them, and what they apparently meant to say with them? Since their work isn't faked fly-on-the-wall "realism," it's always doing something different. I can catch--understand, and feel--some of that difference, but their films can't speak honestly to me, as I think their makers generally meant them to do, unless I know much more than I do so far about the makers and their contexts.

"Two in the Wave" goes a long way in providing context (social, intellectual, political, journalistic, and more) and it makes me think that I should watch a Godard film, then watch this documentary again, then see a Truffaut film, and see this documentary again, then a Godard, and so on.

I do have two complaints--throughout much of this film, there's a woman flipping through magazines, especially Cahiers du Cinema (for which both G and T got their start, as very young film critics). I waited for an explanation of her presence, which never came, unless I missed it; she became distracting. I also found the effort to make something explicable and profound out of a sort of Fathers-and-Son relationship between G and T and the actor Jean-Pierre Leaud unconvincing; it seemed poorly thought out, and pasted together (though it was good to see Leaud's initial screen test). Also, at one point, the narrator (former Cahiers editor Antoine de Baecque) claims that 1968 student rioters created their riots in a way that imitated what they'd already seen in G and T films. While G and T do show us much about the insidious influences of film on life, that claim about the influence of their own films on life seemed like a stretch to me.

But then, I wasn't there, so who knows? Again, I lack context. I do appreciate the rest of the context supplied by this documentary, because it greatly helps in my ongoing effort to better appreciate the art of Godard and Truffaut.
3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars An intriguing portrait of a friendship, whose vicissitudes trace the rise and fall of the French New Wave 2 July 2011
By Nathan Andersen - Published on Amazon.com
Format:DVD
While the so-called French New Wave is a complex artistic and historical movement, with important precursors and wide-ranging influences, it was announced to the world by Francois Truffaut's The 400 Blows and Jean-Luc Godard's Breathless. They are, in fact, quite different, but both capture a youthful enthusiasm, a sense that cinema matters, and a willingness to deviate from traditional cinematic norms. Emmanuel Laurent's engaging documentary explores the rise and fall of the French New Wave through the lens of a longstanding friendship between the directors of these two films, that soured shortly after the political protests in France of 1968.

The approach of the documentary is to reflect upon this friendship without narration, but only using the recorded and written words of Godard and Truffaut and many of their contemporaries, illustrating these words with newspaper stories, documentary footage, and sequences from a wide range of films. While Truffaut made the first feature film of the two, Godard followed shortly (and it was Truffaut's promise to the producers that he would take over in the event Godard had difficulties that sealed the deal). Their films were quite different, insofar as Truffaut tended to create fairly traditional narratives that were given a new vitality by means of the subject matter and experimental techniques. Godard, by contrast, tended to create films that directly commented on and challenged traditional forms. In spite of their differences, both were ardent supporters of each other's work, until the events of 1968 led Godard to consider that in spite of their novelty the films he and his colleagues had made remained complicit with the existing political orders and needed to become radical. The split between the two is rendered especially poignant here by the film's focus on the split allegiance of Jean-Pierre Leaud, who was Truffaut's discovery in The 400 Blows but starred in several films by both directors. One inspired aspect of the documentary is to show that even prior to their famous break, Truffaut and Godard were already engaged in a kind of tacit argument by the uses to which they put Leaud in their films, and in the dialogue they had him speak.

While the film does manage to avoid importing a narrator, using films and images and contemporary documentary footage to tell the story, it does incorporate a silent narrator, in the form of a young woman who served as research assistant, and who is shown engaged in the research that gives shape to the account explored in the film. Like another reviewer, I found her inclusion to be something of a distraction, and an odd choice, but it struck me that the point of it was to suggest something of the self-reflexive dimension that tended to characterize the work of the New Wave filmmakers. She also appears to stand in for the youthfulness and enthusiasm that produced these films in the first place - in an effort to counter the sense of the New Wave as of merely historical interest, to suggest that it could still inspire young people, as Godard and Truffaut were inspired by the work of the filmmakers they grew up on. In an interview between Godard and Fritz Lang, Godard mentions that he is struck that in the work of the filmmakers he admires most, even as they age, there is a spirit of youthfulness, of seeing everything with a fresh eye, and that this youthfulness is essential to cinema. While it is not perhaps a perfect documentary, "Two in the Wave" does capture some of that youthful spirit, and at the same time illuminates some of the tensions of a complex movement and a complex friendship. Lovers of cinema will not be disappointed.
1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Two in the Meh 24 July 2012
By Amaranth - Published on Amazon.com
Format:DVD
"Two in the Wave" promises a fascinating exploration of French Nouvelle Vague (New Wave) cinema. Sadly, it doesn't deliver. The French language manages to save this documentary from being a complete bore, because it's beautiful to listen to... otherwise, most of it consists of thoughtful young people reading newspapers and reading aloud from them. Jean-Luc Godard and Francois Truffaut went from being colleagues at Cahiers du Cinema, they had differing backgrounds- Godard grew up in relative wealth, while Truffaut dealt with the stigma of illegitimacy and feeling unwanted. In the end, the protests in 1968 would divide them.

"Two in the Wave" offers tastes of Godard and Truffaut's works, from Truffaut's The 400 Blows (The Criterion Collection) that was inspired by his childhood, to Godard's Breathless (The Criterion Collection) that introduced Jean Seberg to the world. If anything, this documentary inspires people to explore these great cinematic masterworks. There's Godard's surreal Weekend with its famous tracking shot, and Truffaut's The Story of Adele H. starring the radiant Isabelle Adjani, which would find cinematic progeny in Francois Ozon's Angel, that also has a leading lady with a fantasy life.

"Two in the Wave" promises much, but it's boring. Better to ride the wave elsewhere.
Were these reviews helpful?   Let us know
Search Customer Reviews
Only search this product's reviews

Customer Discussions

This product's forum
Discussion Replies Latest Post
No discussions yet

Ask questions, Share opinions, Gain insight
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in
 

Search Customer Discussions
Search all Amazon discussions
   


Look for similar items by category


Feedback