Watch now

Twelve O'clock High [DVD] has been added to your Basket
+ £1.26 UK delivery
Used: Very Good | Details
Sold by zoverstocks
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Buy with confidence from a huge UK seller with over 3 million feedback ratings, all items despatched next day directly from the UK. All items are quality guaranteed.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon

Image Unavailable

Image not available for
Colour:
  • Twelve O'clock High [DVD]
  • Sorry, this item is not available in
  • Image not available
      

Twelve O'clock High [DVD]


Price: £12.21 & FREE Delivery in the UK. Details
Only 1 left in stock.
Sold by best_value_entertainment and Fulfilled by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
4 new from £10.95 10 used from £0.15 5 collectible from £5.50

Amazon Instant Video

Watch Twelve O'clock High instantly from £3.49 with Amazon Instant Video
Also available to rent on DVD from LOVEFiLM By Post
£12.21 & FREE Delivery in the UK. Details Only 1 left in stock. Sold by best_value_entertainment and Fulfilled by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.

Special Offers and Product Promotions


Frequently Bought Together

Twelve O'clock High [DVD] + Wing And A Prayer [DVD] + The Hunters [DVD] [1958]
Price For All Three: £21.69

Buy the selected items together

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?


Product details

  • Actors: Gregory Peck, Hugh Marlowe, Gary Merrill, Millard Mitchell, Dean Jagger
  • Directors: Henry King
  • Producers: Darryl Zanuck
  • Format: PAL
  • Region: Region 2 (This DVD may not be viewable outside Europe. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Classification: U
  • Studio: Twentieth Century Fox
  • DVD Release Date: 1 Aug. 2005
  • Run Time: 128 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (68 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B0009KKWE0
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 52,306 in DVD & Blu-ray (See Top 100 in DVD & Blu-ray)

Reviews

Product Description

Colonel Keith Davenport (Gary Merrill) is more of a friend than a commander to his men, a US bomber crew stationed in wartime Britain. After a series of dangerous missions, the pilots are living on their nerves and when Davenport is replaced by the callous General Savage (Gregory Peck), the latter's attempts to whip the crew into shape result in a deluge of requests for transfers. However, young Lieutenent Bishop (Robert Patten) rallies his fellow pilots, and soon they and Savage begin to develop a mutual respect.

From Amazon.co.uk

The war-time memories of surviving World War II bomber squadrons were still crystal clear when this acclaimed drama was released in 1949--one of the first post-war films out of Hollywood to treat the war on emotionally complex terms. Framed by a post-war prologue and epilogue and told as a flashback appreciation of war-time valour and teamwork, the film stars Gregory Peck in one of his finest performances as a callous general who assumes command of a bomber squadron based in England. At first, the new commander has little rapport with the 918th Bomber Group, whose loyalties still belong with their previous commander. As they continue to fly dangerous mission over Germany, however, the group and their new leader develop mutual respect and admiration, until the once-alienated commander feels that his men are part of a family--men whose bravery transcends the rigours of rigid discipline and by-the-book leadership. The film's now-classic climax, in which the general waits patiently for his squad to return to base--painfully aware that they may not return at all--is one of the most subtle yet emotionally intense scenes of any World War II drama. With Peck in the lead and Dean Jagger doing Oscar-winning work in a crucial supporting role, this was one of veteran director Henry King's proudest achievements, and it still packs a strong dramatic punch. --Jeff Shannon, Amazon.com --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

33 of 34 people found the following review helpful By Mujahid Amin on 7 Sept. 2002
Format: DVD
This is a truly memorable film - comprising of a memorable story, memorable acting by Gregory Peck and memorable economical directing. However, the most memorable aspect of this film is the way it allows the story to seize your attention and then hands over to Peck and others to ensure your emotions are enagaged to the final end. The end is about victories of the soul and spirit as well as of men and machines. The feel of the film brings to ones remembrance the times of grave peril endured by Britain in the early years of the war. In essence the story tells of the redemption of a US Bomber Squadron based in Britain in the early years of the war after a run of 'bad luck'. It also tells of the great sacrifices made in the journey to final victory. If you are after a memorable movie experience - make this film your next stop!!
2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
27 of 28 people found the following review helpful By Sir Bob on 13 Nov. 2006
Format: DVD
Written by two airmen who lived the story and made at a time before revisionists lost the plot, this film accurately portrays life for the airmen during the early part of the American daylight bombing campaign, initially over France and then the first raids over Germany. The characters and bomber group are all ficticious but the real people on whom they are based can easilly be identified by anyone with a reasonable knowledge of the history.

Technically the film is very accurate but with a few blunders : American scenary like a plank-built railway station and picket fences, several of the "enemy" fighters are actually Spitfires and P47's and some of the airplanes are B17G's instead of B17F's.

The acting varies from stiff to brilliant, with Peck delivering an oscar-worthy performance. Camera work and direction are very good.

On another level the film is an excellent study of military leadership methods and styles. It is also a basic lesson in warfare which the west seems to have forgotten in the 1950's.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
21 of 22 people found the following review helpful By N. R. Allfrey on 7 Sept. 2007
Format: DVD
Forget the war (there's no bloodshed), forget the action (that's limited), forget sex - the nearest we get is Gregory Peck's thigh and there is not a woman in the film! - what Darryl F Zanuck's masterpiece shows is the positive attributes of great leadership along with the challenges it faces. It also exposes the leader as a 'friend' as a weak and ultimately failing approach. This film was designed to show leadership in its toughest environment and it achieves this wonderfully - remember it's based on fact so it has relevance where many other films fall down (Braveheart, Jerry Maguire etc) which are so far removed from any origins they are no longer connected to achievable outcomes.

Watch the nuances of expression - with no music to mask these, they are raw and meaningful.

Some amazing one-liners 'I didn't ask you to ask me....' 'Spit it out, with the bark on...' etc

A must for any aspiring Leader! - watch it at least 3 times to start to fully appreciate its complexity and subtlety, with the lessons it holds.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Victor HALL OF FAMETOP 100 REVIEWER on 11 Jan. 2012
Format: DVD
Through the history of film there have been a few classic pairings of director and actor that have produced some out and out great films - Anthony Mann/James Stewart, John Huston/Humphrey Bogart, John Ford/John Wayne for example. I would humbly add Henry King/Gregory Peck to that list. Though (as far as I know) they only made three films together, The Gunfighter, Twelve O'Clock High and Bravados, all three stand as some of the best work in the canon of either man, and all three were great movies that had that extra something that set them apart from the herd.

Whereas The Gunfighter and The Bravados were Westerns, Twelve O'clock High sees the pair tackle a WW2 film. There are many types of war film - the boys own adventure sort (such as Where Eagles Dare), the shockingly viscerally realistic (Saving Private Ryan), and attempts to dramatise real events (The Longest Day, A Bridge Too Far). Generally I like them all in one way or another, but what really gets my interest are films that show the human cost of war, films that show how ordinary people are forced by circumstance to extraordinary acts, and the effect it has upon them. Films such as Cruel Sea, Dawn Patrol, and this fine effort.

Peck stars as the commander of an air force unit. The unit has been underperforming, and Peck believes this to be the fault of the commanding officer, who he replaces with himself. The film follows his efforts to bring the unit up to scratch, at first clashing with the men and eventually winning their respect. The constant pressure takes it's toll on him, until finally he breaks down, leading to the film's final moving and powerful scene as he waits for teh squadron to return from a particularly deadly mission.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Darth Maciek TOP 500 REVIEWER on 23 Sept. 2013
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
This is an extremely powerful, intelligent and BRILLIANT war film! Below, more of my impressions, with some SPOILERS.

USAAF air base Archbury in United Kingdom, autumn 1942. The 918th Bomb Group of USAAF, operating the B-17 Flying Fortress heavy bombers, one of the first American units to attack targets in Nazi-occupied Europe from British bases, attracts attention of allied high command for its repeated bad performances and especially very high losses. It is now known as "Bad Luck 918" and morale in it is low, even if its commanding officer, Colonel Davenport, is known for his courage under fire and also for the attention given to his men welfare. He is therefore still popular with his men. But the high command decides to sack him and replace him with Brigadier-General Frank Savage - a somehow extraordinary appointment, considering that Bomb Groups were usually not commanded by generals.

Savage (Gregory Peck) is a young and extremely vigorous general - he also quickly proves to be absolutely ruthless in restoring discipline and squeezing from his men everything they can give! He quickly becomes object of intense hatred and things will ultimately go very, very far between him and the men under his command... That takes care of about first eight minutes of the film, and I will say no more here.

The great quality of this particularly brilliant film, which got two Oscars in 1949, is due in large part to the men who wrote the novel "Twelve O'Clock High", published in 1948 and immediately adapted to the screen.

Ukrainian-Jewish immigrant Sy Bartlett (he was born Sacha Baraniev in Ukraine in 1901), was first a journalist before becoming a screenplay writer in the 30s.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews


Customer Discussions

This product's forum
Discussion Replies Latest Post
No discussions yet

Ask questions, Share opinions, Gain insight
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in
 

Search Customer Discussions
Search all Amazon discussions
   



Feedback