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Tutu (Deluxe) Deluxe Edition, Original recording remastered

4 customer reviews

Price: £14.61 & FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £20. Details
Includes FREE MP3 version of this album.
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Biography

by William Ruhlmann

Throughout a professional career lasting 50 years, Miles Davis played the trumpet in a lyrical, introspective, and melodic style, often employing a stemless Harmon mute to make his sound more personal and intimate. But if his approach to his instrument was constant, his approach to jazz was dazzlingly protean. To examine his career is to examine the history of jazz ... Read more in Amazon's Miles Davis Store

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Tutu (Deluxe) + Amandla
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Product details

  • Audio CD (23 May 2011)
  • Number of Discs: 2
  • Format: Deluxe Edition, Original recording remastered
  • Label: CLASSICAL
  • ASIN: B004WDPXN0
  • Other Editions: MP3 Download
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 110,784 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Listen to Samples and Buy MP3s

Songs from this album are available to purchase as MP3s. Click on "Buy MP3" or view the MP3 Album.
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                         

Samples
Song Title Time Price
  1. Tutu (Remastered Album Version) 5:17£0.89  Buy MP3 
  2. Tomaas (Remastered Album Version) 5:37£0.89  Buy MP3 
  3. Portia (Remastered Album Version) 6:18£0.89  Buy MP3 
  4. Splatch (Remastered Album Version) 4:45£0.89  Buy MP3 
  5. Backyard Ritual (Remastered Album Version) 4:50£0.89  Buy MP3 
  6. Perfect Way (Remastered Album Version) 4:36£0.89  Buy MP3 
  7. Don't Lose Your Mind (Remastered Album Version) 5:50£0.89  Buy MP3 
  8. Full Nelson (Remastered Album Version) 5:07£0.89  Buy MP3 
  9. Opening Medley ('Theme From Jack Johnson' / 'Speak' / That's What Happened') [Live From Nice Festival, France, July 1986]15:14Album Only
10. New Blues (Live From Nice Festival, France, July 1986) 5:20£0.89  Buy MP3 
11. The Maze (Live From Nice Festival, France, July 1986)10:15Album Only
12. Human Nature (Live From Nice Festival, France, July 1986) 9:04£0.89  Buy MP3 
13. Portia (Live From Nice Festival, France, July 1986) 7:54£0.89  Buy MP3 
14. Splatch (Live From Nice Festival, France, July 1986)17:10£0.89  Buy MP3 
15. Time After Time (Live From Nice Festival, France, July 1986) 7:22£0.89  Buy MP3 
16. Carnival Time (Live From Nice Festival, France, July 1986) 4:20£0.89  Buy MP3 

Product Description

Product Description

DAVIS MILES

BBC Review

Jazz’s most famous son is given godly status for his work in the 50s – as in Kind of Blue – and the 70s – as in Bitches Brew. The 80s remains a dubious period of his discography. Tutu casts doubt on that received wisdom. Although it is still dismissed by many as ‘lightweight’ or, worse still, ‘pop-fusion’, the album, whose striking monochrome sleeve stylized the trumpeter’s austere, sculptural, late-years beauty, had something that captured the imagination of many outside of the world of jazz.

And it wasn’t just the romance of Davis coming back to the fray, like some of the boxers from whom he drew inspiration, after several years on the ropes. If 1982’s We Want Miles was a clarion call for the idea that he was still relevant to music, specifically, and culture, generally, then 1986’s Tutu was proof positive that he could touch people without sounding dated. That was the whole point. The record reflected the 80s, just as Herbie’s Rockit did. That meant keyboards, sequencing, dub effects, drum machines and tonalities that often had the brightness and sharpness of the Fairlight era, something that is made all the more evident by the crisp sound of this re-issue.

Marcus Miller was the architect who built the sonic edifice for Davis, and the key thing was that he was a producer who could play as well as a player who could produce. Amid the tapestry of electronics, his bass guitar and bass clarinet make their presence felt, as does Michael Urbaniak’s electric violin, Paulinho Da Costa’s percussion, and Adam Holzman and Jason Miles’ synths. These elements cohere in backdrops that had strong echoes of black popular music of the day – Cameo’s sparkling, day-glow funk, Prince or Jam & Lewis’ fizzing electro-acoustic cocktails and, to a lesser degree, the angsty soul-reggae that Wally Badarou and Sly & Robbie laid down for Grace Jones. But Miller brought more crystalline harmonic subtleties to the table. Combined with Davis’ brooding brass whispers, the result was a work of engrossingly fraught atmospheres. And great tunes. None are light. Some are positively heavy.

--Kevin Le Gendre

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Customer Reviews

3.8 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

24 of 25 people found the following review helpful By J. MILLER on 3 Jun. 2011
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
This is at least the 3rd issue of 'Tutu', and sounds MUCH better than the original CD release. And to further tempt you into parting with your money yet again, the bonus is a very hot n'funky 76-minute live concert from Nice 1986, featuring Robben Ford's driving guitar. Which makes this a pretty darn good 2CD set.

The package includes comprehensive notes on the making of the album, by Ashley Kahn; the creation of 'Tutu' has been detailed in at least 2 books on Miles' electric period, so there is no need to go into that here. Suffice to say that it was Miles' 1st recording for Warner Bros, and completely eclipsed his last 2 or 3 albums for CBS. It was brilliant, dark, completely unexpected and futuristic at the time, and this is a superb-sounding re-issue; only the forthcoming SACD release could possibly sound any closer to the master recording.

Davis didn't really know how to write the pop-funk material he needed to play in order to appeal to the young, black audience he was desperate to reach. But he'd used Marcus Miller on bass in the '81-82 'comeback' band, who could and who by this time was also a genius producer - for David Sanborn, among others. And Miller knew - what to do, how to do it, realised this was a crucial point in both his and Miles' careers and that this recording had to deliver far beyond expectations. And he fulfilled that brief. It still sounds unique and completely different.

Nobody had thought that Davis would embrace the new technology so completely, and this album put him back in the forefront of innovation in that field in 1986. Some of the sounds - the opening orchestral stab, for instance - date the record, but within Miles' discography it is to the '80s what 'Bitches Brew' was to the '70s and 'Kind of Blue' was to the '50s, i.e.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By The Guardian TOP 50 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 18 July 2011
Format: Audio CD
`Tutu', released in 1986 was one of Miles' last works and defines his later, `electronic' period. Sometimes criticised for being more the work of the highly talented multi-instrumentalist Marcus Miller than of Miles himself in the same way that `Porgy and Bess' and `Sketches of Spain' might be seen as `Gil Evans Albums', nevertheless Miles' signature style and virtuoso trumpet playing define Tutu's principle character.

The history of this project is that Miles' new contract with Warner Brothers stipulated that all songwriting credits henceforth should belong to WB rather than to Miles himself. To get around this legal irritant Miller was hired to compose the main theme for each piece as a framework over which Miles could solo, and took all legal songwriting credit. You have to agree Miller did a good job: the resulting electronic rhythms and synth-dominant sound gives `Tutu' a distinctively 1980s feel which leads some to claim that Miles had `re-invented' jazz for the fourth or fifth time in his illustrious and multiply-groundbeaking career of continuous innovation. Well, that's stretching things a bit: `Tutu' is OK but hardly `great', in the same way `Do-Bop' is OK but not really a classic.

`Tutu' was certainly a new, fresh sound in 1986 and unlike anything else at the time which could be found under the `jazz' category. The album has a lot of energy and Miles' trumpet playing is as inventive and energetic as ever. However after several numbers it can begin to sound samey, and in the context of Davis' long career and particularly high-points such as `Kind of Blue,' `In a Silent Way' and `Bitches Brew', `Tutu' is justifiably seen by most (but not all) fans as a second-tier effort and not really one of his best works.
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2 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Mwaite on 9 July 2011
Format: MP3 Download
This album was my I pod soundtrack to a recent fantastic holiday to KOS, a departure from Miles Davis's expected style, however I loved it, particularly the guitar solos.
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0 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Numinous Ugo on 2 Feb. 2014
Format: Audio CD
This was one of the later albums I acquired from the Miles Davis catalogue. I loved the cover and the idea of a tribute to Desmond Tutu. I expected music to match that stature. What I got was bland 80's Pop. In a documentary I saw recently Marcus Miller talked about how the Jazz musicians who Miles got playing electric instruments looked uncomfortable playing them but that he was comfortable as it was where he came from. Here in lies the problem, that Miles himself should have recognised. He had previously pushed musicians way out of their comfort zone to get great performances out of them. He sack George Coleman (who should have been recognised as one of the great saxophonists of a new Miles Davis band) because he heard him practicing solos in his hotel room. Miles wanted spontaneity and practiced solos did not deliver that.

Marcus Miller's mechanical trudging arrangements do allow Miles some space for playing against but this album, and the one's released around this time, have aged very badly. I have dozens (literally) of Miles davis albums that I would listen to before getting this out again although here the live Deluxe Edition tracks do at least offer a slightly more rewarding listening experience.

I recommend that you buy this album only after you have almost everything from Birth of the Cool to Agharta. The best post-hiatus album is clearly Aura but I do have a soft spot for track High Speed Chase on Doo-Bop
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 2 reviews
6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
Just when you think you have it all!! 22 Sept. 2011
By Stephen Reddy - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
Just when you think you have it all, they release this! Listening to the remaster; you will realize Miles really hit the nail on the head with this album. The sound is excellent, forget about the other remasters out there, this is the best by far, plus you get the Live At The Nice Jazz Festival-1986 CD as well, you don't need a review of this to know you want it :)
3 of 8 people found the following review helpful
Excellent 26 Dec. 2011
By Marcelo Fraglioni - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
Excellent, thanks a lot! I really enjoy buy it!

Excellent, thanks a lot! I really enjoy buy it!

Excellent, thanks a lot! I really enjoy buy it!
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