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Turn Of The Tide

Turn Of The Tide

4 Feb 1992

£8.99 (VAT included if applicable)
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Product details

  • Original Release Date: 4 Feb 1992
  • Release Date: 4 Feb 1992
  • Label: Polydor Ltd.
  • Copyright: (C) 1981 Polydor Ltd. (UK)
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 48:27
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B001KWEZ9Y
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (12 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 74,309 in MP3 Albums (See Top 100 in MP3 Albums)

Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

25 of 25 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 2 Sep 2001
Format: Audio CD
BJH are most famous for a series of excellent 1970s albums, and the famous Berlin Concert for the People. However, Turn of the Tide ranks with their best work featuring some beautiful songs from both John Lees and Les Holroyd. The sound is very different to their earlier work, being less guitar driven, and although the subtle use of synthesiser works as a sort of replacement for the mellotron, that defining aspect of the bands traditional sound is missing. 'Life is for Living' is probably the best known track here and is typical of the bands well written, pop influenced 80s output, although other highlights include 'Back to the Wall', 'Death Of A City' and the moving 'In Memory of The Martyrs'. The normal BJH practice of including songs by Holroyd and Lees, with each singing their own, continues here and helps to provide variety throughout the album. Both are excellent singers with Holroyd offering a more high pitched (not quite Barry Gibb high) foil to Lees' mid range and suprisingly flexible voice and despite these differences there is a cohesive feel to the album which was rare in the 80s. If you enjoy modern bands like Mercury Rev or BJH contemporaries like The Moody Blues and Camel, this (and other BJH material) is well worth exploring, and I would suggest that 'Turn of the Tide' is a very accessible and enjoyable starting point for a journey that covers 20 albums plus live and rare material. Take the risk, and dip your toes into the work of one of Britain's greatest and most under rated bands.
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By alextorres on 23 Sep 2006
Format: Audio CD
"Turn of the Tide" is BJH's second album following the departure of founding member Woolly Wolstenholme in 1979. Woolly was one of three writers in the band, with leanings towards classical music, and had brought that influence to bear on BJH's sound, particularly on their first four albums. By 1981 the band had become a major act in Germany and other countries of continental Europe;. This significant commercial success had been launched on the softer, more MOR sound of the "Gone to Earth" album, as compared with their earlier material. The scale of this success was never matched in the UK and the band developed the sound in subsequent albums to build on this new market.

The album saw the band near the pinnacle of its fame: it sold over 250,000 copies in Germany and was no.1 in Switzerland. Despite the fact that the band never recaptured Woolly's unique keyboard sound following his departure, this album has, unquestionably, the BJH-hallmark sound. The songs are well crafted and the keyboard arrangements, provided by session musicians Kevin McAlea and Colin Browne, often provide the "texture" and feel that are unique to BJH.

The songs work well together to give the whole album a cohesive feel. As on all the best BJH albums, there is a good mix of styles: from the pacey, guitar-driven "Highway for Fools", through the jazzy-feel of "Back to the Wall" and syncopated "Doctor, Doctor" to the joyous, poppy "Life is for Living". My personal favourites are the luxurious "Echoes and Shadows" and "Death of a City", which is a revisit to the subject matter of "After the Day".

In summary, a fine album which has stood the test of time. It deserves to be re-released!
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By F. Jensen on 30 Jan 2013
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
I know that many BJH fans don't rate this album among their favorites, but to me it's a solid album. Further, it was my first BJH purchase (along with "Eyes of the Universe"), so I did not miss Woolly Wolstenholme's input (who had left the band a couple of years earlier). It's a bit heavy on 80s-sounding synths, particulary on the opener "Waiting on the Borderline" and the radio hit "Life Is For Living", but it also contains the beautiful ballads "How Do You Feel Now" and "I'm Like a Train", the solid rocker "Death of a City", the dreamy "Echoes and Shadows" and the moving "In Memory of the Martyrs" (a personal favourite). Highly recommended for fans of melodic, well-produced 80s pop/rock.
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Bought this for 'Life Is For Living' , having heard it on the radio. I absolutely love the track - and not a bad album at all.
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By Mr. Peter Steward TOP 1000 REVIEWER on 12 May 2014
Format: Audio CD
Another formula album that hasn't greatly stood the test of time. Les Holroyd's compositions are rather insipid and John Lees seems to have lost some of his sparkle in a series of mundane pieces. There are three saving graces to the album, however, with Life is For Living one of the band's best songs of the pseudo-pop era and Lees does come up with In Memory of the Martyrs which sees him at his poignant best in a hefty song with biting lyrics and the wonderfully romantic How Do You Feel Now - as good a song as ever written about a new baby. Elsewhere the album is sadly flat without a great deal of interest.
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A top quality album. Great. Took me back in time. Happy days and excellent music. Very well re-mastered. The sound quality is top-notch.
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