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The True Adventures of the Rolling Stones (Canons) Paperback – 12 Apr 2012


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Product details

  • Paperback: 576 pages
  • Publisher: Canongate Books; Main - Canons Imprint Re-issue edition (12 April 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0857863517
  • ISBN-13: 978-0857863515
  • Product Dimensions: 12.9 x 3.2 x 19.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (14 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 83,956 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Review

Stanley Booth's book is the only one I can read and say, 'Yeah, that's how it was'. (Keith Richards)

The one authentic masterpiece of rock 'n' roll writing.

If you've never bought a book about rock and roll, no matter - this is the one you've been waiting for. (Playboy)

The best book so far about the Sixties.

By far the best book on its subject (including Richards's own well received effort), Booth's book is also easily the most convincing account of life inside the monster created by the rock revolution of the 1960s. (Guardian 2012-04-07)

Stanley Booth's affection for the band did not keep him from writing about the seamy underside of the Stones' world in the Sixties . . . It is the only book about the Stones that I would recommend both to the general reader and to the most devoted fan. Both will find an epiphany on almost every page. (New York Review Times Book Review)

Shattering . . . Booth has found his voice and momentum with a pitch and passion I've never seen equalled in pop journalism. . . His book outdistances anything the Stones have wrought since Let It Bleed. (Los Angeles Herald Examiner)

' . . . remains one of the most gripping accounts ever written about the band . . . so awash with tumult and drama it at times has much in common with reportage from the front lines of the war in Vietnam, like Michael Herr's Dispatches. Booth alternates chapters on the Stones' history, based on extensive band interviews, some never bettered, with visceral episodes from the relentless chaos, excitement and abundant debauchery of the journey the Stones took on their way to its grim conclusion at Altamnont . . . ' (Uncut 2012-05-01)

Booth's strong, sound prose brings to life the out-of-control process through which an age intoxicated by its own passions found a hard-driving music to live hard by. In all the annals of the '60s, there is nothing on paper that so evokes those days and nights. (Salon)

Astonishing . . . part oral history and part midnight diary in a world where midnight goes on forever. (Los Angeles Reader)

One of the truly great rock books (Hot Press)

An epic, behind-the-scenes record of life with the greatest rock band in the world, capturing both the carnivalesque excess and the mundane grind of the rock tour (Observer)

The most brutally compelling book about rock'n'roll and its casualties ever written (Guardian)

A marvellous book, Booth is a fine writer, and has a strong style that perfectly complements his engaging subject. Canongate have also included an introduction from Greil Marcus, a fine writer in his own right, which just adds to the value of this fine book. Highly recommended to anyone who now only loves music, but an engaging story well told (Destructive Music)

Book Description

'The one authentic masterpiece of rock 'n' roll writing' Peter Guralnick

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Customer Reviews

4.0 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Jeremy Walton TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 26 Feb 2013
Format: Paperback
I'd read Stanley Booth's gripping first-person account of the infamous Altamont festival in The Faber Book of Pop, and remembered that it was an extract from this book when I came across it in HMV's sale. Altamont came just after the Stones' tour of the USA in November 1969, and Booth here tells the story of what it was like to be part of that extraordinary experience. The tour was the band's first visit to the US in three years, and was one of the first to target large-scale arenas. In addition, it marked the debut - leaving aside the band's Hyde Park concert a few months previously - of Mick Taylor, who'd been brought in as a replacement for Brian Jones, just prior to Jones's death two days before the Hyde Park gig. The shows in New York were released for posterity as 'Get Yer Ya-Ya's Out!' (thought by some to be the best live album ever), while the film Gimme Shelter documents part of the tour and Altamont itself. And, as if all that wasn't of enough significance, the Stones (along with Booth) also visited Muscle Shoals studios just after the tour had ended to record (what turned out to be) two of their greatest songs: "Brown Sugar" and "Wild Horses", which were eventually released in 1971 on Sticky Fingers.Read more ›
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By RK on 4 May 2012
Format: Paperback
Follows the Stones on the fated 1969 US tour that culminated in the infamous concert at Altamont. I knew I was in good hands as soon as I read the following early passage, describing the reporters at a pre-tour Stones press conference:

"They all appeared to be in their early twenties... dressed in the current style, achieved by spending large sums of money to look poor and bedraggled, like a new race of middle-class gypsies. They ate like gypsies, snatching up cakes and fruit and drinks."

Captures not only The Stones at the peak of their world dominance, but also the peak and decline of an era. Wonderful reading.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By KKN on 7 July 2012
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This is a fantastic book about the Stones in their heyday. The narrative flips between the early days of the band and the tour that culminated in the ill-fated Altamont show. The story is told by Stanley Booth, who at the time of the tour was a young writer on the road with the band. If you are a fan of the band - and particularly of their early seventies recordings (who isn't?) - then I thoroughly recommend this book to you.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Annie on 10 Jan 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Let us start by saying I was a very young child during the late 1960s and early 1970s, but like many people from my generation, was always enamoured by the sounds of the 1960s, particularly The Rolling Stones. I first read this in the 1980s and it was read, lent to friends and then re-read until it fell apart.

What I like? It feels like you are reading a letter from the frontier of youth culture during a particular heady time in the Twentieth Century. It has not been doctored to suit 21st Century sensibilities and all the stronger for it. For example, the reader gets to fully understand to what extent bands like The Rolling Stones were seen to be saviours and spokespeople for a new movement and a new way of life. Also, you will notice the idolisation of black artists / musicians, which at times, to a 21st Century reader, verges on stereotype.

It is beautifully written. You are THERE - no really! From the descriptions of living with the Stones (going out for dinner etc) to standing at the side of the stage watching them perform, to noticing someone at the airport - Stanley Booth captures it all.

I would recommend this to anyone who enjoys excellent, honest writing and has an interest in this period of history. If you are a Rolling Stones fan it is required reading, if you are not, you will still enjoy it.
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By Paul Cosgrove on 16 July 2014
Format: Paperback
I'm finding it extremely difficult to get through this book. To me it seems like Stanley Booth's autobiography with a few anecdotes about The Rolling Stones thrown in to spice it up a bit. As a Stones fan I want to read about what THEY get up to, not Stanley Booth. I don't really need to know which record company boss he has dinner with or about his relationship with his wife. I don't want to know about the difficulties he had getting the book written at all. I just want to read about the true adventures of The Rolling Stones which seem to be incidental in this account of a moment in the life of Stanley Booth.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Very slow read, mostly due to a lot of irrelevant content about the author's own life and not being related to the Stones at all most of the time. In fact, there's f*** all adventures except for the last 50 pages, in which he covers the Atlamont concert and Brian Jones' death in detail. He (Stanley Booth) seems like a bit of a bell-end as well, but ah, just my opinion. If you want some Rolling Stones stories, get Keith Richards' autobiography 'Life', now that's a read.
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