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Trouble In Paradise
 
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Trouble In Paradise

21 July 2014 | Format: MP3

£7.99 (VAT included if applicable)
Buy the CD album for £7.98 and get the MP3 version for FREE. Does not apply to gift orders.
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Song Title
Time
Popularity  
30
1
4:21
30
2
3:53
30
3
4:15
30
4
5:11
30
5
4:17
30
6
3:30
30
7
6:59
30
8
5:39
30
9
4:04

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Product details

  • Original Release Date: 21 July 2014
  • Release Date: 21 July 2014
  • Label: Polydor Ltd.
  • Copyright: (C) 2014 Polydor Ltd. (UK)
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 42:09
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B00KWUKCGU
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (50 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 341 in MP3 Albums (See Top 100 in MP3 Albums)

Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

13 of 13 people found the following review helpful By Top Pete on 28 July 2014
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
For any new artist trying to be successful in the ever more cut-throat music business, a 5 year gap between debut album and follow-up is unthinkable. World class acts which have been established for 20 or 30 years or more; yes. New acts in their early twenties; no. Definitely not.

However, La Roux's Elly Jackson is not cut from the same cloth as many of today's here-today-gone-tomorrow artists. The 5 years that have elapsed since La Roux's debut have been extremely eventful, and stressful, for Ms Jackson. She parted company with her collaborator on the debut album, Ben Langmaid, and is now effectively on her own.

La Roux's 2009 debut album was considered by most to be very strong, and was almost universally critically acclaimed. It had great songs, but a rather unfortunate tinny production, and Jackson's voice was, well, rather shrill and piercing at times. But it had a lot going for it and the potential was certainly there.

Forward 5 years to 2014 and finally, at long last, we have the follow up, Trouble In Paradise. It was well worth the wait. The songs are better, the production is better, and Jackson's voice has matured and she sounds great.

Jackson clearly wears her influences on her sleeve, and this album has a very 1980s feel to it, and in a really good way. You can hear elements of The Eurythmics, David Bowie, Madonna, Erasure (when they were good), Pet Shop Boys, Human League, and even Depeche Mode and Kraftwerk. She has thrown all these influences into the pot, written 9 absolutely cracking tunes, and has turned out what must be in the running for album of the year. Every one of the 9 songs is superb. There isn't a filler in sight.

If there's any justice this whole album should be the sound of Summer 2014.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By William Mason TOP 1000 REVIEWER on 1 Oct 2014
Format: Audio CD
This album has a distinctly 80's feel to it. Uptight Downtown has Spandau Ballet written all over it - if Tony Hadley sang it, you wouldn't doubt it was a Spandau track. Kiss and Not Tell is instantly catchy with a distinctive, chirpy, synth hook in the chorus (it's the strongest track on the album). Cruel Sexuality is very Eurythmics, it's very easy to imagine Annie Lennox singing this song.
Paradise Is You sounds like a Dave Stewart and Barbara Gaskin track. Sexotheque sounds like something The Specials or The Boomtown Rats might have done. Silent Partner sounds like a Soft Cell track. I love 80's synth-pop - Depeche Mode, Human League, Blancmange, Thomas Dolby - so I'm more than happy when a modern artist tries to recreate that sound.
However, this is definitely not a 4 star or 5 star album, to rate that highly it would need at least a couple of stand out tracks, and it doesn't. You won't find a Bedsitter here, or Don't You Want Me Baby, or Only You, or Vienna, there's nothing here close to that standard.
Furthermore, the lead vocalist is not a particularly strong one, she's no Annie Lennox or Alison Moyet. Don't get me wrong, I admire La Roux for being honest about their musical inspirations, and this is hardly a poor album. However, it really lacks a single killer track and that's a pity. After 5 years in the making, it's quite a disappointment and let down that this album doesn't have at least one exceptional track.
If you want a fabulous album by a modern artist, that harks back proudly to its 80's roots, try Happiness by Hurts, and Nonsense In The Dark by Filthy Dukes. If you love Depeche Mode, Yazoo, Human League and Heaven 17, I'd be stunned if you didn't like those two albums.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Scaroth, Last of the Jagaroth on 12 Aug 2014
Format: Audio CD
After the all conquering eponymous debut, La Roux’s core of vocalist and band ‘face’ Elly Jackson and producer Ben Langmaid waited five years to release this follow-up; Langmaid departing two years before the album arrived due to the usual ‘creative differences’. Described on its release as a ‘New Wave’ style record, Trouble in Paradise wears its early-mid 80s influences proudly on its sleeve – as did its predecessor La Roux, however Jackson has been cited as describing the second album as much warmer than the first – this is borne out by the lush dub beats of Tropical Chancer, and the wry if corny Sexotheque, both tracks featuring stronger production values and benefitting from Jackson’s more mature and less spiky vocals compared to album one. Sadly, these two songs are far and away the best that the record has to offer – opening track Uptight Downtown has a promising early Bananarama vibe, but Kiss and not Tell seems to be channeling the kind of mid to late 1980s frothy pop perpetrated by the likes of Stock, Aitken, and Waterman, while the remainder of the album contains little that is either ambitious or memorable.
Despite the negatives however, this a solid if predictable second album that will hopefully pave the way for La Roux to develop over future records – despite the loss of her other half.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Jonnie Romney on 24 July 2014
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
This album, after a long wait, lives up to all my hopes for it. The lightweight eighties style music sounds great to someone who was in their twenties in 1983 - from the point of view of its uplifting qualities - simple on the suface but quite clever and complex if you listen more carefully - but definitely nostalgic for eighties people. But what really makes the album, is the contrast between this music and the lyrics / subjectmatter - poignant and deeply felt, very moving. A great second album.
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