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3.3 out of 5 stars
Triple Ignition (The Western Awakening Trilogy, Book 1)
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
on 22 May 2014
As a trilogy this is a well researched and written tale. However overall I can not give it 5 stars as it has been trapped into a trilogy in which more skillful editing would have produced a better literary narrative with less padding of the various plot-lines. The various plots are topical. I am not technically knowledgeable to comment on the defence aspects but the UK political situation is so real it could make some readers very nervous. For example dissatisfaction with the present government system, the control from Brussels the EU legislature, the secrecy of family courts and lack of faith in the UK police.
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9 of 11 people found the following review helpful
on 8 February 2012
I whacked this onto my kindle after being alerted by a friend `in the business' that the author had worked for many years in the high end of the defence industry, and that some of the technology obliquely referred to is very much on-going and highly classified.
It didn't disappoint as a fast, techno rich, paranoid thriller only requiring the suspension of dis-belief by casting the EU (yes European union) as capable of achieving anything, let alone co-ordinated malevolent intent. In the same way the somewhat heroic stance of the State of Israel might well grate with many, but this only demonstrates that the book draws you in and makes you start thinking. The laws of physics are also meddled with but in a way that makes you wonder, rather than laugh, because you would really need to know your stuff to start challenging some of the assumptions. All in all the political strategy and the techno /military tactical side of the plot were well thought through and engaging, I inhaled it in a couple of sessions.
The human side of the story is a bit less successful in that the heroes are all too heroic and could do with a bit more human frailty, but it doesn't spoil the read and is possibly an over-reaction to the current obsession with damaged and frail individuals as heroes.
That the author has `walked the walk" in the techno field comes through often, much like the best of Andy McNab in his field, so I'm waiting for the next one of what is flagged as a trilogy.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
on 5 November 2013
Ayn Rand's 1957 book argues that human advancement is driven by `rationally self-interested' individuals - she has industrialists, scientists, and artists battling government repression.
Triple Ignition takes a similar tack, telling the story of a private company that harnesses thermonuclear fusion. Whereas Rand's technologies are metallurgy, aircraft, and rail networks, this book's are quantum physics, nanotechnology, and collaborative networking. Nevertheless, its scientists, engineers, and businessmen are all Rand-style objectivist heroes.
The story line will be familiar to startup veterans. First, the founding team comes together by chance. Events then trigger them to walk away from safe salaried jobs and commit to realizing their dreams. Then comes the long slog of building a team of the brightest and best, structuring it to use every talent to the max, and battling through scientific and technological roadblocks. Along the way our heroes learn, Rand-style, a lot about how to better organize a modern society. Finally, as they take their fusion products to market, governments pounce.
Atlas Shrugged is (in)famous for the thirty page speech in which its hero, John Galt, sets out his values and goals. Readers of this book face three such speeches, but they're very much shorter.
So a great book for libertarians but not for liberals.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 1 November 2014
Great read; techno stuff seems well researched (and presumably understood by the author). Sometimes the behaviour and dialogue of the characters stretched my credulity a bit, but what the heck. Need more! Got to download the next part ASAP! Thank you Thomas Gibbon. I enjoyed your work and will look for more.
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on 7 June 2014
Looked promising but I found it a little disappointing.

The technical stuff is interesting and is the real strength of the book, well the only one really.

I wasn't expecting great literature and I didn't get it. I'm not sure what the author intended to convey with this work. Perhaps a vehicle for the extreme views espoused via the book's main characters? As these -and the plot - tend to the ridiculous, perhaps some satire is intended?

Naturally, the main characters are all handsome/beautiful/genius/talented etc etc. All have the substance of wet cardboard.

Having started book 2 of this trilogy, I can say that things don't get better. I am compelled to finish reading even rubbish to the bitter end. If you're not, don't bother with this.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 15 February 2014
Excellent read. Interesting characters and all round good fun. Being a euro-sceptic myself, it is nice to read something that it is a bit anti, but also pro a proper democracy
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on 30 May 2014
This is the first of a triology, good plot all the way throughthe series, enjoyed it but I had to check a number of times if it was written by a female writer, there are a number of chapters dedicated to feminist attitudes and thinking, which fine in its own context but detracts from the story, this same line was carried through in the second book but in the final book the action is fast and furious and there just isn't enough time for the mumble jumbel. Please Thomas keep to the main thrust of your stories which are brilliant and in future don't be distracted.
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on 17 March 2014
I felt a little cheated on reading this book. The plot is excellent, and some of the character development is really well done. There is however a serious need for proof reading the script. The political agenda (all politician's are useless and feathering their own nest - let's build our own revolution) is too one-sided,and leaves you feeling that this is more of a manifesto than a novel. Shame - This book had a real head start with such a good plot, but i will not be continuing with the series.
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6 of 8 people found the following review helpful
on 24 February 2012
This is not my usual sort of book, but I was assured it `isn't a formula thriller, and you'll like it' so I gave it a try. And was enthralled. There are lots of interesting and believable characters, sharply distinctive, behaving realistically. And unlike most books of this type the women are also real. A previous reviewer says they are all portrayed as geniuses, but they are just scientists - above average intelligence obviously, but hardly geniuses - especially emotionally.
I found the technical side of the book plausible, though I don't know enough about the science and the weaponry to know if it is possible. The political plotline is horribly plausible - I find myself viewing the headlines in the newspapers with new eyes. It's especially worrying when you find yourself rethinking all the actions successive governments have taken in previous years which you thought were just incompetence but now you wonder...
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12 of 16 people found the following review helpful
on 13 October 2013
A bizarre book.
As always, I start with an open mind, and merely ask the author to entertain me, but I have to admit that I considered dumping this item about fifty times before I actually did.
This is written by an author whose sympathies lie somewhere to the far right in US politics, where goddam Democrats are pinkos and bleeding hearts, where the Brits are idiots, and Europeans are shifty foreigners who really need nuked to teach them a lesson, and the only people capable of saving the world in his ludicrous scenario are a tiny number of nice geniuses with millions of dollars to play around with, all looking back with misty eyes at the Reagan years whilst making epoch changing technological breakthroughs on a daily basis.
I was bored and offended in equal measure by the sheer idiocy, and I'd had enough halfway through and removed it from my Kindle, whilst trying to resist sterilising it with alcohol afterwards.
If you enjoy offensive thoughtless nonsense, you'll lap this one right up.
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